Windows 10 Build 14342



  • The latest Windows 10 preview has been released by Microsoft, with changes making it more Linux and web-friendly.

    Gone, however, is automatic Wi-Fi sharing with contacts, with Microsoft citing low uptake over cost of development.

    Extensions to Edge, Microsoft’s browser alternative to Internet Explorer, in Windows 10 build 14342 can now be downloaded from the Windows Store.

    Mustard sauce: http://www.channelregister.co.uk/2016/05/11/windows_10_build_14342_features/

    More sauce: https://blogs.windows.com/windowsexperience/2016/05/10/announcing-windows-10-insider-preview-build-14342/



  • @nadnerB said in Windows 10 Build 14342:

    Gone, however, is automatic Wi-Fi sharing with contacts, with Microsoft citing low uptake over cost of development.

    Everyone f[moderated]ing dance the happy dance.



  • Sadly it wasn't because "it was the right thing to do" but only because it cost too much to make a feature everyone was ignoring.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Windows 10 Build 14342:

    Sadly it wasn't because "it was the right thing to do" but only because it cost too much to make a feature everyone was ignoring.

    Or was using and didn't know it.



  • @dafyre said in Windows 10 Build 14342:

    @scottalanmiller said in Windows 10 Build 14342:

    Sadly it wasn't because "it was the right thing to do" but only because it cost too much to make a feature everyone was ignoring.

    Or was using and didn't know it.

    That probably covered all of the remaining people.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Windows 10 Build 14342:

    Sadly it wasn't because "it was the right thing to do" but only because it cost too much to make a feature everyone was ignoring.

    It was a feature to share your WiFi information with other Windows PCs to prevent people from having to try and remember a password.

    It's a completely worthless effort. I'm glad it's gone.



  • How could that even have been a considered idea at this point in time?



  • This was actually a good feature. It required you to check a box, and then uncheck it later, but the security implications were low, and the ease of use was high. I've had the feature on WP for years, and used it successfully. It is disappointing that Microsoft bowed to an uneducated outcry. Of all the concerns with Windows 10 and privacy this was not even on the radar.



  • @Kelly said in Windows 10 Build 14342:

    This was actually a good feature. It required you to check a box, and then uncheck it later, but the security implications were low, and the ease of use was high. I've had the feature on WP for years, and used it successfully. It is disappointing that Microsoft bowed to an uneducated outcry. Of all the concerns with Windows 10 and privacy this was not even on the radar.

    I agree the outcry of privacy concerns was way over blow - Yeah I'm looking at you Steve Gibson of GRC.com.

    That said, Sharing passwords for WiFi networks with friends - uh yeah no.. I have a public WiFi network at home I want you on, not my private one. More and more home routers these days have this as a default, so the idea of just passing my private WiFi info to my friends is pointless since I don't use the public WiFi in my house, I use the private side.

    instead I would like to see MS come up with a way to display/print a QR Code of the WiFi password and all MS products with a camera could read those codes and accept the password instead of having to type them in.



  • @Dashrender said in Windows 10 Build 14342:

    @Kelly said in Windows 10 Build 14342:

    This was actually a good feature. It required you to check a box, and then uncheck it later, but the security implications were low, and the ease of use was high. I've had the feature on WP for years, and used it successfully. It is disappointing that Microsoft bowed to an uneducated outcry. Of all the concerns with Windows 10 and privacy this was not even on the radar.

    I agree the outcry of privacy concerns was way over blow - Yeah I'm looking at you Steve Gibson of GRC.com.

    That said, Sharing passwords for WiFi networks with friends - uh yeah no.. I have a public WiFi network at home I want you on, not my private one. More and more home routers these days have this as a default, so the idea of just passing my private WiFi info to my friends is pointless since I don't use the public WiFi in my house, I use the private side.

    instead I would like to see MS come up with a way to display/print a QR Code of the WiFi password and all MS products with a camera could read those codes and accept the password instead of having to type them in.

    It is a checkbox that is unchecked by default. To share your public wifi with your friends, you just join that SSID at some point, check the box, and voila, it works. Well, not any more.



  • @Kelly said in Windows 10 Build 14342:

    @Dashrender said in Windows 10 Build 14342:

    @Kelly said in Windows 10 Build 14342:

    This was actually a good feature. It required you to check a box, and then uncheck it later, but the security implications were low, and the ease of use was high. I've had the feature on WP for years, and used it successfully. It is disappointing that Microsoft bowed to an uneducated outcry. Of all the concerns with Windows 10 and privacy this was not even on the radar.

    I agree the outcry of privacy concerns was way over blow - Yeah I'm looking at you Steve Gibson of GRC.com.

