iPhone: weak Wi-Fi leads to hefty bill.



  • San Francisco teen Ashton Finegold was floored when his dad told him he had racked up a $2,000 phone bill in one month by going over his plan's data cap.

    http://www.aol.com/article/2016/01/13/cautionary-tale-this-iphone-feature-lead-to-a-2000-monthly-bil/21296625/?ncid=txtlnkusaolp00000058&intcmp=hplnws



  • Bad decision on Apple's part to have it on by default.


  • Service Provider

    @brianlittlejohn said:

    Bad decision on Apple's part to have it on by default.

    Bullshit. Bad parenting. It is impossible to unknowingly blow over you cell plan package with any of the top 4 carriers. The parent willingly ignored notices.

    From the article.
    gPXGyO6.jpg



  • Eh.... well I can see how it would be incredibly annoying to not have service.. but really this is on the family for having crap WiFi coverage.


  • Service Provider

    @brianlittlejohn said:

    Bad decision on Apple's part to have it on by default.

    Also, like any Apple hater will point out, Android has had this feature for a while. Apple did not invent it.



  • Didn't read the article, but when the first mentioned this feature in one of the iOS 7 beta's i thought it was a bad idea to have it on by default.



  • @JaredBusch I fail to see how I implied apple invented it...



  • @brianlittlejohn said:

    Didn't read the article, but when the first mentioned this feature in one of the iOS 7 beta's i thought it was a bad idea to have it on by default.

    This is disabled by default on Android (at least it is on my phone / carrier... Verizon Galaxy Note 4).



  • @JaredBusch said:

    @brianlittlejohn said:

    Bad decision on Apple's part to have it on by default.

    Bullshit. Bad parenting. It is impossible to unknowingly blow over you cell plan package with any of the top 4 carriers. The parent willingly ignored notices.

    From the article.
    gPXGyO6.jpg

    That is his own damn fault then.



  • @JaredBusch said:

    @brianlittlejohn said:

    Bad decision on Apple's part to have it on by default.

    Bullshit. Bad parenting. It is impossible to unknowingly blow over you cell plan package with any of the top 4 carriers. The parent willingly ignored notices.

    From the article.
    gPXGyO6.jpg

    This is why some people just shouldn't use technology. All the click happy Windows users with 100 toolbars got cell phones and this type of crap happens.


  • Service Provider

    This took a lot of missteps for this to happen, which is why this one kid made the news.

    • Using his phone as an entertainment device (not a mistake, but a requirement here was that he wasn't using a tablet, computer or other device.)
    • Didn't check his settings.
    • Has AT&T
    • Has a capped plan on AT&T
    • Got an alert that the above was going to be a problem and decided to wait till the bill came to see how bad it would be.
    • Has a capped plan and does not manually check his usage.
    • Leaves his cell radio on when he is intending to be on WiFi (I turn mine off for better call quality and battery life and to prevent accidents like this.)

    None of those alone is a big mistake. But combine them all, you have a risk of big issues. It took quite a bit of not caring and putting in zero effort to get to where they ended up.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    None of those alone is a big mistake. But combine them all, you have a risk of big issues. It took quite a bit of not caring and putting in zero effort to get to where they ended up.

    The Swiss Cheese Theory.



  • I believe everyone is at fault here, the son, the father, and AT&T. Everyone already mentioned why the father and son our at fault, but AT&T should have proactive monitors that send out redflags once a data bill hits a certain threshold. Especially if the family's typical phone bill is $150 and all the sudden is $2000. That should send a redflag somewhere and something should be done to ensure the customer really wants to accept the outrageous data charges.


  • Service Provider

    @IRJ said:

    I believe everyone is at fault here, the son, the father, and AT&T. Everyone already mentioned why the father and son our at fault, but AT&T should have proactive monitors that send out redflags once a data bill hits a certain threshold. Especially if the family's typical phone bill is $150 and all the sudden is $2000. That should send a redflag somewhere and something should be done to ensure the customer really wants to accept the outrageous data charges.

    But they did, right?



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    @IRJ said:

    I believe everyone is at fault here, the son, the father, and AT&T. Everyone already mentioned why the father and son our at fault, but AT&T should have proactive monitors that send out redflags once a data bill hits a certain threshold. Especially if the family's typical phone bill is $150 and all the sudden is $2000. That should send a redflag somewhere and something should be done to ensure the customer really wants to accept the outrageous data charges.

    But they did, right?

    a single text message


  • Service Provider

    @IRJ said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @IRJ said:

    I believe everyone is at fault here, the son, the father, and AT&T. Everyone already mentioned why the father and son our at fault, but AT&T should have proactive monitors that send out redflags once a data bill hits a certain threshold. Especially if the family's typical phone bill is $150 and all the sudden is $2000. That should send a redflag somewhere and something should be done to ensure the customer really wants to accept the outrageous data charges.

