Slack Enterprise



  • Anyone looked at using Slack in business for more than 50 users (we have about 120)? Looking at the product, I've wondered about AD integration but have found we might have to use a 3rd party tie in that's paid for (Bitium).

    I did see though that there is an Enterprise version of Slack coming, not sure what it would cost or if it would even be viable. Anyone tried it?

    https://slack.com/pricing



  • have you looked at the free options? Telegram - and there's another one that's been posted around the forums.



  • @Dashrender said:

    have you looked at the free options? Telegram - and there's another one that's been posted around the forums.

    I believe he means Rocket.Chat



  • @Dashrender said:

    have you looked at the free options? Telegram - and there's another one that's been posted around the forums.

    I've checked out Rocket and OpenFire, but not Telegram. Slack and Telegram look awesome, but we would end up going with Rocket Chat since we have to have it on-premise. I'm still keeping and open mind in case that policy changes. 🙂



  • @dafyre said:

    @Dashrender said:

    have you looked at the free options? Telegram - and there's another one that's been posted around the forums.

    I believe he means Rocket.Chat

    Yep, that's the one!



  • @BBigford said:

    @Dashrender said:

    have you looked at the free options? Telegram - and there's another one that's been posted around the forums.

    I've checked out Rocket and OpenFire, but not Telegram. Slack and Telegram look awesome, but we would end up going with Rocket Chat since we have to have it on-premise. I'm still keeping and open mind in case that policy changes. 🙂

    RocketChat is cool. I'm just using it to host a small chat room for family & friends... but it seems like it could really do a lot of stuff.



  • We have a mix of Windows, Linux, and OS X. Is there anything on premise short of Skype for Business that anyone in here is using that is compatible with all 3 platforms for a low to zero cost?

    Edit: ...and on-premise.



  • @BBigford said:

    We have a mix of Windows, Linux, and OS X. Is there anything on premise short of Skype for Business that anyone in here is using that is compatible with all 3 platforms for a low to zero cost?

    Edit: ...and on-premise.

    Rocket.Chat is compatible with all three. Openfire as well.



  • @BBigford said:

    We have a mix of Windows, Linux, and OS X. Is there anything on premise short of Skype for Business that anyone in here is using that is compatible with all 3 platforms for a low to zero cost?

    Edit: ...and on-premise.

    You can install the RocketChat desktop app to get skype-like chat functionality. I know the web version supports video chatting between two people, but I'm unsure as to whether or not you can do group video chats...

    https://github.com/RocketChat/Rocket.Chat/wiki/Using-Face-to-face-video-conference-(aka-webrtc)



  • @coliver said:

    @BBigford said:

    We have a mix of Windows, Linux, and OS X. Is there anything on premise short of Skype for Business that anyone in here is using that is compatible with all 3 platforms for a low to zero cost?

    Edit: ...and on-premise.

    Rocket.Chat is compatible with all three. Openfire as well.

    Did not know that OF is compatible with all 3. I was thinking it still lacked OS X support. Very helpful to know.



  • @BBigford said:

    @coliver said:

    @BBigford said:

    We have a mix of Windows, Linux, and OS X. Is there anything on premise short of Skype for Business that anyone in here is using that is compatible with all 3 platforms for a low to zero cost?

    Edit: ...and on-premise.

    Rocket.Chat is compatible with all three. Openfire as well.

    Did not know that OF is compatible with all 3. I was thinking it still lacked OS X support. Very helpful to know.

    Well... OpenFire is just the server portion. You can connect to it with any XMPP/Jabber client.



  • @coliver said:

    @BBigford said:

    @coliver said:

    @BBigford said:

    We have a mix of Windows, Linux, and OS X. Is there anything on premise short of Skype for Business that anyone in here is using that is compatible with all 3 platforms for a low to zero cost?

    Edit: ...and on-premise.

    Rocket.Chat is compatible with all three. Openfire as well.

    Did not know that OF is compatible with all 3. I was thinking it still lacked OS X support. Very helpful to know.

    Well... OpenFire is just the server portion. You can connect to it with any XMPP/Jabber client.

    Got ahead of myself. I was thinking of Spark as the client when I had OpenFire on the brain since that's all I've really used with OpenFire.



  • @BBigford said:

    @coliver said:

    @BBigford said:

    @coliver said:

    @BBigford said:

    We have a mix of Windows, Linux, and OS X. Is there anything on premise short of Skype for Business that anyone in here is using that is compatible with all 3 platforms for a low to zero cost?

    Edit: ...and on-premise.

    Rocket.Chat is compatible with all three. Openfire as well.

    Did not know that OF is compatible with all 3. I was thinking it still lacked OS X support. Very helpful to know.

    Well... OpenFire is just the server portion. You can connect to it with any XMPP/Jabber client.

    Got ahead of myself. I was thinking of Spark as the client when I had OpenFire on the brain since that's all I've really used with OpenFire.

