SAMIT: IBM Is Killing Off CentOS



  • @pattonb said in SAMIT: IBM Is Killing Off CentOS:

    I do like Debian, as for most of my deployments

    Debian leans more towards bleeding edge than any Linux OS that I know. That's why it is used as the base for other, more conservative releases, like Ubuntu. Debian isn't bleeding edge, in any way, but it is moreso than Ubuntu for sure as Ubuntu waits for things to stabilize on Debian before integrating into Ubuntu.

    Debian is a great choice, though, but would satisfy nothing you would have been needing CentOS for in the past.



  • If you want something akin to CentOS (free, LTS, vendor backed) then you have two choices: Ubuntu LTS and OpenSuse Leaf. That's it, the only two options that roughly align with CentOS.



  • @pattonb said in SAMIT: IBM Is Killing Off CentOS:

    yes, I am aware of Zimbra's announcement going forward

    I assume that you mean this one: "Zimbra will continue to evaluate other Linux distributions that are binary compatible with RHEL, and we will validate one to take the place of CentOS in 2H 2021. We also commit to support Ubuntu 20 in 1H 2021 (adding to our support of Ubuntu 16 and 18)."



  • @scottalanmiller no, the end of the open source, specifically the GUI (web mail) for users.

    thanks for your comments, now I have to go and re-arrange my prejudices 😉



  • @pattonb said in SAMIT: IBM Is Killing Off CentOS:

    no, the end of the open source, specifically the GUI (web mail) for users.

    Oh, that's a big deal. The GUI is really all that it is.

    I'd look at MailCow!



  • @scottalanmiller said in SAMIT: IBM Is Killing Off CentOS:

    @pattonb said in SAMIT: IBM Is Killing Off CentOS:

    I do like Debian, as for most of my deployments

    Debian leans more towards bleeding edge than any Linux OS that I know. That's why it is used as the base for other, more conservative releases, like Ubuntu. Debian isn't bleeding edge, in any way, but it is moreso than Ubuntu for sure as Ubuntu waits for things to stabilize on Debian before integrating into Ubuntu.

    Debian is a great choice, though, but would satisfy nothing you would have been needing CentOS for in the past.

    That's a bit of an odd statement Scott.

    Debian has a three releases in the works at all times.
    From upstream to downstream it's:
    Unstable -> Testing -> Stable

    • Unstable is where all new development happens and all new packages are.
    • Testing is a rolling release and what Ubuntu uses as their primary upstream.
    • Stable is the production release.

    So Debian is always bleeding edge, very stable and in between at all times - depending on what release you use.

    Debian stable undergoes a longer phase of testing and debugging before being released - compared to Ubuntu. So Debian stable certainly is the most conservative of the two and arguably the more stable one.

    Debian stable don't have fixed release cycle but it's usually somewhere between two to three years for each major release. Right now it's Debian 10 and the Debian project has been going for 27 years.

    Debian and Ubuntu has a symbiotic relationship. Debian has a larger scope and offers things that Ubuntu does not but Ubuntu is more specialized and as such offers things that Debian does not.



  • @Pete-S said in SAMIT: IBM Is Killing Off CentOS:

    That's a bit of an odd statement Scott.
    Debian has a three releases in the works at all times.
    From upstream to downstream it's:
    Unstable -> Testing -> Stable

    Unstable is where all new development happens and all new packages are.
    Testing is a rolling release and what Ubuntu uses as their primary upstream.
    Stable is the production release.

    So Debian is always bleeding edge, very stable and in between at all times - depending on what release you use.

    Not odd whatsoever. I said that Debian leans more towards bleeding edge than Ubuntu, not that it was bleeding edge. And what I said is completely true. Ubuntu starts from Debian stable (the least bleeding edge edition of Debian) and adds additional testing and support - making it even farther from the bleeding edge that the least bleeding edge edition of Debian.

    None of that is bad for Debian. Remember I also said that bleeding edge isn't the bad thing that people assume. That Ubuntu is so conservative is really a negative. Not a big negative, but a negative.



  • @scottalanmiller said in SAMIT: IBM Is Killing Off CentOS:

    Ubuntu starts from Debian stable

    No, that's not true. Ubuntu start from Debian testing (and unstable to some degree).

    You can clearly see it in the kernel version. Debian 10 (stable) is on 4.19 branch and Ubuntu 20.04 LTS is on 5.4 and Ubuntu 20.10 is on 5.8 I believe.



