Resume Writing



  • A new job that I am interested in just popped on to the local market... Which means that it is time for me to update my resume. (I know I should be constantly doing this but...)

    So I have a few questions:

    1. What type of resume is preferred, a chronological resume, or a functional resume, or a combination of the two. Should I do a paragraph of responsibilities/accomplishments at a job or should I do bullet points? I've seen them both way and was wondering what was the easiest for HR departments to work with/read.
    2. How do I account for a degree that I haven't finished? Do I put it down? Or do I Ignore it and just let it go?
    3. Structure of the resume, what is preferred, at the moment I have a statement at the top, followed by some qualifications, and accomplishments, would it make sense to get rid of that and let my work/education experience speak for itself?

    I will probably have more... I haven't really updated the structure of my resume since college.



  • @coliver said:

    1. How do I account for a degree that I haven't finished? Do I put it down? Or do I Ignore it and just let it go?

    Fill out the degree as "anticpated."



  • I do work in chronological order, then sections for accomplishments, technologies, etc.



  • You only care that HR will not bin your CV. Primarily focus on what an IT hiring manager would want to see.



  • Agree with @scottalanmiller , list the degree as anticipated.

    Chronological order, putting skills, projects, and such first with your employment next. It's 'nice' to see your education, but your skill set is more important.



  • Chronological with accomplishments and technologies known is what I want to see. Education is very secondary and most IT people take forever to finish up their degrees so anticipated is fine.



  • How do you list accomplishments? Do you have an actual accomplishments section or is it just woven into your various jobs?



  • Woven into actual job descriptions.



  • Also, how do you list experience/skills/accomplishments that aren't tied to any specific job but were accomplished on your own? Like I set out on a personal project and did something pretty cool that is good experience for a resume, but not tied to any employer. How do I list that?



  • @Minion-Queen said:

    Woven into actual job descriptions.

    Ok.



  • What do people classify under accomplishments? I understand things like certifications would go under there. (Which I don't have unfortunately) What else? Significant infrastructure updates? Training's? Conferences attended?

    How about for technologies know? What do people generally put under that heading? Specifics like VMware or more general things like Hypervisors?

    So far I have the following:

    • Name
      • Contact information
    • Technologies
    • Work Experience (reverse chronological order)
    • Education
    • Personal Experience

    What is acceptable for personal experience? Would I put a home lab in there? Or would this be more like things done outside of school/work but still "work".



  • Personal Experience should be listed separately



  • What do people think about a work statement (or something similar) where you describe yourself and what you are looking for? I feel like they are kind of cheesy as the real reason to work is so that I can afford to live but I doubt anyone would want to see that.

    How about references do I include them or do a references available upon request?

    edit: obviously I will be proofreading this before I submit it.



  • Accomplishments could be Major Migrations and what you did for them don't forget to include project management skills.

    Specifics could be vague so that gives you space to explain a bit more. However detailed if you are looking to have the resume do all the talking for you.



  • If you have a home lab absolutely state that. But under personal accomplishments.



  • @Minion-Queen said:

    If you have a home lab absolutely state that. But under personal accomplishments.

    Good to have a home lab - shows willingness to learn.

    Bad thing about a home lab - you take work home with you. Oh wait - I do that already...



  • @g.jacobse said:

    @Minion-Queen said:

    If you have a home lab absolutely state that. But under personal accomplishments.

    Good to have a home lab - shows willingness to learn.

    Bad thing about a home lab - you take work home with you. Oh wait - I do that already...

    Well, I generally do things that I don't do at work in my lab. Technologies that I really want to learn but don't have a place for at work, or that I can't think of a use case without actually using it first.



  • @coliver said:

    What do people classify under accomplishments? I understand things like certifications would go under there. (Which I don't have unfortunately) What else? Significant infrastructure updates? Training's? Conferences attended?

    How about for technologies know? What do people generally put under that heading? Specifics like VMware or more general things like Hypervisors?

    So far I have the following:

    • Name
      • Contact information
    • Technologies
    • Work Experience (reverse chronological order)
    • Education
    • Personal Experience

    What is acceptable for personal experience? Would I put a home lab in there? Or would this be more like things done outside of school/work but still "work".

    Yes and no..

