What Is Your Favorite Linux for Server Use



  • Using Linux strictly as a server, no GUI or end users involved, where we are concerned about stability and maintainability, what would you choose?



  • For normal server use, I say CentOS / RHEL. It is the best known, best supported, most generic Linux distro available.

    For storage or clusters, I go with OpenSuse because they focus on those areas and do them really well.

    Once in a while, but only rarely, I'll use Ubuntu if supporting an app designed primarily for that platform.



  • All our web servers are CentOS. Been using it for quite some time and never thought of changing it. And seems like the user base/support forums available for centos/redhat is huge.



  • @ambarishrh said:

    All our web servers are CentOS. Been using it for quite some time and never thought of changing it. And seems like the user base/support forums available for centos/redhat is huge.

    That's because Red Hat is something like 90%+ of the US Linux server market. And we tend to be the big forum using region. And outside of the US, Red Hat is almost always in the top two (Suse being the key alternative.)



  • I have a box running CentOS 6.x here at home hosting my personal site just for tinkering. I chose CentOS because that is the OS I was already familiar with from using PBX in a Flash for years.



  • Elastix is built on CentOS too.



  • Speaking of Linux Server.. correct me if i am wrong can i use Linux as my server then my client computers are Windows?



  • I don't use Linux much on servers, but when I do, I use RHEL. Chances are that someone's already done with it what I'm trying to do, so the odds of obtaining assistance with it increase. If needed, I can even go direct to RH for tech support, and have a couple of times.



  • @Joyfano said:

    Speaking of Linux Server.. correct me if i am wrong can i use Linux as my server then my client computers are Windows?

    Yes. But it depends what you are serving. "Server" and "client" only mean "provides a service" and "consumes a service" so the terms are pretty loose. But to prove what you ask is true, you are currently reading this website on Windows (the client.) The site itself is running on Linux (the server.) So this interaction that we are having right now is both of us using Windows as the client and Linux as the service.

    Likewise you can use Office 365 on a Linux machine. So Windows is the server and Linux is the client in that case.


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