Objective-C Losing Massive Popularity in Language Rankings



  • According to the latest Tiobe Programming Language Popularity Rankings, Apple's Objective-C language has fallen sharply from the third most popular language in the world just one year ago to fourteenth! That represents a fall from over ten percent of language interest to just over one percent, a loss of 90%.

    To some degree, the fall of Objective-C is not unsurprising as Apple, fifteen months ago, released its successor language, Swift. Swift has certainly taken over a lot of Objective-C's mindshare (both languages exist in current XCode.) Swift is, in many ways, the C# to Objective-C's VisualBASIC. But Swift and Objective-C combined make up only one third of the total language interest that Objective-C alone commanded one year ago (and Swift was already around and making in roads at that time too.)

    The belief is that OSX and iOS development has just dropped off that dramatically in the past year.



  • What's the believed reason for this drop off? Is it that the iDevice market is saturated world wide (mostly because of their price) and Android and other options hold the majority of the market, and are continuing to grow in emerging markets (very low end markets)?



  • Drop in development, probably because the initial rush to develop each and every app under the sun has stopped as well as people realizing that it is far easier to built HTML5 apps, which are universal.



  • HTML5 apps might be universal, but rarely do they seem to function as well (on small screens) as a dedicated app.



  • @Dashrender said:

    HTML5 apps might be universal, but rarely do they seem to function as well (on small screens) as a dedicated app.

    But is that because of who is making them, when they chose to make one or the other or just perception of when one is one and one is the other? Just because they often are not does not mean that they don't have the ability to be.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    @Dashrender said:

    HTML5 apps might be universal, but rarely do they seem to function as well (on small screens) as a dedicated app.

    But is that because of who is making them, when they chose to make one or the other or just perception of when one is one and one is the other? Just because they often are not does not mean that they don't have the ability to be.

    Your point has merit, I suppose with enough client side running script you could get to the same/similar effect. But even the likes of Facebook doesn't do this, the web interface on mobile just sucks compared to using the app.



  • @Dashrender said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @Dashrender said:

    HTML5 apps might be universal, but rarely do they seem to function as well (on small screens) as a dedicated app.

    But is that because of who is making them, when they chose to make one or the other or just perception of when one is one and one is the other? Just because they often are not does not mean that they don't have the ability to be.

    Your point has merit, I suppose with enough client side running script you could get to the same/similar effect. But even the likes of Facebook doesn't do this, the web interface on mobile just sucks compared to using the app.

    Sure, but are you comparing Objective-C to HTML 5? Or are you comparing an installed app to a web site? The two don't line up. You can have locally installed HTML 5 apps too. Do you know which are which? What I mean is... might you be using HTML 5 apps and think that they are Objective-C or Swift because they are installed rather than a web page? HTML 5 doesn't imply that it is coming from a web server.



  • And Ruby ended up being the language that entered the top ten to displace Objective-C.