Non-IT News Thread



  • Isn't vaping like an oil that they burn? Like, that sounds like a horrible idea!


  • Banned

    @scottalanmiller said in Non-IT News Thread:

    Isn't vaping like an oil that they burn? Like, that sounds like a horrible idea!

    It's a chemical that gets turned into a gaseous vapor. (How do you get vapor - with a lot of heat).

    The content that is turned into vapor I'm unsure of, but I wouldn't want it in my body.



  • @DustinB3403 said in Non-IT News Thread:

    @scottalanmiller said in Non-IT News Thread:

    Isn't vaping like an oil that they burn? Like, that sounds like a horrible idea!

    It's a chemical that gets turned into a gaseous vapor. (How do you get vapor - with a lot of heat).

    The content that is turned into vapor I'm unsure of, but I wouldn't want it in my body.

    Especially once they add flavouring. Now it's whatever bad base material, plus whatever drug (if any) is added, plus the liquified fruit loops or whatever!



  • Loud sex mistaken for fight leads to gunshots at Days Inn Hotel

    Police responded for a fight inside a hotel room, then it turned out it was just two women having loud sex
    That’s what charging documents say happened Monday afternoon at the Days Inn Hotel in the 8700 block of Loch Raven Boulevard in Towson. It all started when two clerks working at the front desk of the hotel got a call from one of the rooms. During the call, the workers reportedly heard two people fighting in the background, prompting the on-duty security guard to call police. Arriving officers spoke with two women who were supposedly in the room when the commotion was heard. Each told police they were not fighting but were having sex. At the request of the security officer, police ordered the women to pack up and leave the hotel.



  • @mlnews how was that not in Florida?

    But OMG MD gets trashy, too.



  • The remains of a man missing for 22 years have been found — thanks to Google Earth

    For over two decades, William Moldt’s family was left with unanswered questions about his disappearance.
    Now they can have closure — all because of a startling discovery made while browsing Google Earth. Moldt, who was 40 at the time, seemingly vanished from Palm Beach County, Florida, on November 7, 1997. That evening, he called his girlfriend from a bar to tell her he would be home soon, according to CNN affiliate WPTV. Shortly afterward, he was seen leaving the bar, alone and getting in his vehicle. He reportedly did not appear intoxicated, according to WPTV. That night 22 years ago was the last time anyone would see him alive. A previous resident of a neighborhood in Wellington, Florida, was searching around on Google Earth when they noticed something in the water, according to the Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office. In the images from Google Earth, you can see what appears to be a car in a retention pond that is flanked by homes.


  • Banned

    @mlnews said in Non-IT News Thread:

    you can see what appears to be a car in a retention pond that is flanked by homes.

    And no one has noticed a car in this pond for 22 years?! It's not so far in the water that it isn't plainly visible..



  • @DustinB3403 said in Non-IT News Thread:

    And no one has noticed a car in this pond for 22 years?! It's not so far in the water that it isn't plainly visible..

    In the article it mentions the water "shifting" or something making the car appear now.



  • Screenshot from 2019-09-13 14-41-34.png

    Look at the angle... not surprisingly that would not be visible from the sidewalk there. It's barely visible from satellite. You have to look through a lot more water to see it from the oblique angle of a standing person.



  • BBC News - Magpie attack: Australian cyclist dies while fleeing swooping bird
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-australia-49711147



  • @scottalanmiller said in Non-IT News Thread:

    BBC News - Magpie attack: Australian cyclist dies while fleeing swooping bird
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-australia-49711147

    Magpies can be agro bastards. I had to rescue a small child from one having a go at him. Jumping/swooping, getting in his face.

