Version Control for IT



  • How many of you are using some sort of version control for IT (not for software development.) In the software world we used it continuously, obviously. But in IT I see it used very rarely. NTG just implemented Subversion over the weekend to start putting our configuration files under version control. I've used both Subversion and GIT quite a bit in software engineering roles. I'm seeing Subversion used more and more especially as the use of frameworks like Puppet and Chef take off.



  • Depending on the environment, I use tools like SCCM, LANDesk, VMware Horizon View, and Group Policy. They all allow for a test group to be run prior to going into production.



  • Not the same idea. With SVN, for example, we can look up changes over time, do rollbacks, see who committed changes, deploy to other systems, do comparisons.

    Both are good to have but version control is a different thing than those technologies.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    Not the same idea. With SVN, for example, we can look up changes over time, do rollbacks, see who committed changes, deploy to other systems, do comparisons.

    Both are good to have but version control is a different thing than those technologies.

    I'm not sure about device comparison, but LANDesk does the remainder. It logs every action taken. if you push out a bad patch or package, you can roll it back/call the uninstaller.



  • @alexntg said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    Not the same idea. With SVN, for example, we can look up changes over time, do rollbacks, see who committed changes, deploy to other systems, do comparisons.

    Both are good to have but version control is a different thing than those technologies.

    I'm not sure about device comparison, but LANDesk does the remainder. It logs every action taken. if you push out a bad patch or package, you can roll it back/call the uninstaller.

    That's pretty nice. Not free though 🙂



  • I've contemplated doing svn over git. But at the moment I don't make enough changes to justify going through the process of setting it up for my documentation and script repository. My NAS can serve svn and git, I'm just lazy 😉

    All of my major network and config changes are notes in my sw install ATM.



  • So easy to get going if you have it on a NAS like that.



  • I am personally more familiar with svn than with git, but I use both. I setup a SVN server for our company a few years back as I felt it was easier for novice developers to understand. I still have issues because some people simply do not grasp the concept of the repository or what it is doing.



  • Now that GIT is a primary means of deploying software, it is getting more and more important to understand how it works. MangoLassi is actually deployed via GIT.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    @alexntg said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    Not the same idea. With SVN, for example, we can look up changes over time, do rollbacks, see who committed changes, deploy to other systems, do comparisons.

    Both are good to have but version control is a different thing than those technologies.

    I'm not sure about device comparison, but LANDesk does the remainder. It logs every action taken. if you push out a bad patch or package, you can roll it back/call the uninstaller.

    That's pretty nice. Not free though 🙂

    What's it matter if it's free? If it can save a few techs' worth of salary per year and makes managing thousands of computers much easier, it's paid for itself.


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