BRRABill's Field Report With Linux



  • Branching off from the ever popular "Field Report With Xenserver" thread, I figured I would start this one, as I always seem to run into a little snag here or there with my Linux systems.

    Today's question:
    I am running my XO install on Ubuntu 16.04.1.

    I went to update it today, and am coming across the following error. What does this mean, exactly?

    sudo apt-get upgrade
    Reading package lists... Done
    Building dependency tree
    Reading state information... Done
    You might want to run 'apt-get -f install' to correct these.
    The following packages have unmet dependencies:
     linux-image-extra-4.4.0-34-generic : Depends: linux-image-4.4.0-34-generic but it is not installed
     linux-image-generic : Depends: linux-image-4.4.0-34-generic but it is not installed
                           Recommends: thermald but it is not installed
    E: Unmet dependencies. Try using -f.
    

    Note 'sudo apt-get -f install' returns this:

    (Reading database ... 203315 files and directories currently installed.)
    Preparing to unpack .../linux-image-4.4.0-34-generic_4.4.0-34.53_amd64.deb ...
    Done.
    Unpacking linux-image-4.4.0-34-generic (4.4.0-34.53) ...
    dpkg: error processing archive /var/cache/apt/archives/linux-image-4.4.0-34-generic_4.4.0-34.53_amd64.deb (--unpack):
     cannot copy extracted data for './boot/abi-4.4.0-34-generic' to '/boot/abi-4.4.0-34-generic.dpkg-new': failed to write (No space left on device)
    No apport report written because the error message indicates a disk full error
                                                                                  dpkg-deb: error: subprocess paste was killed by signal (Broken pipe)
    Examining /etc/kernel/postrm.d .
    run-parts: executing /etc/kernel/postrm.d/initramfs-tools 4.4.0-34-generic /boot/vmlinuz-4.4.0-34-generic
    run-parts: executing /etc/kernel/postrm.d/zz-update-grub 4.4.0-34-generic /boot/vmlinuz-4.4.0-34-generic
    Errors were encountered while processing:
     /var/cache/apt/archives/linux-image-4.4.0-34-generic_4.4.0-34.53_amd64.deb
    E: Sub-process /usr/bin/dpkg returned an error code (1)
    


  • Oh, I think I figured out my issue!

    Duh.



  • failed to write (No space left on device)
    No apport report written because the error message indicates a disk full error
    

    ;)



  • Off to Google for article on how to clean up the boot partition.

    Why does Linux seem to always make the boot partition so small? On multiple systems it always seems to fill up quickly.



  • @tiagom said in BRRABill's Field Report With Linux:

    failed to write (No space left on device)
    No apport report written because the error message indicates a disk full error
    

    ;)

    Yeah, you know I missed that until I posted it here and it got colored syntax.


  • Service Provider

    @BRRABill said in BRRABill's Field Report With Linux:

    Off to Google for article on how to clean up the boot partition.

    Why does Linux seem to always make the boot partition so small? On multiple systems it always seems to fill up quickly.

    That's weird, I've not see that happen in decades. How big is your boot partition?

    df -h /boot
    

    What were your install parameters?



  • @scottalanmiller said in BRRABill's Field Report With Linux:

    @BRRABill said in BRRABill's Field Report With Linux:

    Off to Google for article on how to clean up the boot partition.

    Why does Linux seem to always make the boot partition so small? On multiple systems it always seems to fill up quickly.

    That's weird, I've not see that happen in decades. How big is your boot partition?

    df -h /boot
    

    What were your install parameters?

    I just nexted through the install. I didn't change any options.


  • Service Provider

    What size did it give you?



  • @scottalanmiller

    df -h /boot
    Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    /dev/xvda1      236M  225M     0 100% /boot
    
    

  • Service Provider

    This is what my Ubuntu 16.04.1 install gave me..

    [email protected]:~$ df -h /boot
    Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    /dev/sdb2       120G   20G  101G  16% /
    


  • @scottalanmiller said in BRRABill's Field Report With Linux:

    This is what my Ubuntu 16.04.1 install gave me..

    [email protected]:~$ df -h /boot
    Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    /dev/sdb2       120G   20G  101G  16% /
    

    WTH.

    Let me run through a fresh install again and see what it does...