  • @Pete-S said in SAMIT: IBM Is Killing Off CentOS:

    @scottalanmiller said in SAMIT: IBM Is Killing Off CentOS:

    Ubuntu starts from Debian stable

    No, that's not true. Ubuntu start from Debian testing (and unstable to some degree).

    You can clearly see it in the kernel version. Debian 10 (stable) is on 4.19 branch and Ubuntu 20.04 LTS is on 5.4 and Ubuntu 20.10 is on 5.8 I believe.

    I only researched so much, but what I found was that releases were based on stable. I thought kernels on Ubuntu were like CentOS to Oracle where Oracle locks to the RHEL/CentOS release, but then offers a massively more current kernel for performance and stability reasons.



  • @Pete-S said in SAMIT: IBM Is Killing Off CentOS:

    @scottalanmiller said in SAMIT: IBM Is Killing Off CentOS:

    Ubuntu starts from Debian stable

    No, that's not true. Ubuntu start from Debian testing (and unstable to some degree).

    You can clearly see it in the kernel version. Debian 10 (stable) is on 4.19 branch and Ubuntu 20.04 LTS is on 5.4 and Ubuntu 20.10 is on 5.8 I believe.

    Newly installed Debian 10.8 system I setup on Friday.

    [email protected] ~]$ ssh daerma-eq
    Linux eq 4.19.0-14-amd64 #1 SMP Debian 4.19.171-2 (2021-01-30) x86_64
    


  • @scottalanmiller said in SAMIT: IBM Is Killing Off CentOS:

    @Pete-S said in SAMIT: IBM Is Killing Off CentOS:

    @scottalanmiller said in SAMIT: IBM Is Killing Off CentOS:

    Ubuntu starts from Debian stable

    No, that's not true. Ubuntu start from Debian testing (and unstable to some degree).

    You can clearly see it in the kernel version. Debian 10 (stable) is on 4.19 branch and Ubuntu 20.04 LTS is on 5.4 and Ubuntu 20.10 is on 5.8 I believe.

    I only researched so much, but what I found was that releases were based on stable. I thought kernels on Ubuntu were like CentOS to Oracle where Oracle locks to the RHEL/CentOS release, but then offers a massively more current kernel for performance and stability reasons.

    I understand. No Ubuntu has newer packages all over and is not based on Debian stable.
    It's based on unstable and testing. I don't know enough about Ubuntu so I can't say how much from each or what process they use.

    What you normally do on Debian if you need a newer kernel is to just run stable and install a newer kernel from the Debian Backports repository. There you have a selection of newer packages that has been backported to stable.

    But Debian stable never becomes as old as RHEL/CentOS so the need for newer kernels on servers is not prevalent.



  • @Pete-S said in SAMIT: IBM Is Killing Off CentOS:

    What you normally do on Debian if you need a newer kernel is to just run stable and install a newer kernel from the Debian Backports repository. There you have a selection of newer packages that has been backported to stable.

    Yeah, I had to do that just last week 🙂



  • @Pete-S said in SAMIT: IBM Is Killing Off CentOS:

    But Debian stable never becomes as old as RHEL/CentOS so the need for newer kernels on servers is not prevalent.

    Yeah, RHEL gets so ridiculously out of date.



  • @JaredBusch said in SAMIT: IBM Is Killing Off CentOS:

    @Pete-S said in SAMIT: IBM Is Killing Off CentOS:

    @scottalanmiller said in SAMIT: IBM Is Killing Off CentOS:

    Ubuntu starts from Debian stable

    No, that's not true. Ubuntu start from Debian testing (and unstable to some degree).

    You can clearly see it in the kernel version. Debian 10 (stable) is on 4.19 branch and Ubuntu 20.04 LTS is on 5.4 and Ubuntu 20.10 is on 5.8 I believe.

    Newly installed Debian 10.8 system I setup on Friday.

    [email protected] ~]$ ssh daerma-eq
    Linux eq 4.19.0-14-amd64 #1 SMP Debian 4.19.171-2 (2021-01-30) x86_64
    

    Yes, Debian stable normally uses the LTS release of the linux kernel.
    So 4.19 was the last LTS release of 4.x
    Then you had 5.4 and 5.10 is now the latest LTS release.

    So Debian 11 will almost certainly use the 5.10 kernel. Debian 11 has no official release date but it expected to be somewhere around summer time this year.



  • I believe Ubuntu just announced that 5.10 was coming in 21.04 as well.