Videowall system



  • We want to upgrade one of our research labs with a video wall featuring six large displays (4x 65" and 2x ~70") where we want to show data from approx. 8 to 16 sources, depending on the running scenario. Sending devices are scattered all around the building.

    Think of it like a news room. Displays will look like this on the wall:

    18fd10ef-b664-4d3d-80db-61b9915708da-image.png

    Most "grown up" systems are using all physical displays to create a single virtual screen where you can create your own grid and map sources to it. That's exactly what we want.

    I've already taken a closer look to the following two systems:

    We got a very fast UBNT based LAN (ES-48 on the access layer with 10G uplinks, three ES-16-XG as "backbone") there, so an Ethernet based solution will be fine.

    Requirements:

    • 4k screens
    • No lag (-> frame syncing)
    • capable of ~30fps
    • No extra cabling prefered -> Ethernet based

    Senders could be:

    • PCs and Servers (HDMI, DVI, DisplayPort, VGA)
    • Maybe Webcams (RTSP or something like that?)
    • Custom streams (for example, a group of research scientists and students on an airport during a flight test)

    Other ideas? Opinions? Any experience with the systems mentioned above?



  • @thwr If you can afford it, Christie stuff is solid but its probably very expensive. I'm not familiar with the other company though.



  • @jmoore said in Videowall system:

    @thwr If you can afford it, Christie stuff is solid but its probably very expensive. I'm not familiar with the other company though.

    My guess is a 5 digit price tag 🙂
    But you nailed it, we want something rock solid.



  • We have a Leyard Planar (WallDirector) video wall which is 4x4 (so 16 screens).

    It can support a bunch of different loadouts and up to 16 individual HDMI inputs. Each quadrant can go up to 4K (full 4x4 supports up to 10K).

    Might be worth a look.



  • @DustinB3403 said in Videowall system:

    We have a Leyard Planar (WallDirector) video wall which is 4x4 (so 16 screens).

    It can support a bunch of different loadouts and up to 16 individual HDMI inputs. Each quadrant can go up to 4K (full 4x4 supports up to 10K).

    Might be worth a look.

    Teracue is a Leyard company, AFAIK. Thanks for the hint.



  • @thwr We build custom video walls all day long. We do all of our own work within the RTI and Vanco ecosystems. All items below can be expanded for (nearly)
    unlimited sources and destinations. We regularly send IP Video across MPLS, VPN, WAN, 4GLTE, etc.... without any issues at all. We add Rokus, Cable STB, AppleTV, etc as the end user chooses. Screens can be made into a virtual single screens and each display can be segmented into as many screens as you want. Your imagination is really the only limit. We just finished a business development center for an auto dealership group. 51 inputs and 75 outputs including four 3x3 (9 screens), four 2x2 (4 screens) video walls plus a ton of 75" singles.

    Controller: https://www.rticorp.com/xp-8v-control-processor.html

    IP Video Decoders: https://www.vanco1.com/product/evo-ip-receiver/

    IP Video Encoders: https://www.vanco1.com/product/evo-ip-transmitter/

    Video Wall Control: https://www.vanco1.com/product/evo-ip-control-box/

    Plus whatever else you want/need.

    The RTI software that creates the apps allow you to make the sexiest apps you can imagine for Ipads, Iphones, Android devices, Windows, Mac, Linux, etc....

    Good luck! Video walls are so much fun!!!!!!



  • You can consider digital signage displays and digital signage media players. I am using brightsign players on regular TVs. But they make displays specifically for what you are trying to accomplish.



  • @wrx7m Brightsign is cheap, it can work in a pinch but it doesn't really work for a lot of the scenarios you might imagine.

    I have one sitting on a shelf that a vendor gave us to placate us because our wall wasn't working as promised.



  • @DustinB3403 That is a bummer. My main issue is the inability to provide credentials for sites that require a login.



  • @wrx7m It's just a SBC with HDMI out that allows you to use software to setup your scene. It'll take a few different files (but they need to be stored locally or on an SD card) for the unit.

    It's purely a LAN based device. It can work, but you really need to understand where it's limit is.



  • @DustinB3403 said in Videowall system:

    @wrx7m It's just a SBC with HDMI out that allows you to use software to setup your scene. It'll take a few different files (but they need to be stored locally or on an SD card) for the unit.

    It's purely a LAN based device. It can work, but you really need to understand where it's limit is.

    They have their cloud service that replaces the local software. Also, it is designed for more than just LAN. At least, since the middle of last year, when I got one.