Teens Look at Original N64 Super Smash Bros!




  • Service Provider

    Given that these kids' jobs is to look at old stuff that most kids don't see.... how are they still shocked by stuff from their childhood? It's always the same kids, it's like they never learn from week after week of "wow, that's old." I think they are either a bit slow or just acting at this point.


  • Service Provider

    This one is really just kids playing a video game. They aren't really reacting to anything.


  • Service Provider

    What kind of name is Ness? They suck. They didn't figure out that he is named after the NES nor do they know Earthbound 😞 Fail.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    What kind of name is Ness? They suck. They didn't figure out that he is named after the NES nor do they know Earthbound 😞 Fail.

    I haven't watched the video yet. I will ASAP.


  • Service Provider

    The biggest thing is..... how do they remain so clueless?



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    The biggest thing is..... how do they remain so clueless?

    I am seriously surprised by how many kids just don't know basic devices of the 90s. Even though they've been replaced for over a decade, have they never watched a 90s TV show?


  • Service Provider

    @thanksaj said:

    I haven't watched the video yet. I will ASAP.

    It's pretty boring. The most boring of theirs that I have seen yet. It's a new thing that they are doing where they just play a video game against each other and record it. That's all. Just random people who are surprised by everyday technology and don't remember their own childhoods playing barely old video games poorly.


  • Service Provider

    @thanksaj said:

    I am seriously surprised by how many kids just don't know basic devices of the 90s. Even though they've been replaced for over a decade, have they never watched a 90s TV show?

    More shocking is that they existed in their own childhoods. Kids more in 1996, for example, would have been alive for the height of the laserdisc era, the fall of VHS, the first DVDs to come out, the Nintendo 64, etc. Yes, they would have been young, but I know every toy, every computer, every media option, every household device that existed not just when I was three but for a decade or more before I was born.

    I've never met a person born before 1980 that didn't know what an eight track or an LP was even though those were pretty rare (eight tracks especially) by that time. We all knew what the music of the 1960s was like and we knew all of the technology that we had replaced. Things that were gone decades before our time, we were familiar with. These kids must be shocked just walking around their own house. Things that they grew up with seem foreign to them. We aren't even talking about things that came before their time.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    @thanksaj said:

    I am seriously surprised by how many kids just don't know basic devices of the 90s. Even though they've been replaced for over a decade, have they never watched a 90s TV show?

    More shocking is that they existed in their own childhoods. Kids more in 1996, for example, would have been alive for the height of the laserdisc era, the fall of VHS, the first DVDs to come out, the Nintendo 64, etc. Yes, they would have been young, but I know every toy, every computer, every media option, every household device that existed not just when I was three but for a decade or more before I was born.

    I've never met a person born before 1980 that didn't know what an eight track or an LP was even though those were pretty rare (eight tracks especially) by that time. We all knew what the music of the 1960s was like and we knew all of the technology that we had replaced. Things that were gone decades before our time, we were familiar with. These kids must be shocked just walking around their own house. Things that they grew up with seem foreign to them. We aren't even talking about things that came before their time.

    Maybe it's just because technology changes faster now. I was born in 1992 and still have never seen a laser disc. I went from VHS to DVD. Honestly, from what I've seen, the further south in the USA you go, the more likely you are to find legacy equipment at any given point. States like California and NY were more likely to have families with the newer technology closer to its original release. Florida was an exception to that, but that's just what I've seen.



  • @thanksaj said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @thanksaj said:

    I am seriously surprised by how many kids just don't know basic devices of the 90s. Even though they've been replaced for over a decade, have they never watched a 90s TV show?

    More shocking is that they existed in their own childhoods. Kids more in 1996, for example, would have been alive for the height of the laserdisc era, the fall of VHS, the first DVDs to come out, the Nintendo 64, etc. Yes, they would have been young, but I know every toy, every computer, every media option, every household device that existed not just when I was three but for a decade or more before I was born.

    I've never met a person born before 1980 that didn't know what an eight track or an LP was even though those were pretty rare (eight tracks especially) by that time. We all knew what the music of the 1960s was like and we knew all of the technology that we had replaced. Things that were gone decades before our time, we were familiar with. These kids must be shocked just walking around their own house. Things that they grew up with seem foreign to them. We aren't even talking about things that came before their time.

