Mozilla CEO quits......



  • Because of his opposition to gay marriage drew too much fire? If he was expressing his personal beliefs, does that automatically make them Mozilla's?

    http://news.yahoo.com/mozilla-says-ceo-resigns-amid-gay-marriage-controversy-195338477.html;_ylt=AwrBEiT.yT1TKDYAllnQtDMD



  • @Bill-Kindle said:

    Because of his opposition to gay marriage drew too much fire? If he was expressing his personal beliefs, does that automatically make them Mozilla's?

    http://news.yahoo.com/mozilla-says-ceo-resigns-amid-gay-marriage-controversy-195338477.html;_ylt=AwrBEiT.yT1TKDYAllnQtDMD

    If you are a CEO and express beliefs publicly, pretty much. Anyone with CEO in their goals knows this and does so at the risk of their jobs. He did this fully knowing what risks he was taking. CEOs get paid a lot to be the face of their businesses, if they ruin that, they ruin that.



  • Similar to celebrity spokespersons. When you have someone represent your business, you tie your corporate image to theirs. If they tarnish theirs, they tarnish the business. That's why celebrities get fired so often when they decide that their opinions are more important to them than their jobs. Which is fine, that is their right, but customers of a business have just as much right to vote with their wallets or "likes" about what kind of people they want getting a portion of their money.

    Mozilla's image was damaged by this guy. If you have customers, you have to take these things into account.



  • If you're a VP or C-Level, the line where you end and where the company begins really blurs. You become an extension of the company in a way. Sure, the pay's pretty sweet, but it comes with high non-monetary costs, like not having much of a life completely free from work.

    Edited for spelling



  • If it were Mozilla's money (stockholders money) being given to an organization such as the one he donated to then I could understand. However, what someone does in their personal life should not ruin them on the corporate side of things If they keep work / life separated. It just seems a little hypocritical to me that you can have someone get fired and shamed for opposing something but as long as you are supporting the 'right' side you are viewed as a righteous champion of a cause.



  • @Nara said:

    If you're a VP or C-Level, the line where you end and where the company beings really blurs. You become an extension of the company in a way. Sure, the pay's pretty sweet, but it comes with high non-monetary costs, like not having much of a life completely free from work.

    Exactly. There are tons of jobs where you can have your own opinions and they are just yours. Being famous or in the public eye or the representative for someone else you give up that freedom, at least to some degree.



  • @Bill-Kindle said:

    It just seems a little hypocritical to me that you can have someone get fired and shamed for opposing something but as long as you are supporting the 'right' side you are viewed as a righteous champion of a cause.

    I don't think it's a case of right or wrong. It's just a controversial cause. And when it's controversial you will get boycotts. And boycotts are bad for business, hence he goes. If Kim Jong-un created a really cool browser, I'd have a hard time using it.



  • @Carnival-Boy said:

    @Bill-Kindle said:

    It just seems a little hypocritical to me that you can have someone get fired and shamed for opposing something but as long as you are supporting the 'right' side you are viewed as a righteous champion of a cause.

    I don't think it's a case of right or wrong. It's just a controversial cause. And when it's controversial you will get boycotts. And boycotts are bad for business, hence he goes. If Kim Jong-un created a really cool browser, I'd have a hard time using it.

    I think if any temperamental five year old made a browser it would be hard to use.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    I think if any temperamental five year old made a browser it would be hard to use.

    I'll get my daughter to make one this weekend, and report back.



  • Good - I saw a good comment on reddit about it: Would there be this much controversy if he'd contributed to the KKK or something similar?



  • @Nic said:

    Good - I saw a good comment on reddit about it: Would there be this much controversy if he'd contributed to the KKK or something similar?

    Who know's. I'm just leery of selective outrage.



  • @Bill-Kindle said:

    @Nic said:

    Good - I saw a good comment on reddit about it: Would there be this much controversy if he'd contributed to the KKK or something similar?

    Who know's. I'm just leery of selective outrage.

    What outrage isn't selective?



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    @Bill-Kindle said:

    @Nic said:

    Good - I saw a good comment on reddit about it: Would there be this much controversy if he'd contributed to the KKK or something similar?

    Who know's. I'm just leery of selective outrage.

    What outrage isn't selective?

    I'm outraged at everything!



  • Fury is best served unbridled.



  • @Bill-Kindle
    No it does not make them Mozillas. Mozilla is a business, it does not have any religion. No matter what.



  • @scottalanmiller
    He wasn't CEO when he donated the money.



  • @Chad-K. said:

    @scottalanmiller
    He wasn't CEO when he donated the money.

    Does that matter? He chose to impact his career and the board opted to allow it to have happened.

    Just like things you say online or tattoos you are making a permanent decision when you do these things. Honestly it makes him an idiot and a bad candidate for CEO - it shows a horrible understanding of actions and consequences. Not a failing one wants in a leader.



  • @Seth-Cooper said:

    Fury is best served unbridled.

    True. Rage like a wild stallion.



  • @Bill-Kindle
    It's hypocritical to be against equality personally and work for an organization that promotes it. People will look at the situation and say "How long until he changes the organization in a way that pulls it away from where it is and toward those views that are in opposition to the companies history and stated ambitions". This isn't good for business.