    Haha, not a big deal. Definitely check out rocket.chat that sounds like it would fit your needs.



  • @dafyre said:

    @BBigford said:

    We have a mix of Windows, Linux, and OS X. Is there anything on premise short of Skype for Business that anyone in here is using that is compatible with all 3 platforms for a low to zero cost?

    Edit: ...and on-premise.

    You can install the RocketChat desktop app to get skype-like chat functionality. I know the web version supports video chatting between two people, but I'm unsure as to whether or not you can do group video chats...

    https://github.com/RocketChat/Rocket.Chat/wiki/Using-Face-to-face-video-conference-(aka-webrtc)

    I know git is very old and a lot of open source software is available from github... How do you use it on Windows? It looks a lot easier to use in Linux but I definitely need to learn it. Do you setup the client on Windows, and create a repository pointing at github? It looks like from your link, a RocketChat repository is in there, with Rocket.Chat being the client that gets installed (available inside the RocketChat repository), is that right? Can you just make a repository pointing at https://github.com so you can pull from anything, rather than setting up a bunch of separate repositories for control over specific software that you need?



  • @BBigford said:

    @dafyre said:

    @BBigford said:

    We have a mix of Windows, Linux, and OS X. Is there anything on premise short of Skype for Business that anyone in here is using that is compatible with all 3 platforms for a low to zero cost?

    Edit: ...and on-premise.

    You can install the RocketChat desktop app to get skype-like chat functionality. I know the web version supports video chatting between two people, but I'm unsure as to whether or not you can do group video chats...

    https://github.com/RocketChat/Rocket.Chat/wiki/Using-Face-to-face-video-conference-(aka-webrtc)

    From their page, they basically tell you to invite a person to a private room and click a button to start the video chat (why does that sound so dirty to me?).

    I know git is very old and a lot of open source software is available from github... How do you use it on Windows? It looks a lot easier to use in Linux but I definitely need to learn it. Do you setup the client on Windows, and create a repository pointing at github? It looks like from your link, a RocketChat repository is in there, with Rocket.Chat being the client that gets installed (available inside the RocketChat repository), is that right? Can you just make a repository pointing at https://github.com so you can pull from anything, rather than setting up a bunch of separate repositories for control over specific software that you need?

    That's not the way github works, because each repo can be public or private and a lot of other things, so no, can't set up a master repo like that... Plus when you clone something it has to download the entire repo... Do you want to download 500 PB of data from Github? lol.



  • Instructions for setting up your own RocketChat VM...

    http://mangolassi.it/topic/8086/installing-rocket-chat-on-centos-7



  • @BBigford Git is the replacement for SVN. It's purpose is to make managing source files easy for developers. Github is just the online version, and is the place to go if you want a clean copy of most open source projects now that other sources..... suck. From your perspective it's just a place to go download software from. You can use the git software to make local copies of public projects from github, but it's just as easy to go download the installer package directly assuming one is available for your platform.



  • @BBigford I'm not sure if you can install the rocket.chat server on Windows. I know you can setup git though.



  • @dafyre said:

    Plus when you clone something it has to download the entire repo... Do you want to download 500 PB of data from Github? lol.

    Haha, eh... forgot about that minor detail. 🙂



  • @coliver said:

    @BBigford I'm not sure if you can install the rocket.chat server on Windows. I know you can setup git though.

    We'd be setting up the server in Linux. I'm just trying to figure out what I need on the github side to understand things. Because from what I've read, Git is for development as travisdh1 had mentioned, and github is just an online source for open source software.



  • @BBigford said:

    @coliver said:

    @BBigford I'm not sure if you can install the rocket.chat server on Windows. I know you can setup git though.

    We'd be setting up the server in Linux. I'm just trying to figure out what I need on the github side to understand things. Because from what I've read, Git is for development as travisdh1 had mentioned, and github is just an online source for open source software.

    Oh I see. If you're using Linux just follow the guide @scottalanmiller created and was linked by @dafyre. You shouldn't have to really setup anything specific as far as git goes.



  • @coliver said:

    @BBigford said:

    @coliver said:

    @BBigford I'm not sure if you can install the rocket.chat server on Windows. I know you can setup git though.

    We'd be setting up the server in Linux. I'm just trying to figure out what I need on the github side to understand things. Because from what I've read, Git is for development as travisdh1 had mentioned, and github is just an online source for open source software.

    Oh I see. If you're using Linux just follow the guide @scottalanmiller created and was linked by @dafyre. You shouldn't have to really setup anything specific as far as git goes.

    Yep. @BBigford Seems to me you're overthinking things. Github is just a place for you to download software from.



  • @travisdh1 said:

    @BBigford Git is the replacement for SVN. It's purpose is to make managing source files easy for developers. Github is just the online version, and is the place to go if you want a clean copy of most open source projects now that other sources..... suck. From your perspective it's just a place to go download software from. You can use the git software to make local copies of public projects from github, but it's just as easy to go download the installer package directly assuming one is available for your platform.

