Ubiquiti AP for Home



  • Just ordered one. Figured "go high or go home" as we say. Our current wireless is located in the basement and does not service the upstairs well at all. We figured that a nice, powerful, wall mount enterprise unit in the middle of the house would do the trick nicely.



  • link us to what you bought.



  • This is the UniFi AP
    http://www.ubnt.com/unifi#ap

    I buy from Baltic Networks but Amazon has the same price lately.



  • If you want to see what you can do with the controller sometime, let me know I can do a screen share session to show you. I don't have any doing anything super special, but I do have a bunch out in the wild.



  • Do you need a controller, or are they standalone?



  • Controller is software that you can load "anywhere." We support them for clients but having at home is pretty sweet.



  • @Aaron-Studer said:

    Do you need a controller, or are they standalone?

    You HAVE to use the controller to configure it. But once configured it never needs to talk to it again if you don't want. But why not? Only down side is the Java requirement for the device running the controller. I really hope they migrate away from that soon.

    image.jpg



  • So what did you buy?



  • The standard UniFi AP. The entry level unit. But entry level with Ubiquiti is pretty serious stuff.



  • image.jpg



  • Aw, shucks! You should have said something before you bought it. Those things have been a pain for our clients.



  • @alexntg said:

    Aw, shucks! You should have said something before you bought it. Those things have been a pain for our clients.

    I have them all over the place and they have been working great.



  • @JaredBusch said:

    @alexntg said:

    Aw, shucks! You should have said something before you bought it. Those things have been a pain for our clients.

    I have them all over the place and they have been working great.

    Our clients are having issues with them randomly going offline until power cycled.



  • Alex, aren't your clients Scott's clients?

    what would you recommend?



  • @alexntg said:

    @JaredBusch said:

    @alexntg said:

    Aw, shucks! You should have said something before you bought it. Those things have been a pain for our clients.

    I have them all over the place and they have been working great.

    Our clients are having issues with them randomly going offline until power cycled.

    Has the vendor been engaged?



  • @Dashrender said:

    Alex, aren't your clients Scott's clients?

    what would you recommend?

    For advanced-user home use? Netgear makes some reasonable entry-level business APs. For the Apple-oriented household, Apple AirPorts can be configured for AP mode. If you're looking to go all-out with features like captive portals, VLANs, and central management, a jump up to Meraki may be an option, if one plans to get some heavy use out of it.



  • I haven't dug into any of those yet, but what makes them better than Ubiquiti?



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    @alexntg said:

    @JaredBusch said:

    @alexntg said:

    Aw, shucks! You should have said something before you bought it. Those things have been a pain for our clients.

    I have them all over the place and they have been working great.

    Our clients are having issues with them randomly going offline until power cycled.

    Has the vendor been engaged?

    Not at present. In one case, they're also seeing poor performance with Mac clients for no explicable reason. In this case, they're considering replacing them with something else, though are having us look into the Mac issue in the interim.



  • @alexntg said:

    @Dashrender said:

    Alex, aren't your clients Scott's clients?

    what would you recommend?

    For advanced-user home use? Netgear makes some reasonable entry-level business APs. For the Apple-oriented household, Apple AirPorts can be configured for AP mode. If you're looking to go all-out with features like captive portals, VLANs, and central management, a jump up to Meraki may be an option, if one plans to get some heavy use out of it.

    The Airport can have a guest Network enabled. The VLAN is hard coded as 1003 and not changeable. I have it set up at my house.



  • @Dashrender said:

    I haven't dug into any of those yet, but what makes them better than Ubiquiti?

    Not to be a smartass, but not locking up is a great start. There's nothing special or amazing about the Netgear APs. The Apple products just run; I've had mine for 4 years and haven't had a single issue with it so far. They do, however, require a separate configuration utility, which may or may not be a good thing, depending on personal preference.



  • weird I haven't had any issues with my ubiquiti products out in the wild. Is this issue at one client in particular? If so I'd check out the config.



  • I use a MacBook Pro and have no problems when I am at the clients that I have put in a UniFi AP.



  • @alexntg said:

    @Dashrender said:

    Alex, aren't your clients Scott's clients?

    what would you recommend?

    For advanced-user home use? Netgear makes some reasonable entry-level business APs. For the Apple-oriented household, Apple AirPorts can be configured for AP mode. If you're looking to go all-out with features like captive portals, VLANs, and central management, a jump up to Meraki may be an option, if one plans to get some heavy use out of it.

    I've has great luck with Netgear ProSafe APs. I've had Apple Aurport too but found them to be unreliable. And very overpriced.


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