    PSA via meme. (No disrespect to the poor bloke in the article)
    668f441d-10cd-420a-83bd-2fba5d477265-image.png





  • BBC News - Ric Ocasek, lead singer of The Cars, dies aged 75
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-49711161



  • Designs revealed for incredible new space hotel

    It's 50 years since man first stepped on the moon, and we're still harboring dreams of escaping life on Earth for the mysteries of space.
    If a career as an astronaut isn't for you, perhaps the promise of a sojourn in a space hotel might be appealing. Californian company The Gateway Foundation has released plans for the Von Braun Station, a cruise ship-style hotel floating among the stars. The aim is to get the hotel off the ground by 2025 and make it fully operational for travel by 2027. The Von Braun station is just one such space-based tourism option in development. Also planning to propel people into space are Virgin Galactic, Elon Musk's SpaceX company and Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin aerospace company, not to mention the International Space Station -- which recently announced the possibility of commercial collaborations.



  • @mlnews Read about that last week. Solid standard design that humans worked out ages ago.

    Problem is implementation.



  • Pokemon: 'Ash Ketchum failing for 22 years taught me being a loser is OK'

    We're told to never give up on our dreams - but grafting for 22 years? That might be pushing things for most of us.
    Not for Ash Ketchum though, who this weekend became a Pokemon Master in a new episode of the Pokemon anime. Yes, obviously Ash is a cartoon character and Pokemon aren't real, but for many fans of the franchise it's a big moment. He's been plugging away at being the very best ("like no one ever was") since 1997. In the latest episode, he won the Alola Pokemon league, despite the fact that throughout much of his adventures, he's been quite bad at training Pokemon - losing every other championship he's ever entered.



  • The title is pretty Clickbait, but the actual content of the article is well done. I am sure most people are going to just lock on oh my God a retweet is an endorsement in the Twitter verse is going to go to hell over it.

    https://mainichi.jp/english/articles/20190917/p2a/00m/0na/017000c



  • @JaredBusch That was an interesting article and it made some good points



  • Millions of Americans’ medical images and data are available on the Internet

    Anyone can take a peek.
    Medical images and health data belonging to millions of Americans, including X-rays, MRIs, and CT scans, are sitting unprotected on the Internet and available to anyone with basic computer expertise. The records cover more than 5 million patients in the United States and millions more around the world. In some cases, a snoop could use free software programs—or just a typical Web browser—to view the images and private data, an investigation by ProPublica and the German broadcaster Bayerischer Rundfunk found.



  • Bird populations in US and Canada down 3bn in 50 years

    Bird populations in Asia and the US are "in crisis", according to two major studies.
    The first concludes there are three billion fewer birds in the US and Canada today compared to 1970 - a loss of 29% of North America's birds. The second outlines a tipping point in "the Asian songbird crisis": on the island of Java, Indonesia, more birds may now live in cages than in the wild. Scientists hope the findings will serve as a wake-up call. The two studies are published in the journals Science and Biological Conservation.



  • @mlnews said in Non-IT News Thread:

    Bird populations in US and Canada down 3bn in 50 years

    Bird populations in Asia and the US are "in crisis", according to two major studies.
    The first concludes there are three billion fewer birds in the US and Canada today compared to 1970 - a loss of 29% of North America's birds. The second outlines a tipping point in "the Asian songbird crisis": on the island of Java, Indonesia, more birds may now live in cages than in the wild. Scientists hope the findings will serve as a wake-up call. The two studies are published in the journals Science and Biological Conservation.

    Wow - that's kinda scary...



  • @mlnews said in Non-IT News Thread:

    Bird populations in US and Canada down 3bn in 50 years

    Bird populations in Asia and the US are "in crisis", according to two major studies.
    The first concludes there are three billion fewer birds in the US and Canada today compared to 1970 - a loss of 29% of North America's birds. The second outlines a tipping point in "the Asian songbird crisis": on the island of Java, Indonesia, more birds may now live in cages than in the wild. Scientists hope the findings will serve as a wake-up call. The two studies are published in the journals Science and Biological Conservation.

    Heard about that on WSB this morning.



  • SLS: Nasa's giant 'Moon rocket' takes shape

    Nasa has finished assembling the main structural components for its largest rocket since the Apollo-era Saturn V.
    Engineers at the agency's Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF) in New Orleans connected the last of five sections that make up the core of the Space Launch System (SLS). The rocket will be used to send an uncrewed Orion craft to the Moon, in a flight expected to launch in 2021. This will pave the way for crewed missions, with a landing in 2024. The last piece of the SLS' 64m (212ft) -tall core stage was the complicated engine section. This will serve as the attachment point for the four powerful RS-25 engines, which are capable of producing two million pounds of thrust (9 meganewtons). The RS-25 engines, built by Sacramento, California-based Aerojet Rocketdyne, are the same ones that powered the now-retired space shuttle orbiter.



