Clocking in for some employees only?



  • We have an issue at one of our locations, where there are finger-print readers used to "Clock-in & out" even for lunch breaks.

    Yet this rule is only mandatory for ~30-40 employees out of 125+, whereas the majority just writes down on a list when they arrive/leave.

    I know for a fact that a good number of personnel (Whether those who are supposed to clock in or check in on the list) leave early without being penalized quite often.

    With the list, anyone can write their buddies name down so they don't even have to be in the building. With the finger-print reader that's obviously impossible.

    I feel like this is some form of discrimination, I'll admit when I'm late, but being in IT we also work more hours than any staff member in the building by 5-10 hours weekly!

    Does anyone else have to deal with something like this at their place of work?



  • Clocking in and out is so problematic. The number of times that I've forgotten to do one or the other at jobs where it was required... I haven't had to do this in years, though. Finger print scanners seem pretty extreme, especially when only a fraction of the people in the company are required to use them.



  • @Dominica said:

    Clocking in and out is so problematic. The number of times that I've forgotten to do one or the other at jobs where it was required... I haven't had to do this in years, though. Finger print scanners seem pretty extreme, especially when only a fraction of the people in the company are required to use them.

    I forgot to mention, they had issues with reading certain employee finger-prints therefore a FOB reader was attached to it...which defeats the purpose of a finger-print reader (ie "Hey Jimmy I'm going home, could you use my FOB to clock me out in 4 hours?").



  • @Dominica said:

    Clocking in and out is so problematic. The number of times that I've forgotten to do one or the other at jobs where it was required... I haven't had to do this in years, though. Finger print scanners seem pretty extreme, especially when only a fraction of the people in the company are required to use them.

    We used this in a mental healthcare facility. direct care staff had to use the hand clocks because they proved themselves untrustworthy to use PIN clocking, card clocking, or phone in clocking. Had to find a means that couldn't be cheated, cause they would cheat.



  • I was a lazy poster, I meant that fingerprint readers give the perception of being extreme and big-brother, especially when it seems that certain people are being singled out to use them, while others are not required to do so. We have been talking about getting a fingerprint scanner lock for the front door for years. It would be so much easier than giving people keys to your house, and is much more James Bond than a combo lock.



  • @Hubtech said:

    @Dominica said:

    Clocking in and out is so problematic. The number of times that I've forgotten to do one or the other at jobs where it was required... I haven't had to do this in years, though. Finger print scanners seem pretty extreme, especially when only a fraction of the people in the company are required to use them.

    We used this in a mental healthcare facility. direct care staff had to use the hand clocks because they proved themselves untrustworthy to use PIN clocking, card clocking, or phone in clocking. Had to find a means that couldn't be cheated, cause they would cheat.

    But if some full time salary employees are forced to do it, and some are not...I'd assume that would be a legal problem. We have people who received bonuses for "Working beyond their job title" leaving early consistently and I'm sitting here having to clock out to step out of the building for a few minutes. This is a public sector job, we are all employees of "The state".



  • LOL.. read @scottalanmiller recent post on Bonuses, I loved it.

    Yeah I agree with you, why are some required and some not? That seems completely arbitrary. If you have a public union for the shop (OMG did I just say that? - I personally HATE unions) it might be your only chance to make a real change to make things uniform.

    My friends shop installed stations with cameras. When you punched the clock it took your picture at the same time. No more punching in or out for your buddy. Since it was a PIN in or out it doesn't suffer any of the problems that biometrics readers have.



  • I have nothing like that and haven't since I was 21 or so (long ago.)

    Now it is all just based on honesty and that includes overtime, comp time or whatever. But I'm also salary and so have no set hours anyway.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    I have nothing like that and haven't since I was 21 or so (long ago.)

    Now it is all just based on honesty and that includes overtime, comp time or whatever. But I'm also salary and so have no set hours anyway.

    Agreed, I think I was 25 or so when i moved to salary and hope to never go back!



  • @Dashrender said:

    LOL.. read @scottalanmiller recent post on Bonuses, I loved it.

    Yeah I agree with you, why are some required and some not? That seems completely arbitrary. If you have a public union for the shop (OMG did I just say that? - I personally HATE unions) it might be your only chance to make a real change to make things uniform.

    My friends shop installed stations with cameras. When you punched the clock it took your picture at the same time. No more punching in or out for your buddy. Since it was a PIN in or out it doesn't suffer any of the problems that biometrics readers have.

    this requires someone to view each punch though. it's accomplishing the same thing, just much less efficient. Company i used to work for had 500 employees that used the punch clock, could you imagine having to review 3 shifts of 200+ folks daily? that'd be a full time job/terrible. the hand clocks we used couldn't be fooled. you couldn't even wear a new ring or it would throw everything off and give you a misread.



  • @Hubtech said:

    this requires someone to view each punch though. it's accomplishing the same thing, just much less efficient. Company i used to work for had 500 employees that used the punch clock, could you imagine having to review 3 shifts of 200+ folks daily? that'd be a full time job/terrible. the hand clocks we used couldn't be fooled. you couldn't even wear a new ring or it would throw everything off and give you a misread.

    Why would someone need to review it for everyone? Most companies only bother reviewing when there is a suspected problem. I suppose that the fingerprint option would possibly make it a non issue, but at the same time the cost of fingerprint machines for this type of application I would expect to be pretty expensive compared to a solution that takes pictures (cheep hardware and some drive space).

    My friend did have plenty of inhouse programming talent and the hardware so this was a relatively cheap option (OK the programmers time might possibly have costs more than just buying a solution - but you see where I'm going with this).



  • I know for us, it was well worth it. maybe 2500 for the hand clock. but like i said, with that many employees, if it stops 1/2 of them from misclocking shifts, it pays for itself.


Log in to reply