    Something are 'fluff' when you are talking IT. Server 2003 Admin doesn't need to be listed for every job you do if the last 3 places have had a Windows 2003 server you worked on. List it once.

    Same goes with some technologies. An adding machine (poor example) is a adding machine regardless of it being used in 5 jobs. It's a skill like riding a bike (sorta). I can ride a bike,.. Mountain, touring, cross - it's still a bike.

    Also I don't think Employer Contact information is needed on a resume. Again, adds fluff. The resume is your sales tool while riding with the guy on an elevator to the 4th floor. To much extra information and they will miss the important things they are looking for.



  • @Minion-Queen said:

    If you have a home lab absolutely state that. But under personal accomplishments.

    So you should have a personal accomplishments section, similar to how you have work experience and education sections?



  • @g.jacobse said:

    @coliver said:

    What do people classify under accomplishments? I understand things like certifications would go under there. (Which I don't have unfortunately) What else? Significant infrastructure updates? Training's? Conferences attended?

    How about for technologies know? What do people generally put under that heading? Specifics like VMware or more general things like Hypervisors?

    So far I have the following:

    • Name
      • Contact information
    • Technologies
    • Work Experience (reverse chronological order)
    • Education
    • Personal Experience

    What is acceptable for personal experience? Would I put a home lab in there? Or would this be more like things done outside of school/work but still "work".

    Yes and no..

    Something are 'fluff' when you are talking IT. Server 2003 Admin doesn't need to be listed for every job you do if the last 3 places have had a Windows 2003 server you worked on. List it once.

    Same goes with some technologies. An adding machine (poor example) is a adding machine regardless of it being used in 5 jobs. It's a skill like riding a bike (sorta). I can ride a bike,.. Mountain, touring, cross - it's still a bike.

    Also I don't think Employer Contact information is needed on a resume. Again, adds fluff. The resume is your sales tool while riding with the guy on an elevator to the 4th floor. To much extra information and they will miss the important things they are looking for.

    My resume starts with my contact info and then a categorized list of technologies I know or have worked with to some degree. It's great for triggering key word searches from recruiters, etc.



  • Thank you everyone for the help. Would anyone be willing to look it over and critique when I'm done?

    How do you list known technologies? Do you just use the bulletpoint buzzword mashup style? Or should I go into detail about how I know each technology? I assume the former since I will be going into some detail with my work experience section. Or do I forget about a dedicated technologies section and include them in the work experience section

    (also I can't spell experience for the life of me.)



  • @coliver said:

    Thank you everyone for the help. Would anyone be willing to look it over and critique when I'm done?

    How do you list known technologies? Do you just use the bulletpoint buzzword mashup style? Or should I go into detail about how I know each technology? I assume the former since I will be going into some detail with my work experience section. Or do I forget about a dedicated technologies section and include them in the work experience section

    (also I can't spell experience for the life of me.)

    I'll show you what I use. It's worked well for me. I modeled my resume after one I got from @PSX_Defector .



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  • That is right at the top of my resume, right before work experience, where I start with my most recent/current job, and work backwards.



  • @thanksaj said:

    So you should have a personal accomplishments section, similar to how you have work experience and education sections?

    Yes. Exactly.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    @thanksaj said:

    So you should have a personal accomplishments section, similar to how you have work experience and education sections?

    Yes. Exactly.

    When @Katie looked at my resume, I had an accomplishments section for just that purpose, and she said to take it out. I had things I done in my lab and accomplished things personally that I had there but she said drop that section...so now I'm confused.



  • From the hiring side of these things, I want to see that you are making an effort to learn and trying to grow on your own time. Not being limited by your work environment.



  • One more question. How do you deal with nondescript titles in an organization? For instance my title is Director of Information Technology.... What I actually do is helpdesk, Systems administration, implementation, and design. In fact anything and everything that plugs into the wall is generally considered IT. Would a System and Helpdesk Administrator title work better for this? Or should I just keep the official one?



  • That is the reason for listing your job accomplishments and day to day responsibilities. Titles mean nothing.



  • @Minion-Queen said:

    That is the reason for listing your job accomplishments and day to day responsibilities. Titles mean nothing.

    Yeah, there is no title standardization in the industry.


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