    Maybe it's just because technology changes faster now. I was born in 1992 and still have never seen a laser disc. I went from VHS to DVD. Honestly, from what I've seen, the further south in the USA you go, the more likely you are to find legacy equipment at any given point. States like California and NY were more likely to have families with the newer technology closer to its original release. Florida was an exception to that, but that's just what I've seen.

    Still, I used to use a record player at one babysitter's house. I listened to the Bee Gees. These kids should have at least seen these before. Hell, the Project64 emulator has made all the classic N64 games available on PC and runs on almost any hardware. It ran extremely smooth on the Thinkpad laptops running XP Pro I had in high school.


  • Service Provider

    @thanksaj said:

    Maybe it's just because technology changes faster now.

    Faster? It would be slower. Much slower. The 70s and 80s were the tech boom years. That's when everything changed. Constantly changed. Going from LD to DVD for movies was pretty minor. Going from nothing to LD was pretty staggering. Going from a Windows XP machine to a Windows 8.1 machine is barely noticeable. Going from no home computers to CLI only to GUIs was staggering.

    Change has slowed back to normal levels after a few decades of crazy innovation. Similar things happened with the combustion engine, flight, electricity, telephones, etc. But now, all we are doing is polishing that stuff. The last major change was the advent of home integration to the Internet. That was the giant leap in ~1994 and since then, nothing much has changed.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    @thanksaj said:

    Maybe it's just because technology changes faster now.

    Faster? It would be slower. Much slower. The 70s and 80s were the tech boom years. That's when everything changed. Constantly changed. Going from LD to DVD for movies was pretty minor. Going from nothing to LD was pretty staggering. Going from a Windows XP machine to a Windows 8.1 machine is barely noticeable. Going from no home computers to CLI only to GUIs was staggering.

    Change has slowed back to normal levels after a few decades of crazy innovation. Similar things happened with the combustion engine, flight, electricity, telephones, etc. But now, all we are doing is polishing that stuff. The last major change was the advent of home integration to the Internet. That was the giant leap in ~1994 and since then, nothing much has changed.

    How you perceive change and how the average person perceives change though, is two totally different things.


  • Service Provider

    @thanksaj said:

    I went from VHS to DVD.

    VHS was the fourth major format. LD was the original. But LD didn't peak until people could regularly afford good home theatres in the 1990s. VHS was not a theatre format, it was a "cheap way to record television" format. It had a different purpose. LD was the original format for home theatre and was the main one well into the DVD era. DVD didn't unseat LD until progressive scan came along. LD held the dominant home theatre format position for almost exactly twenty years.


  • Service Provider

    @thanksaj said:

    . Honestly, from what I've seen, the further south in the USA you go, the more likely you are to find legacy equipment at any given point.

    Depends on the technology. Way more old computers in the north and laserdiscs, for example, because they were for the more affluent customer back then. Everyone has computers now, but it used to be that only more forward thinking people had them and they were very expensive. So they were purchased in much larger quantities in the north and in California.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    @thanksaj said:

    . Honestly, from what I've seen, the further south in the USA you go, the more likely you are to find legacy equipment at any given point.

    Depends on the technology. Way more old computers in the north and laserdiscs, for example, because they were for the more affluent customer back then. Everyone has computers now, but it used to be that only more forward thinking people had them and they were very expensive. So they were purchased in much larger quantities in the north and in California.

    It's no secret the south has a lot less money than the north. That's been true for hundreds of years.


  • Service Provider

    @thanksaj said:

    How you perceive change and how the average person perceives change though, is two totally different things.

    Yes, most people see their own time span as changing faster than other time spans. Everyone young thinks that they live in a world of change and that previous times did not. I see it from an older perspective. Change has slower, dramatically. The household of today is essentially identical to the household of 2001 (when broadband, always on connections and Windows XP were available.) In fact, many people today still use computers, operating systems and Internet connections from 2001. Household technology has effectively frozen thirteen years ago.