  • @Nic said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @Bill-Kindle said:

    @Nic said:

    Good - I saw a good comment on reddit about it: Would there be this much controversy if he'd contributed to the KKK or something similar?

    Who know's. I'm just leery of selective outrage.

    What outrage isn't selective?

    I'm outraged at everything!

    outrage.jpg



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    @Chad-K. said:

    @scottalanmiller
    He wasn't CEO when he donated the money.

    Does that matter? He chose to impact his career and the board opted to allow it to have happened.

    Just like things you say online or tattoos you are making a permanent decision when you do these things. Honestly it makes him an idiot and a bad candidate for CEO - it shows a horrible understanding of actions and consequences. Not a failing one wants in a leader.
    Only in that he didn't do it as CEO



  • @Chad-K. said:

    @Bill-Kindle
    It's hypocritical to be against equality personally and work for an organization that promotes it. People will look at the situation and say "How long until he changes the organization in a way that pulls it away from where it is and toward those views that are in opposition to the companies history and stated ambitions". This isn't good for business.

    But at the same time doesn't it alienate the same people who may hold different beliefs? Isn't that the same thing? like role reversal?



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    @Chad-K. said:

    @scottalanmiller
    He wasn't CEO when he donated the money.

    Does that matter? He chose to impact his career and the board opted to allow it to have happened.

    Just like things you say online or tattoos you are making a permanent decision when you do these things. Honestly it makes him an idiot and a bad candidate for CEO - it shows a horrible understanding of actions and consequences. Not a failing one wants in a leader.

    So he does something long before he was a CEO. I've made some bad decisions life (who hasn't?) but does that make me an eternal idiot and unqualified to run a company?



  • If it is on this scale, which is pretty huge, yes, it would generally disqualify you from running a public company or being a spokesperson for one. People who intend to make CEO a career objective have to be planning for that their entire life. No different than running for office.



  • @Bill-Kindle said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @Chad-K. said:

    @scottalanmiller
    He wasn't CEO when he donated the money.

    Does that matter? He chose to impact his career and the board opted to allow it to have happened.

    Just like things you say online or tattoos you are making a permanent decision when you do these things. Honestly it makes him an idiot and a bad candidate for CEO - it shows a horrible understanding of actions and consequences. Not a failing one wants in a leader.

    So he does something long before he was a CEO. I've made some bad decisions life (who hasn't?) but does that make me an eternal idiot and unqualified to run a company?

    He could have survived if he'd apologized. But he gave a non-apology, which means he's still a homophobe.

    @Bill-Kindle said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    @Chad-K. said:

    @scottalanmiller
    He wasn't CEO when he donated the money.

    Does that matter? He chose to impact his career and the board opted to allow it to have happened.

    Just like things you say online or tattoos you are making a permanent decision when you do these things. Honestly it makes him an idiot and a bad candidate for CEO - it shows a horrible understanding of actions and consequences. Not a failing one wants in a leader.

    So he does something long before he was a CEO. I've made some bad decisions life (who hasn't?) but does that make me an eternal idiot and unqualified to run a company?



  • Remember, political contributions are public record. This is him doing something voluntary that has similarities to an arrest record. It was a massive, foolish professional risk. And for what purpose?

    This is someone who wanted to promote this agenda so strongly that he willingly risked his career over it. This isn't drinking too much on a weekend. This isn't a tattoo. This is truly a big deal both in his actions and his understanding of their ramifications to himself and his employer.



  • Yes. He had a way to fix this but didn't. He has his priorities and that's "fine". He is allowed to be that guy. And everyone else is allowed to be offended and upset with someone that employees him. He spoke with his wallet and his customers spoke with theirs.





  • @scottalanmiller said:

    Came across another perspective on the situation today:

    http://eyeonlinux.com/linux-commentary/did-brendan-eich-do-the-right-thing-by-stepping-down-as-mozillas-ceo/

    That's exactly how I feel. What we are seeing is tolerance through intolerance I believe.

    http://www.str.org/articles/the-intolerance-of-tolerance#.U0BKEPnIYlQ



  • @Bill-Kindle said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    Came across another perspective on the situation today:

    http://eyeonlinux.com/linux-commentary/did-brendan-eich-do-the-right-thing-by-stepping-down-as-mozillas-ceo/

    That's exactly how I feel. What we are seeing is tolerance through intolerance I believe.

    http://www.str.org/articles/the-intolerance-of-tolerance#.U0BKEPnIYlQ

    Maybe, but that's like saying that it's okay to be a bully, it's only bad if you try to protect the kid being beat up. I think that there is a big difference between actively respecting people and indifference. I understand the idea and there is no perfect answer. But I feel this is the ultimate in PC... it's okay for people to be evil or mean or bullies. You have to be neutral but no one else does. It's seems like an excuse to me. An excuse not to stand up, not to protect the weak, not to do the right thing.

    The bottom line is, complete tolerance is bad. Tolerating evil is bad. Tolerating bullying is bad.

    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing." (Edmund Burke)

    Tolerance itself is not a good or a bad thing, that's the modern mistake. Tolerance of good is good. Tolerance of bad is bad. Tolerance is neither good nor bad.


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