    That said, Sharing passwords for WiFi networks with friends - uh yeah no.. I have a public WiFi network at home I want you on, not my private one. More and more home routers these days have this as a default, so the idea of just passing my private WiFi info to my friends is pointless since I don't use the public WiFi in my house, I use the private side.

    instead I would like to see MS come up with a way to display/print a QR Code of the WiFi password and all MS products with a camera could read those codes and accept the password instead of having to type them in.

    It is a checkbox that is unchecked by default. To share your public wifi with your friends, you just join that SSID at some point, check the box, and voila, it works. Well, not any more.

    It wasn't just your public that would be shared, I don't recall seeing any way to limit which WiFi networks you had joined to be shared. So even if I do join my public wifi, assuming I joined my private one, the friends would get both.

    I recall that there was a checkbox and it was disabled by default.



  • @Dashrender said in Windows 10 Build 14342:

    @Kelly said in Windows 10 Build 14342:

    @Dashrender said in Windows 10 Build 14342:

    @Kelly said in Windows 10 Build 14342:

    This was actually a good feature. It required you to check a box, and then uncheck it later, but the security implications were low, and the ease of use was high. I've had the feature on WP for years, and used it successfully. It is disappointing that Microsoft bowed to an uneducated outcry. Of all the concerns with Windows 10 and privacy this was not even on the radar.

    I agree the outcry of privacy concerns was way over blow - Yeah I'm looking at you Steve Gibson of GRC.com.

    That said, Sharing passwords for WiFi networks with friends - uh yeah no.. I have a public WiFi network at home I want you on, not my private one. More and more home routers these days have this as a default, so the idea of just passing my private WiFi info to my friends is pointless since I don't use the public WiFi in my house, I use the private side.

    instead I would like to see MS come up with a way to display/print a QR Code of the WiFi password and all MS products with a camera could read those codes and accept the password instead of having to type them in.

    It is a checkbox that is unchecked by default. To share your public wifi with your friends, you just join that SSID at some point, check the box, and voila, it works. Well, not any more.

    It wasn't just your public that would be shared, I don't recall seeing any way to limit which WiFi networks you had joined to be shared. So even if I do join my public wifi, assuming I joined my private one, the friends would get both.

    I recall that there was a checkbox and it was disabled by default.

    There were two parts to it. You had to enable WiFi Sense overall, and then it was a checkbox on a per SSID basis IIRC. I'm on a domain joined install of Win10, so I can't confirm my recollection.



  • @Kelly said in Windows 10 Build 14342:

    @Dashrender said in Windows 10 Build 14342:

    @Kelly said in Windows 10 Build 14342:

    @Dashrender said in Windows 10 Build 14342:

    @Kelly said in Windows 10 Build 14342:

    This was actually a good feature. It required you to check a box, and then uncheck it later, but the security implications were low, and the ease of use was high. I've had the feature on WP for years, and used it successfully. It is disappointing that Microsoft bowed to an uneducated outcry. Of all the concerns with Windows 10 and privacy this was not even on the radar.

    I agree the outcry of privacy concerns was way over blow - Yeah I'm looking at you Steve Gibson of GRC.com.

    That said, Sharing passwords for WiFi networks with friends - uh yeah no.. I have a public WiFi network at home I want you on, not my private one. More and more home routers these days have this as a default, so the idea of just passing my private WiFi info to my friends is pointless since I don't use the public WiFi in my house, I use the private side.

    instead I would like to see MS come up with a way to display/print a QR Code of the WiFi password and all MS products with a camera could read those codes and accept the password instead of having to type them in.

    It is a checkbox that is unchecked by default. To share your public wifi with your friends, you just join that SSID at some point, check the box, and voila, it works. Well, not any more.

    It wasn't just your public that would be shared, I don't recall seeing any way to limit which WiFi networks you had joined to be shared. So even if I do join my public wifi, assuming I joined my private one, the friends would get both.

    I recall that there was a checkbox and it was disabled by default.

    There were two parts to it. You had to enable WiFi Sense overall, and then it was a checkbox on a per SSID basis IIRC. I'm on a domain joined install of Win10, so I can't confirm my recollection.

    I recall that you could pick and choose things like facebook friends or twitter friends, but not pick which SSIDs... my personal, non domain joined device is at home.



  • One of the things brought up on theregister.co.uk was the fact that they just removed a service you paid for, without warning. Gave me a moment's pause that's for sure.

    http://forums.theregister.co.uk/forum/1/2016/05/11/windows_10_build_14342_features/



  • @MattSpeller said in Windows 10 Build 14342:

    One of the things brought up on theregister.co.uk was the fact that they just removed a service you paid for, without warning. Gave me a moment's pause that's for sure.

    http://forums.theregister.co.uk/forum/1/2016/05/11/windows_10_build_14342_features/

    A service we paid for? Are you kidding me? other than someone who bought a new PC, who do you know who's paid for Windows 10? I don't know anyone.