  • Service Provider

    Here is a fresh Mint 18 install on the Scale and what it chose to do. It's Ubuntu 16.04 under the hood.

    0_1471269891214_Screenshot from 2016-08-15 10-04-23.png



  • 0_1471269922836_Capture.PNG
    I was curious about my CentOS VM running production owncloud.



  • CentOS 7 here

    [[email protected] ~]# df -h /boot
    Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    /dev/md126      488M  133M  321M  30% /boot
    [[email protected] ~]#


  • @tiagom how do you get the pretty colors? :-)


  • Service Provider

    @alex.olynyk said in BRRABill's Field Report With Linux:

    @tiagom how do you get the pretty colors? :-)

    He posted text, not a screen shot. MangoLassi added the colours.



  • This post is deleted!


  • Yup, you add 4 spaces in front of what whatever you want.

    like so


  • So it seems like it likes to undercut the boot partition?

    @scottalanmiller did you manually set yours?


  • Service Provider

    @BRRABill said in BRRABill's Field Report With Linux:

    So it seems like it likes to undercut the boot partition?

    @scottalanmiller did you manually set yours?

    Yes, but not like it is now, so it didn't accept my manual changed and modified itself to that.


  • Service Provider

    @BRRABill said in BRRABill's Field Report With Linux:

    So it seems like it likes to undercut the boot partition?

    Just on yours, we are all seeing larger sizes of around 500MB.



  • @scottalanmiller said in BRRABill's Field Report With Linux:

    @BRRABill said in BRRABill's Field Report With Linux:

    So it seems like it likes to undercut the boot partition?

    @scottalanmiller did you manually set yours?

    Yes, but not like it is now, so it didn't accept my manual changed and modified itself to that.

    Seems like (from the Google) I can delete old packages and whatnot.



  • Yours is about 50% smaller then the others posted.

    Maybe consider extending it?



  • I've run into this on two of the last 3 systems I've tried to upgrade... I just remove all but the most recent kernel files, and then run the upgrade again.

    Ubuntu 15.10 at initial Install

    Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    /dev/vda1       236M  111M  113M  50% /boot
    

    Ubuntu 14.04 at initial install

    Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    /dev/sda1       134M   72M   53M  58% /boot
    

    KVM Server on Ubuntu 15.10: No separate /boot partition (root FS is ext4)

    OpenSuSE Tumbleweed: No separate /boot partition (root FS is btrfs)



  • @dafyre said in BRRABill's Field Report With Linux:

    I've run into this on two of the last 3 systems I've tried to upgrade... I just remove all but the most recent kernel files, and then run the upgrade again.

    That's what I am doing, though only the absolute oldest, as the Google said not remove too many recent ones in case anything depends on them.

    But, you are saying it's safe to delete everything except the one running? (Obviously.)



  • I've run into this multiple times in the past with Ubuntu. For some reason old kernel images aren't removed when space is running low. To check your current image use uname -r. Then you can uninstall the older images.



  • @stacksofplates said in BRRABill's Field Report With Linux:

    I've run into this multiple times in the past with Ubuntu. For some reason old kernel images aren't removed when space is running low. To check your current image use uname -r. Then you can uninstall the older images.

    And I can delete every kernel image I am not using?



  • @BRRABill said in BRRABill's Field Report With Linux:

    @stacksofplates said in BRRABill's Field Report With Linux:

    I've run into this multiple times in the past with Ubuntu. For some reason old kernel images aren't removed when space is running low. To check your current image use uname -r. Then you can uninstall the older images.

    And I can delete every kernel image I am not using?

    I ask because I did an "autopurge" and it left two of them.



  • You can but I'd keep one or two extra to fall back on.



  • @BRRABill said in BRRABill's Field Report With Linux:

    @dafyre said in BRRABill's Field Report With Linux:

    I've run into this on two of the last 3 systems I've tried to upgrade... I just remove all but the most recent kernel files, and then run the upgrade again.

    That's what I am doing, though only the absolute oldest, as the Google said not remove too many recent ones in case anything depends on them.

    But, you are saying it's safe to delete everything except the one running? (Obviously.)

    Essentially,. that's what I do... But I copy the /boot directory somewhere else on my main partition just in case I need to put it back, lol.


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