    But they did, right?

    a single text message

    how much hounding does one need. The message was sent and received and they didn't care. I don't see how AT&T has any more responsibility here. They have the status on the phone itself, they have an account status AND a courtesy, but unnecessary, text alert that they were being foolish. How many layers must AT&T do?



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    @IRJ said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @IRJ said:

    I believe everyone is at fault here, the son, the father, and AT&T. Everyone already mentioned why the father and son our at fault, but AT&T should have proactive monitors that send out redflags once a data bill hits a certain threshold. Especially if the family's typical phone bill is $150 and all the sudden is $2000. That should send a redflag somewhere and something should be done to ensure the customer really wants to accept the outrageous data charges.

    But they did, right?

    a single text message

    how much hounding does one need. The message was sent and received and they didn't care. I don't see how AT&T has any more responsibility here. They have the status on the phone itself, they have an account status AND a courtesy, but unnecessary, text alert that they were being foolish. How many layers must AT&T do?

    I would think an alert at every GB over the limit would be appreciated by customers.



  • @BRRABill said:

    The Swiss Cheese Theory.

    A phrase taken from this article, which is one of the best articles I think I've ever read (it won a Pulitzer that year), and also one of the most heartbreaking as a parent.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/02/27/AR2009022701549_pf.html


  • Service Provider

    @IRJ said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @IRJ said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @IRJ said:

    I believe everyone is at fault here, the son, the father, and AT&T. Everyone already mentioned why the father and son our at fault, but AT&T should have proactive monitors that send out redflags once a data bill hits a certain threshold. Especially if the family's typical phone bill is $150 and all the sudden is $2000. That should send a redflag somewhere and something should be done to ensure the customer really wants to accept the outrageous data charges.

    But they did, right?

    a single text message

    how much hounding does one need. The message was sent and received and they didn't care. I don't see how AT&T has any more responsibility here. They have the status on the phone itself, they have an account status AND a courtesy, but unnecessary, text alert that they were being foolish. How many layers must AT&T do?

    I would think an alert at every GB over the limit would be appreciated by customers.

    I don't think that it would. Maybe some, but only some. And whether or not it would be appreciated doesn't in any way make AT&T at fault.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    @IRJ said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @IRJ said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @IRJ said:

    I believe everyone is at fault here, the son, the father, and AT&T. Everyone already mentioned why the father and son our at fault, but AT&T should have proactive monitors that send out redflags once a data bill hits a certain threshold. Especially if the family's typical phone bill is $150 and all the sudden is $2000. That should send a redflag somewhere and something should be done to ensure the customer really wants to accept the outrageous data charges.

    But they did, right?

    a single text message

    how much hounding does one need. The message was sent and received and they didn't care. I don't see how AT&T has any more responsibility here. They have the status on the phone itself, they have an account status AND a courtesy, but unnecessary, text alert that they were being foolish. How many layers must AT&T do?

    I would think an alert at every GB over the limit would be appreciated by customers.

    I don't think that it would. Maybe some, but only some. And whether or not it would be appreciated doesn't in any way make AT&T at fault.

    What I would like to see is companies give their customers the options of what to do when data runs out.

    "You have met your data cap What would you like to do?"

    1. Continue using data (warning, you will be charged per GB of data you use!)
    2. Upgrade to next tier of data plan
    3. Disable data until your next billing cycle.

    I get text messages from Verizon at 75, 80, and 95%, so that is kinda option 1. They actually offer the upgrade to next data tier option via text message, but not the option to disable my data.


  • Service Provider

    @dafyre said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @IRJ said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @IRJ said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @IRJ said:

    I believe everyone is at fault here, the son, the father, and AT&T. Everyone already mentioned why the father and son our at fault, but AT&T should have proactive monitors that send out redflags once a data bill hits a certain threshold. Especially if the family's typical phone bill is $150 and all the sudden is $2000. That should send a redflag somewhere and something should be done to ensure the customer really wants to accept the outrageous data charges.

    But they did, right?

    a single text message

    how much hounding does one need. The message was sent and received and they didn't care. I don't see how AT&T has any more responsibility here. They have the status on the phone itself, they have an account status AND a courtesy, but unnecessary, text alert that they were being foolish. How many layers must AT&T do?

    I would think an alert at every GB over the limit would be appreciated by customers.

    I don't think that it would. Maybe some, but only some. And whether or not it would be appreciated doesn't in any way make AT&T at fault.

    What I would like to see is companies give their customers the options of what to do when data runs out.

    "You have met your data cap What would you like to do?"

    1. Continue using data (warning, you will be charged per GB of data you use!)
    2. Upgrade to next tier of data plan
    3. Disable data until your next billing cycle.