    There was no time in the preceding seventy years when I would wager such stagnation could be said to have happened. We are actually, historically speaking, in the trough period of innovation. Every decade before now has had huge change associated with it. Going back to the late 1800s at least. We might easily be in the most stagnant period in over a century.


  • Service Provider

    @thanksaj said:

    It's no secret the south has a lot less money than the north. That's been true for hundreds of years.

    Many hundreds, at least back to the 1500s.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    @thanksaj said:

    It's no secret the south has a lot less money than the north. That's been true for hundreds of years.

    Many hundreds, at least back to the 1500s.

    Why did the South lose the Civil War? Because, North had the production, population, and money. The South had most of the skilled fighters, and the best generals. But they didn't have the money.


  • Service Provider

    @thanksaj said:

    Why did the South lose the Civil War? Because, North had the production, population, and money. The South had most of the skilled fighters, and the best generals. But they didn't have the money.

    The south also had to deal with a fifth column and a huge percentage of the population that didn't support the war. They were fighting for money and power, the north was fighting for human rights. In the south people struggled with their consciouses to support the war, in the north people struggled not to support it. It's hard to not consider the massive different there was in the ethics of both sides. The north had a lot more reason to win the war.


  • Service Provider

    @thanksaj said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    What kind of name is Ness? They suck. They didn't figure out that he is named after the NES nor do they know Earthbound 😞 Fail.

    I haven't watched the video yet. I will ASAP.

    Then why did you post it, if you hadn't even watched it?



  • @art_of_shred said:

    @thanksaj said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    What kind of name is Ness? They suck. They didn't figure out that he is named after the NES nor do they know Earthbound 😞 Fail.

    I haven't watched the video yet. I will ASAP.

    Then why did you post it, if you hadn't even watched it?

    Because usually their videos are good, and I didn't want to lose the video.



  • @scottalanmiller , you were right. That was a really pathetic video.


  • Service Provider

    @thanksaj said:

    Because usually their videos are good, and I didn't want to lose the video.

    I've seen one or two that were good, most are pretty bad. Because it's the same kids over and over being surprised by things that shouldn't surprise them it loses a lot of luster. If they did new kids every time and if it wasn't all canned it might be more entertaining. At some point these kids being really uneducated about the world around them loses its entertainment value.



  • OMG, I feel old now 😞


  • Service Provider

    Seriously, the N64 was not that long ago. I mean it's old, I understand. But it was 1996 - 2003. It first released 18 years ago. That's old. But it was still on the market two years into the Windows XP era. Only eleven years ago you could still buy them new and games were still coming out. For a system that young, any kind who is sixteen should know it as a major game console from when they were young. And it would have lingered on in homes for many more years.

    I remember game systems that were out when I was five. It's crazy to think that a major video game platform from when I was five would be unknown to me. I can't imagine how that could happen.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    Seriously, the N64 was not that long ago. I mean it's old, I understand. But it was 1996 - 2003. It first released 18 years ago. That's old. But it was still on the market two years into the Windows XP era. Only eleven years ago you could still buy them new and games were still coming out. For a system that young, any kind who is sixteen should know it as a major game console from when they were young. And it would have lingered on in homes for many more years.

    I remember game systems that were out when I was five. It's crazy to think that a major video game platform from when I was five would be unknown to me. I can't imagine how that could happen.

    Especially one of the caliber of the N64.



  • In my hey day with that game, I would have nailed them all 😃

    My favourites were Yoshi, Pikachu and Ness
    My favourite punching bag was Jigglypuff

    I must have clocked a few hundred hours on that game.



  • The most disappointing thing about that video was the lack of special moves. Still good though.

    Instant rivalry, just add Super Smash Bros.



  • @nadnerB said:

    In my hey day with that game, I would have nailed them all 😃

    My favourites were Yoshi, Pikachu and Ness
    My favourite punching bag was Jigglypuff

    I must have clocked a few hundred hours on that game.

    I'm Link, sometimes Samus, and Captain Falcon is okay, but I preferred Ganadorf on Melee. He wasn't quite as fast, which made him easier to control. Same moves, but stronger. On Melee, I OWNED with Roy, although I could use Marth pretty well too.