    Sounds like someone who's just dreaming up more drama!



  • @Dashrender Try and look past the fact that you don't like the service/feature



  • @MattSpeller said in Windows 10 Build 14342:

    @Dashrender Try and look past the fact that you don't like the service/feature

    MS removes things from time to time.. they are no where near as bad as Google - Google kills things all the time.



  • Waiting for open source banter in 5...4...3......



  • @Dashrender said

    A service we paid for? Are you kidding me?

    Where's my ability to remove the store from Windows 10 pro via GPO?
    Where is X
    Where is Y
    Where is Z

    That's the problem.

    @Dashrender said

    MS removes things from time to time.. they are no where near as bad as Google - Google kills things all the time.

    But with this model, they can actually kill features. When has that ever happened on locally installed MS software? between say Exchange 07 and 10? Sure but installing an update which cripples feature X in the same version? Oh dear.



  • @BRRABill said in Windows 10 Build 14342:

    Waiting for open source banter in 5...4...3......

    Actually, this case applies to Open source too. Anyone who wants to write software to accomplish this same goal is free to, and distribute it anyway they want. It will probably have a lot more options, but the reality is that very few people want this so no one will probably bother to create it.



  • @Dashrender said

    Actually, this case applies to Open source too. Anyone who wants to write software to accomplish this same goal is free to, and distribute it anyway they want. It will probably have a lot more options, but the reality is that very few people want this so no one will probably bother to create it.

    I'm not saying I support open source. I'm just waiting for the banter.



  • @Breffni-Potter said in Windows 10 Build 14342:

    @Dashrender said

    A service we paid for? Are you kidding me?

    Where's my ability to remove the store from Windows 10 pro via GPO?
    Where is X
    Where is Y
    Where is Z

    That's the problem.

    @Dashrender said

    MS removes things from time to time.. they are no where near as bad as Google - Google kills things all the time.

    But with this model, they can actually kill features. When has that ever happened on locally installed MS software? between say Exchange 07 and 10? Sure but installing an update which cripples feature X in the same version? Oh dear.

    Well, they just did that to Windows 7 so I heard - Windows 7 Secure Boot is no longer supported apparently. MS changed a patch from suggested to Important, and since most users have have Important updates install automatically, when the patch was installed, suddenly anyone who use using Secure Boot in the BIOS was no longer able to boot into Windows.



  • @Dashrender said

    Well, they just did that to Windows 7 so I heard

    My point exactly, they've changed direction.



  • @Breffni-Potter said in Windows 10 Build 14342:

    @Dashrender said

    Well, they just did that to Windows 7 so I heard

    My point exactly, they've changed direction.

    Agreed - MS, at least with the Secure Boot, is changing direction. I use so little of the built in option, I can't recall if they have removed things in the past or not.



  • @Dashrender that patch only effected some Asus boards. It's due to how Asus implemented secure boot... which was outside their arrangement with Microsoft... According to a press release/the register's interpretation of it.

    If I can find a link when I get into the office, I'll post it.





  • @scottalanmiller said in Windows 10 Build 14342:

    Sadly it wasn't because "it was the right thing to do" but only because it cost too much to make a feature everyone was ignoring.

    Definitely. The right thing to do, was to never put it in the build in the first place.



  • @nadnerB said in Windows 10 Build 14342:

    Righto, here it is: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/05/06/microsoft_update_asus_windows_7/
    🙂

    Well, this article doesn't really go far enough to say who made the mistake here. Did Asus, by creating their own special personal version of Secure Boot-Like environment that supported Windows 7? So this is really Asus's fault? But MS changed the way some part of Bit locker reporting - so is MS to blame?



  • @Dashrender said in Windows 10 Build 14342:

    @nadnerB said in Windows 10 Build 14342:

    Righto, here it is: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/05/06/microsoft_update_asus_windows_7/
    🙂

    Well, this article doesn't really go far enough to say who made the mistake here. Did Asus, by creating their own special personal version of Secure Boot-Like environment that supported Windows 7? So this is really Asus's fault? But MS changed the way some part of Bit locker reporting - so is MS to blame?

    Welcome to unsecure boot. Just hearing the devs talk about that cluster made me wonder what was going on with it. It's larger and more complicated than an entire OS, all available right in our BIOS code. Nothing bad could happen with that, right?



  • Actually I really like the idea of Secure Boot - kill off Root kits.