    I get text messages from Verizon at 75, 80, and 95%, so that is kinda option 1. They actually offer the upgrade to next data tier option via text message, but not the option to disable my data.

    But I can do all of that with my phone now, right? It would be a redundant service?



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    I don't think that it would. Maybe some, but only some. And whether or not it would be appreciated doesn't in any way make AT&T at fault.

    When we get the first text (at nearing 75%) in our family we go into crazy mode. :)


  • Service Provider

    @IRJ said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @IRJ said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @IRJ said:

    I believe everyone is at fault here, the son, the father, and AT&T. Everyone already mentioned why the father and son our at fault, but AT&T should have proactive monitors that send out redflags once a data bill hits a certain threshold. Especially if the family's typical phone bill is $150 and all the sudden is $2000. That should send a redflag somewhere and something should be done to ensure the customer really wants to accept the outrageous data charges.

    But they did, right?

    a single text message

    how much hounding does one need. The message was sent and received and they didn't care. I don't see how AT&T has any more responsibility here. They have the status on the phone itself, they have an account status AND a courtesy, but unnecessary, text alert that they were being foolish. How many layers must AT&T do?

    I would think an alert at every GB over the limit would be appreciated by customers.

    I would think that anyone who cared about their bill would be watching their usage after seeing that warning. Once again, not AT&T's fault. Everyone needs to stop being a victim and take some personal responsibility. For AT&T to send any notification at all is a courtesy to the customer. You know what your terms of service are. You know what the cost is if you go above the limit. That's not their problem. They offer the service and you pay them for what you use. That's where it ends. If you can't be bothered to pay attention and monitor your own use of the service that you alone are responsible to pay for, why is it their job to be your babysitter?



  • The only ting would be if the kid ran it all up at once.

    I mean, who of us hasn't given a device to a kid.

    I have. I have.


  • Service Provider

    @BRRABill said:

    The only ting would be if the kid ran it all up at once.

    I mean, who of us hasn't given a device to a kid.

    I have. I have.

    Fine. But, if you hand a device to a kid, you just owned the responsibility for whatever they do with it. Of course there are limitations to that statement, but I'm sure you get what I mean.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    @dafyre said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @IRJ said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @IRJ said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @IRJ said:

    I believe everyone is at fault here, the son, the father, and AT&T. Everyone already mentioned why the father and son our at fault, but AT&T should have proactive monitors that send out redflags once a data bill hits a certain threshold. Especially if the family's typical phone bill is $150 and all the sudden is $2000. That should send a redflag somewhere and something should be done to ensure the customer really wants to accept the outrageous data charges.

    But they did, right?

    a single text message

    how much hounding does one need. The message was sent and received and they didn't care. I don't see how AT&T has any more responsibility here. They have the status on the phone itself, they have an account status AND a courtesy, but unnecessary, text alert that they were being foolish. How many layers must AT&T do?

    I would think an alert at every GB over the limit would be appreciated by customers.

    I don't think that it would. Maybe some, but only some. And whether or not it would be appreciated doesn't in any way make AT&T at fault.

    What I would like to see is companies give their customers the options of what to do when data runs out.

    "You have met your data cap What would you like to do?"

    1. Continue using data (warning, you will be charged per GB of data you use!)
    2. Upgrade to next tier of data plan
    3. Disable data until your next billing cycle.

    I get text messages from Verizon at 75, 80, and 95%, so that is kinda option 1. They actually offer the upgrade to next data tier option via text message, but not the option to disable my data.

    But I can do all of that with my phone now, right? It would be a redundant service?

    You say that like redundancy is a bad thing. :-P

    And sure -- you and I know how to go into our phones and turn off the data bits until we want them on. However, the average user may or may not know this. If the carrier can do it, why not let them do it for those who can't be bothered to do it, or don't know how to google for it?



  • @art_of_shred said:

    Fine. But, if you hand a device to a kid, you just owned the responsibility for whatever they do with it. Of course there are limitations to that statement, but I'm sure you get what I mean.

    Have you ever been with a screaming kid in a restaurant?

    I'll take the $2K bill.

    :)


  • Service Provider

    @dafyre said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @dafyre said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @IRJ said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @IRJ said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @IRJ said:

    I believe everyone is at fault here, the son, the father, and AT&T. Everyone already mentioned why the father and son our at fault, but AT&T should have proactive monitors that send out redflags once a data bill hits a certain threshold. Especially if the family's typical phone bill is $150 and all the sudden is $2000. That should send a redflag somewhere and something should be done to ensure the customer really wants to accept the outrageous data charges.

    But they did, right?

    a single text message

    how much hounding does one need. The message was sent and received and they didn't care. I don't see how AT&T has any more responsibility here. They have the status on the phone itself, they have an account status AND a courtesy, but unnecessary, text alert that they were being foolish. How many layers must AT&T do?

    I would think an alert at every GB over the limit would be appreciated by customers.