    So you need a local client to download the software, since it is what is reading the .git file for, say, Rocket.Chat? Downloading the .zip it looks like it downloads what, all the source files? Not sure EXACTLY what I'm supposed to do because right now... I'm sucking.



  • @travisdh1 said:

    @coliver said:

    @BBigford said:

    @coliver said:

    @BBigford I'm not sure if you can install the rocket.chat server on Windows. I know you can setup git though.

    We'd be setting up the server in Linux. I'm just trying to figure out what I need on the github side to understand things. Because from what I've read, Git is for development as travisdh1 had mentioned, and github is just an online source for open source software.

    Oh I see. If you're using Linux just follow the guide @scottalanmiller created and was linked by @dafyre. You shouldn't have to really setup anything specific as far as git goes.

    Yep. @BBigford Seems to me you're overthinking things. Github is just a place for you to download software from.

    Yeah, I definitely am.



  • @BBigford said:

    @coliver said:

    @BBigford I'm not sure if you can install the rocket.chat server on Windows. I know you can setup git though.

    We'd be setting up the server in Linux. I'm just trying to figure out what I need on the github side to understand things. Because from what I've read, Git is for development as travisdh1 had mentioned, and github is just an online source for open source software.

    You shouldn't need Github for anything if you're following @scottalanmiller's guide that I linked. His is running on their latest release at the time he wrote it.



  • @dafyre said:

    @BBigford said:

    @coliver said:

    @BBigford I'm not sure if you can install the rocket.chat server on Windows. I know you can setup git though.

    We'd be setting up the server in Linux. I'm just trying to figure out what I need on the github side to understand things. Because from what I've read, Git is for development as travisdh1 had mentioned, and github is just an online source for open source software.

    You shouldn't need Github for anything if you're following @scottalanmiller's guide that I linked. His is running on their latest release at the time he wrote it.

    The inquiry about github is going beyond Rocket.Chat, I'm sure there is lots of other software on there I'll stumble across while on a Windows computer, and would definitely like to know what I need to do to be able to obtain the software properly.



  • @BBigford said:

    @dafyre said:

    @BBigford said:

    @coliver said:

    @BBigford I'm not sure if you can install the rocket.chat server on Windows. I know you can setup git though.

    We'd be setting up the server in Linux. I'm just trying to figure out what I need on the github side to understand things. Because from what I've read, Git is for development as travisdh1 had mentioned, and github is just an online source for open source software.

    You shouldn't need Github for anything if you're following @scottalanmiller's guide that I linked. His is running on their latest release at the time he wrote it.

    The inquiry about github is going beyond Rocket.Chat, I'm sure there is lots of other software on there I'll stumble across while on a Windows computer, and would definitely like to know what I need to do to be able to obtain the software properly.

    Generally go download the .msi or .exe. Really, that's it.



  • @travisdh1 said:

    @BBigford said:

    @dafyre said:

    @BBigford said:

    @coliver said:

    @BBigford I'm not sure if you can install the rocket.chat server on Windows. I know you can setup git though.

    We'd be setting up the server in Linux. I'm just trying to figure out what I need on the github side to understand things. Because from what I've read, Git is for development as travisdh1 had mentioned, and github is just an online source for open source software.

    You shouldn't need Github for anything if you're following @scottalanmiller's guide that I linked. His is running on their latest release at the time he wrote it.

    The inquiry about github is going beyond Rocket.Chat, I'm sure there is lots of other software on there I'll stumble across while on a Windows computer, and would definitely like to know what I need to do to be able to obtain the software properly.

    Generally go download the .msi or .exe. Really, that's it.

    I must be overlooking something, because I don't see those extensions. I'll keep looking. Thanks!



  • @travisdh1 said:

    @BBigford said:

    @dafyre said:

    @BBigford said:

    @coliver said:

    @BBigford I'm not sure if you can install the rocket.chat server on Windows. I know you can setup git though.

    We'd be setting up the server in Linux. I'm just trying to figure out what I need on the github side to understand things. Because from what I've read, Git is for development as travisdh1 had mentioned, and github is just an online source for open source software.

    You shouldn't need Github for anything if you're following @scottalanmiller's guide that I linked. His is running on their latest release at the time he wrote it.

    The inquiry about github is going beyond Rocket.Chat, I'm sure there is lots of other software on there I'll stumble across while on a Windows computer, and would definitely like to know what I need to do to be able to obtain the software properly.

    Generally go download the .msi or .exe. Really, that's it.

    I was definitely overthinking the simple install. Looks like you can't download the software directly from github, but instead you get redirected to the software's site? In this case, https://rocket.chat


  • Vendor

    @BBigford said:

    slack

    We just adopted it. its how 90% of my team's communication is done. Its good for teams, less good for 20K users.

    /giphy is the greatest integration ever.


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