  • BBC News - Why Greeks question this role model's credentials
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-49753214



  • Climate change: Impacts 'accelerating' as leaders gather for UN talks

    The signs and impacts of global warming are speeding up, the latest science on climate change, published ahead of key UN talks in New York, says.
    The data, compiled by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), says the five-year period from 2014 to 2019 is the warmest on record. Sea-level rise has accelerated significantly over the same period, as CO2 emissions have hit new highs. The WMO says carbon-cutting efforts have to be intensified immediately. The climate statement is a pull-together of the latest science on the causes and growing impacts of unprecedented levels of warming seen in recent years. Recognising that global temperatures have risen by 1.1 degrees C since 1850, the paper notes they have gone up by 0.2C between 2011 and 2015.



  • @mlnews speaking of... central Transylvania which is traditionally a super mild climate, hit 32F on the last day of summer! Totally unheard of there.



  • Satellite will gain hi-res view of greenhouse effect

    Europe will launch a satellite to obtain a high-resolution view of Earth's greenhouse effect.
    The Forum mission will carry a spectrometer to sense the far-infrared radiation coming up off the Earth. It's in this long wavelength portion of the electromagnetic spectrum that water vapour and carbon dioxide absorb energy very efficiently, warming the planet in the process. Remarkably, it's not a region that has been mapped extensively before. This means scientists are missing a number of key features in their climate models, including the detailed workings of some of the feedbacks in the planet's atmosphere that amplify or mitigate warming. These omissions would include the behaviour of certain types of cloud.



  • Prehistoric babies fed animal milk in bottles

    Prehistoric babies were bottle-fed with animal milk more than 3,000 years ago, according to new evidence.
    Archaeologists found traces of animal fats inside ancient clay vessels, giving a rare insight into the diets of Bronze and Iron Age infants.The discovery suggests milk was given to infants to supplement breast feeding and could have contributed to a baby boom.The type of milk is unknown, but goats or cows are likely suspects.This is the first direct evidence for how prehistoric infants were fed, said Dr Julie Dunne of the University of Bristol, adding that the practice could have boosted fertility. "It's so nice to have that window on the past and think about how mothers and how families were dealing with bringing up children several thousand years ago," she told BBC News.



  • Giant planet around tiny star 'should not exist'

    Astronomers have discovered a giant planet that, they say, should not exist, according to current theories.
    The Jupiter-like world is unusually large compared with its host star, contradicting a widely held idea about the way planets form. The star, which lies 284 trillion km away, is an M-type red dwarf - the most common type in our galaxy. An international team of astronomers has reported its findings in the journal Science. "It's exciting because we've wondered for long a time whether giant planets like Jupiter and Saturn can form around such small stars," said Prof Peter Wheatley, from the University of Warwick, UK, who was not involved with the latest study. "I think the general impression had been that these planets just didn't exist, but we couldn't be sure because small stars are very faint, which makes them difficult to study, even though they are much more common than stars like the Sun," he told BBC News.



  • Elon Musk upbeat on Starship test flights

    The American entrepreneur Elon Musk has given a further update on his Starship and Super Heavy rocket system.
    He plans to use the new vehicles to send people to the Moon and Mars, and also to move them swiftly around the Earth. The SpaceX CEO is in the process of building prototypes and plans to start flying them in the coming months. The Mk1 version of his Starship would begin high-altitude tests in the next one to two months, he said. "This is the most inspiring thing I've ever seen," the entrepreneur told an audience gathered at the company's Boca Chica, Texas, facility where the prototype has been assembled. "So this thing is going to take off, fly to 65,000ft, about 20km, and come back and land. So that giant thing, it's really going be pretty epic to see that thing take off and come back."


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