    I don't think that it would. Maybe some, but only some. And whether or not it would be appreciated doesn't in any way make AT&T at fault.

    What I would like to see is companies give their customers the options of what to do when data runs out.

    "You have met your data cap What would you like to do?"

    1. Continue using data (warning, you will be charged per GB of data you use!)
    2. Upgrade to next tier of data plan
    3. Disable data until your next billing cycle.

    I get text messages from Verizon at 75, 80, and 95%, so that is kinda option 1. They actually offer the upgrade to next data tier option via text message, but not the option to disable my data.

    But I can do all of that with my phone now, right? It would be a redundant service?

    You say that like redundancy is a bad thing. :-P

    And sure -- you and I know how to go into our phones and turn off the data bits until we want them on. However, the average user may or may not know this. If the carrier can do it, why not let them do it for those who can't be bothered to do it, or don't know how to google for it?

    Because it isn't their job to do it ;)



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    @dafyre said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @dafyre said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @IRJ said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @IRJ said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @IRJ said:

    I believe everyone is at fault here, the son, the father, and AT&T. Everyone already mentioned why the father and son our at fault, but AT&T should have proactive monitors that send out redflags once a data bill hits a certain threshold. Especially if the family's typical phone bill is $150 and all the sudden is $2000. That should send a redflag somewhere and something should be done to ensure the customer really wants to accept the outrageous data charges.

    But they did, right?

    a single text message

    how much hounding does one need. The message was sent and received and they didn't care. I don't see how AT&T has any more responsibility here. They have the status on the phone itself, they have an account status AND a courtesy, but unnecessary, text alert that they were being foolish. How many layers must AT&T do?

    I would think an alert at every GB over the limit would be appreciated by customers.

    I don't think that it would. Maybe some, but only some. And whether or not it would be appreciated doesn't in any way make AT&T at fault.

    What I would like to see is companies give their customers the options of what to do when data runs out.

    "You have met your data cap What would you like to do?"

    1. Continue using data (warning, you will be charged per GB of data you use!)
    2. Upgrade to next tier of data plan
    3. Disable data until your next billing cycle.

    I get text messages from Verizon at 75, 80, and 95%, so that is kinda option 1. They actually offer the upgrade to next data tier option via text message, but not the option to disable my data.

    But I can do all of that with my phone now, right? It would be a redundant service?

    You say that like redundancy is a bad thing. :-P

    And sure -- you and I know how to go into our phones and turn off the data bits until we want them on. However, the average user may or may not know this. If the carrier can do it, why not let them do it for those who can't be bothered to do it, or don't know how to google for it?

    Because it isn't their job to do it ;)

    Why isn't it? They are the service provider. They would come out the hero in this case. AT & T could have "saved" their customer from their kid and disabled data, rather than giving the customer a heart attack by way of a $2k bill.



  • @dafyre said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @dafyre said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @dafyre said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @IRJ said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @IRJ said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @IRJ said:

    I believe everyone is at fault here, the son, the father, and AT&T. Everyone already mentioned why the father and son our at fault, but AT&T should have proactive monitors that send out redflags once a data bill hits a certain threshold. Especially if the family's typical phone bill is $150 and all the sudden is $2000. That should send a redflag somewhere and something should be done to ensure the customer really wants to accept the outrageous data charges.

    But they did, right?

    a single text message

    how much hounding does one need. The message was sent and received and they didn't care. I don't see how AT&T has any more responsibility here. They have the status on the phone itself, they have an account status AND a courtesy, but unnecessary, text alert that they were being foolish. How many layers must AT&T do?

    I would think an alert at every GB over the limit would be appreciated by customers.

    I don't think that it would. Maybe some, but only some. And whether or not it would be appreciated doesn't in any way make AT&T at fault.

    What I would like to see is companies give their customers the options of what to do when data runs out.

    "You have met your data cap What would you like to do?"

    1. Continue using data (warning, you will be charged per GB of data you use!)
    2. Upgrade to next tier of data plan
    3. Disable data until your next billing cycle.

    I get text messages from Verizon at 75, 80, and 95%, so that is kinda option 1. They actually offer the upgrade to next data tier option via text message, but not the option to disable my data.

    But I can do all of that with my phone now, right? It would be a redundant service?

    You say that like redundancy is a bad thing. :-P

    And sure -- you and I know how to go into our phones and turn off the data bits until we want them on. However, the average user may or may not know this. If the carrier can do it, why not let them do it for those who can't be bothered to do it, or don't know how to google for it?

    Because it isn't their job to do it ;)

    Why isn't it? They are the service provider. They would come out the hero in this case. AT & T could have "saved" their customer from their kid and disabled data, rather than giving the customer a heart attack by way of a $2k bill.

    I seriously doubt they'll want to stay with AT&T after paying $2k.



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