setting up CentOS and Mediawiki



  • @scottalanmiller , I found your instructions here and am trying to install Mediawiki.

    I've gotten to service mysqld start; mysql_secure_installation and I'm seeing the following:

    Enter current password for root (enter for non): so I entered my root password for CentOS which returned
    ERROR 1045 (28000): Access denied for user 'root'@'localhost' (using password: YES)

    after several failed attempts I received the following after just pressing enter (at least I don't think I typed the password)
    OK, successfully used password, moving on...

    Setting the root password ensures that nobody can log into the MYSQL root user without the proper authorisation.

    Set root password? [Y/n]

    so I'm lost, where the first prompts really wanting the linux root password, and now I'm being prompted to create a separate SQL root password?



  • @Dashrender They are separate entries. Elastix is the same way. MySQL root is different than the regular root. You can use the same password but they're separate accounts.



  • To change the root password, btw, if you want to, command is sudo passwd. If you want to enter full root mode, enter su and it will prompt you for the root password. Then you have full root privileges for every command. Just be careful doing this as a wrong variable or an extra character where it doesn't belong and your system can get hosed.



  • I'm fine with them being separate, but it seemed like the system wasn't accepting my root password to authenticate the install or something, but simply pressing ENTER bypassed it.

    Though I suppose I could have typed it in correctly the third time and just can't remember for sure since there is little to no feedback...



  • @Dashrender Yea, for security they do that. Its got its pros and cons. I like it but agree that not being able to see the character stars for at least a character count as they are being typed does make it a little harder. Those used to pure Windows environments always get freaked out by this the first time.



  • LOL.. I'm definitely not freaked out... I've installed linux before and know about the 'no feedback is good feedback' situation.

    The lack of stars just makes it more difficult to know if you even entered a password at all?

    I've moved on and put in a new SQL password. That part seems to be finished.



  • @dashrender Wasn't saying you were. Just in general. I know I was the first time I ever entered a CLI password in Linux. I was wondering if my keyboard was working and all that. LOL
    As far as things go, awesome! Keep going!

    9326-just-keep-swimming.png



  • MySQL is a database. It needs it's own credentials. Same as SQL Server or Oracle or whatever.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    MySQL is a database. It needs it's own credentials. Same as SQL Server or Oracle or whatever.

    I was more concerned over the fact that it appeared to be asking me to login as root to start the install of SQL, but then seemed to allow me to bypass it..
    but again, maybe I just typed the password in and don't recall, and typed it in correctly the third time.



  • @scottalanmiller With SQL though you can link it to AD as most do. Oracle is a different beast...



  • @scottalanmiller

    It might be helpful for other people like myself that find and use your guide to install Mediawiki on CentOS if you add

    Yum list 'mediawiki*' so people can find the name of the current version. *but now that I run it, it appears that yum does not have the current version 1.22.3



  • @Dashrender You may be able to add another repo to pull it from. I believe the .repo files go in /etc/yum.repos.d/ if I remember right.



  • @Dashrender said:

    @scottalanmiller

    It might be helpful for other people like myself that find and use your guide to install Mediawiki on CentOS if you add

    Yum list 'mediawiki*' so people can find the name of the current version. *but now that I run it, it appears that yum does not have the current version 1.22.3

    It would not have the latest. That's not how CentOS works. They don't change release versions once the OS is out. This is enterprise server here, not an SMB system. This is anything but bleeding edge. Every package is frozen for ultimate stability.



  • @ajstringham said:

    @Dashrender You may be able to add another repo to pull it from. I believe the .repo files go in /etc/yum.repos.d/ if I remember right.

    They do but you might as well run Fedora if you are going to go down this route. Running CentOS this way would be foolish.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    @ajstringham said:

    @Dashrender You may be able to add another repo to pull it from. I believe the .repo files go in /etc/yum.repos.d/ if I remember right.

    They do but you might as well run Fedora if you are going to go down this route. Running CentOS this way would be foolish.

    Why would running CentOS this way be foolish?



  • I'm also setting this up inside an ESXi VM.. do I need to install VM tools?



  • @Dashrender said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @ajstringham said:

    @Dashrender You may be able to add another repo to pull it from. I believe the .repo files go in /etc/yum.repos.d/ if I remember right.

    They do but you might as well run Fedora if you are going to go down this route. Running CentOS this way would be foolish.

    Why would running CentOS this way be foolish?

    There is a purpose to CentOS focused on stability. If you want bleeding edge don't shoehorn that into CentOS. It isn't built for it. You'll just increase risk. You are trying to mix concepts. Fedora is bleeding edge and all the parts match. CentOS is for stability and all the parts match. Don't mix and match or you make it worse than if you had chosen either / or.



  • @Dashrender said:

    I'm also setting this up inside an ESXi VM.. do I need to install VM tools?

    Yes