The Great Pizza Debate...



  • Hello all,

    Help settle and argument here:

    If you have pizza delivered Thursday, and then eat a slice of that pizza on Friday, is it Thursday's pizza or Friday's pizza?



  • @GlennBarley

    Good question..

    Answer:

    Tasty with beer.



  • Did the delivery guy make a special trip to give you that slice of pizza?

    No; OKAY it's from Thursday, it's left overs. It's not a new pizza, end of argument.



  • @GlennBarley said:
    is it Thursday's pizza or Friday's pizza?

    Yes



  • @DustinB3403 No he did not. It was in the fridge.



  • The it's pizza from . . . . . .

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    .

    THURSDAY and it therefor Thursday's pizza as it's left overs.



  • Thursday's Pizza. The date of pizza is directly linked to the date the pizza was baked. I even go further in saying getting a pizza while out drinking at 2 am Friday, while drinking started on Thursday night, would still be considered Thursday's pizza if you were warming it back up to attempt to cure a hangover Friday afternoon.



  • This is a simple question. The answer is this: If I bought the pizza on Thursday, it will be gone before Friday.



  • Here's the general arguments for each side. It helps to have context:

    One group said that it was “Thursday’s pizza” with their argument being that because it was originally created and/or intended to be eaten on that day, it will always belong to that day (i.e. You’re eating Thursday’s pizza on Friday). This group what somewhat fractured because each person had slightly different ideas about whether it should be based on creation or original intent (“What if I made a pizza on Wednesday night that was intended to be eaten on Thursday but didn’t actually get touched until Friday?”). Because creation date could be a hard fact to prove, and intent is easily changed at any given point, there was a bit of indecision about which factor should actually determine the result. Still, they held strong with that theory.

    The other group said that it was “Friday’s pizza” because the eating of the pizza is the primary action that each person takes with the pizza, therefore it is more important and tangible than the creation date or original intent (i.e. If I schedule a meeting for Thursday, but the stakeholders are busy and I change it to Friday, it is now Friday’s meeting). This group was united in the idea that the whole situation was relative to each person’s interaction with the pizza. The slices they ate on Thursday were Thursday’s pizza, and the slices they ate on Friday were Friday’s pizza, regardless of when they were created or originally intended to be eaten.



  • @Baustin213 said:

    Here's the general arguments for each side. It helps to have context:

    This group what somewhat fractured because each person had slightly different ideas about whether it should be based on creation or original intent (“What if I made a pizza on Wednesday night that was intended to be eaten on Thursday but didn’t actually get touched until Friday?”).

    What? Who the hell thinks like this?

    The other group said that it was “Friday’s pizza” because the eating of the pizza is the primary action that each person takes with the pizza, therefore it is more important and tangible than the creation date or original intent (i.e. If I schedule a meeting for Thursday, but the stakeholders are busy and I change it to Friday, it is now Friday’s meeting). This group was united in the idea that the whole situation was relative to each person’s interaction with the pizza. The slices they ate on Thursday were Thursday’s pizza, and the slices they ate on Friday were Friday’s pizza, regardless of when they were created or originally intended to be eaten.

    And these people are just plain insane. "I'm eating it today so it's today's pizza" like wth? It was paid for / made / delivered or picked up on Thursday. It's also left overs from the day before.

    It is Thursday's pizza as left overs on Friday.

    Give me facts that prove otherwise.



  • Yeaaaaaaaaah I'd just call it pizza, I have never said it's <day of the week> pizza. Now, if somebody asked me when I bought the pizza, if it was on a Thursday............Then regardless of whether or not I ate the pizza the following Wednesday, it'd still be purchased/acquired on Thursday....
    Thus I suppose if one names pizza by the day of the week it is, it'd be Thursdays pizza since the pizza was essentially born on that date.



  • If you drink 2 week old milk, it's not "today's milk". Ergo, it's not "Friday's pizza". You're denoting freshness, not what day today is.



  • @DustinB3403 We also just drank from the keggerator today. The beer was paid for/made/delivered a while ago. The beer that people drank on Wednesday was Wednesday's beer. The beer that they drank today was Friday's beer. It's pretty simple.

    Same idea with an event. If I schedule a meeting for Thursday but nobody can attend the initial time so I change it to Friday, it is then Friday's meeting.

    Think of it as each day being an actual person. If Mr. Thursday has pizza, then he leaves and gives it to Mr. Friday, it is now in Mr. Friday's possession and is therefore Mr. Friday's pizza.

    Say it's illegal drugs. If Mr. Thursday has a bunch of illegal drugs. Then he hangs out with Mr. Friday, and when Mr. Friday leaves he has the illegal drugs in his possession. On his way home, Mr. Friday gets pulled over by a police officer who finds the drugs. Mr. Friday isn't going to be able to get away with saying, "Oh no, these are Mr. Thursday's drugs."

    Regardless of initial intent, it is now in Friday's possession.



  • @Baustin213 You clearly fall into the second category of people I was mentioning above.....


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