New Words That I Am Promoting



  • I love new words. I'm going to document them.



  • Localest - Being the most local, having the greatest locality, the closest or nearest to something.



  • Performant - possessing great performance.



  • Are these real, or did you make them up? ๐Ÿ˜‰



  • @Dashrender I think a little bit of both... I have definitely seen Performant before... never seen Localest though.

    Usage of both in a sentence:

    I moved my files to the localest server and it was most performant after I made that change!



  • I made up a new word that I'd like to share with you guys: plagiarism



  • @Dashrender said:

    Are these real, or did you make them up? ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Localest I made up in another thread.

    Performant is a "well known" new word that is not AFAIK in the dictionary yet but I use heavily and feel is a valuable term that should be used.



  • @Nic said:

    I made up a new word that I'd like to share with you guys: plagiarism

    I saw some Nic character on Facebook with that one last week.



  • @dafyre said:

    I moved my files to the localest server and it was most performant after I made that change!

    FTW



  • Already dictionaried words that many people avoid but I believe are very good and should be promoted in the common lexicon:

    moreso and its obvious partner lessso



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    Already dictionaried words that many people avoid but I believe are very good and should be promoted in the common lexicon:

    moreso and its obvious partner lessso

    Our Phones will go nuts with the autocorrects for those, lol.



  • I hate that phones are making people less literate. The number of words that we use must be dropping and the likelihood of creating new ones is probably dropping as well. It's nice to have some solidification but phones are so slow to adapt and use such a small lexicon sampling that many previously common or just really good and expressive words are now being avoided or routinely mangled.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    @Nic said:

    I made up a new word that I'd like to share with you guys: plagiarism

    I saw some Nic character on Facebook with that one last week.

    I stole it from him



  • @Nic said:

    I stole it from him

    You should come up with a new word that describes when something like that happens!



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    I hate that phones are making people less literate. The number of words that we use must be dropping and the likelihood of creating new ones is probably dropping as well. It's nice to have some solidification but phones are so slow to adapt and use such a small lexicon sampling that many previously common or just really good and expressive words are now being avoided or routinely mangled.

    Technology and the 'auto-correct' features are nice. But they prompted me to find pen and paper for certain things. And an interest in the old manual typewriter.
    underwood5[1].jpg
    I have one of these:

    Still works great, replaced the ribbon and types nearly as new.



  • I am pretty sure that I own a Smith Corona electric somewhere.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    I hate that phones are making people less literate.

    At least spelling is greatly improved and eubonic and other creative spellings are becoming less main stream



  • @MattSpeller said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    I hate that phones are making people less literate.

    At least spelling is greatly improved and eubonic and other creative spellings are becoming less main stream

    All that progress has been trumped by the fact that you can teach your phone to use incorrect spellings for auto correct. Most people wouldn't know a spelling error if you slapped them with it.



  • There, Their, and They're... Oh, my!
    You, Yours, You're... I think I'll go cry.



  • In case this one isn't in the dictionary it really needs to be attritioning. I use that one constantly.



  • @scottalanmiller May I have that word in a sentence? lol.



  • @dafyre said:

    @scottalanmiller May I have that word in a sentence? lol.

    I actually use it regularly.

    A common one is: The company is losing staff rapidly, they are attritioning out.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    @dafyre said:

    @scottalanmiller May I have that word in a sentence? lol.

    I actually use it regularly.

    A common one is: The company is losing staff rapidly, they are attritioning out.

    Just saw it in another thread, lol. Thanks for that. ๐Ÿ˜Ž



  • Ha ha, I thought that it was on here somewhere that I had said it ๐Ÿ™‚



  • I think that's one of those words that, when used properly, would be hyphenated. Attrition-ing. That's how one normally turns a noun into a verb-like word when it doesn't really exist in the common vernacular as a verb.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    Localest - Being the most local, having the greatest locality, the closest or nearest to something.

    That's just grammar bad.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    In case this one isn't in the dictionary it really needs to be attritioning. I use that one constantly.

    Moar grammar bad.
    It sounds more like attributing the way it's written.
    ย 
    Attrition is a process.
    We are winning the war by attrition
    NOT
    We are winning the war by attritioning the enemy
    ย 
    The addition of ing doesn't always make sense even though it sounds passable.



  • @nadnerB said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    Localest - Being the most local, having the greatest locality, the closest or nearest to something.

    That's just grammar bad.

    Is it? Making a most local is not really different from long having one for most close.



  • @nadnerB said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    In case this one isn't in the dictionary it really needs to be attritioning. I use that one constantly.

    Moar grammar bad.
    It sounds more like attributing the way it's written.
    ย 
    Attrition is a process.
    We are winning the war by attrition
    NOT
    We are winning the war by attritioning the enemy
    ย 
    The addition of ing doesn't always make sense even though it sounds passable.

    Attrioning is a common verb in business, though. The reason that your example sounds wrong is because it is used incorrectly, not because the word isn't useful. You can't make someone else attrition realistically so it sounds strange. Try it like this...

    We are losing the war due to the rate of our troops attritioning.

    Or...
    Our company is failing because our staff is attritioning too quickly.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    Attrioning is a common verb in business, though.
    The reason that your example sounds wrong is because it is used incorrectly, not because the word isn't useful.

    No. My example is correct use of the word.

    You can't make someone else attrition realistically so it sounds strange. Try it like this...

    We are losing the war due to the rate of our troops attritioning.

    Or...
    Our company is failing because our staff is attritioning too quickly.

    Hmmm, no. Attrition is a noun. ing CAN be used to turn nouns into adjectives but in this case, it doesn't make sense.

    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/attrition

    Attrition - noun

    1. a reduction or decrease in numbers, size, or strength:
      Our club has had a high rate of attrition because so many members have moved away.
    2. a wearing down or weakening of resistance, especially as a result of continuous pressure or harassment:
      The enemy surrounded the town and conducted a war of attrition.
    3. a gradual reduction in work force without firing of personnel, as when workers resign or retire and are not replaced.
    4. the act of rubbing against something; friction.
    5. a wearing down or away by friction; abrasion.
      Also, here: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/attrition

    ing
    Definition of -ING

    1: action or process <running> <sleeping> : instance of an action or process <a meeting>
    2a : product or result of an action or process <an engraving> โ€”often in plural <earnings>
    b : something used in an action or process <a bed covering> <the lining of a coat>
    3: action or process connected with (a specified thing) <boating>
    4: something connected with, consisting of, or used in making (a specified thing) <scaffolding> <shirting>
    5: something related to (a specified concept) <offing>

    Honestly, I don't think that the word has been understood by those business bods. If the word doesn't fit, restructure the sentence. Don't bolt on suffixes like accessories (That's something that a certain "cloud" provider would do to make their "service" sound like something).


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