Live boot



  • LIVE BOOT

    A live distro is made to boot read-only from USB stick (or CD/DVD) without installing anything. It's perfect for doing disk operations because the regular hard drives in the system doesn't have to be mounted to boot up the system.

    One of the first linux distros made especially for live booting was Knoppix. However today many distros have integrated live booting on the regular OS installation iso. Usually it says something like "Try Ubuntu" or "Try Fedora".

    This is how you do it with Ubuntu: https://tutorials.ubuntu.com/tutorial/try-ubuntu-before-you-install

    The linux kernel has excellent support for different chipsets and storage drivers so after doing a live boot, it's very likely that all drives will show up immediately.

    Then you can use partitioning tools and run shell commands to wipe or inspect whatever you want to do with the computers hard drives.

    It's also good because if the drives shows up (or whatever hardware you are troubleshooting) you know it's working.

    Sometimes when installing a new OS, the installer can get confused by unknown partitions or raid signatures, so booting linux on an usb drive and then wiping the system drives is a good way to make sure the installer starts with fresh drives.

    Live booting is also a good way to see if your hardware is supported by the linux distro you want to run.



  • Ah Knoppix, have not heard that name in a while.



  • I'm not sure how many more/less configurations the Linux kernel is aware of vs the Windows kernel in Win 10, but I'm guessing there are still cases where you will need to provide a driver after booting so the system can see a drive - as was the case in another recent thread (Win 10 can't find HDD - Workstation class machine Z440 has RAID controller Win10 does haven drivers for by default).



  • @Pete-S was someone asking about a live boot scenario and an explanation was required.

    I'm so confused by this topic's existence. . .



  • @DustinB3403 said in Live boot:

    @Pete-S was someone asking about a live boot scenario and an explanation was required.

    I'm so confused by this topic's existence. . .

    No he wasn't. he was helping someone else.

    This thread is a perfectly linkable definition thread.



  • @Dashrender said in Live boot:

    I'm not sure how many more/less configurations the Linux kernel is aware of vs the Windows kernel in Win 10, but I'm guessing there are still cases where you will need to provide a driver after booting so the system can see a drive - as was the case in another recent thread (Win 10 can't find HDD - Workstation class machine Z440 has RAID controller Win10 does haven drivers for by default).

    WTF are you talking about? None of that matters to this.

    The point of a "Live boot" means that it does not need to talk to any other data storage to boot.

    Yes what you said matters to an install. But that has nothing to do with this post.



  • @JaredBusch said in Live boot:

    @Dashrender said in Live boot:

    I'm not sure how many more/less configurations the Linux kernel is aware of vs the Windows kernel in Win 10, but I'm guessing there are still cases where you will need to provide a driver after booting so the system can see a drive - as was the case in another recent thread (Win 10 can't find HDD - Workstation class machine Z440 has RAID controller Win10 does haven drivers for by default).

    WTF are you talking about? None of that matters to this.

    The point of a "Live boot" means that it does not need to talk to any other data storage to boot.

    Yes what you said matters to an install. But that has nothing to do with this post.

    The OP specifically talks about using a Live disk to see and wipe local drives/partitions etc...



  • @Dashrender said in Live boot:

    @JaredBusch said in Live boot:

    @Dashrender said in Live boot:

    I'm not sure how many more/less configurations the Linux kernel is aware of vs the Windows kernel in Win 10, but I'm guessing there are still cases where you will need to provide a driver after booting so the system can see a drive - as was the case in another recent thread (Win 10 can't find HDD - Workstation class machine Z440 has RAID controller Win10 does haven drivers for by default).

    WTF are you talking about? None of that matters to this.

    The point of a "Live boot" means that it does not need to talk to any other data storage to boot.

    Yes what you said matters to an install. But that has nothing to do with this post.

    The OP specifically talks about using a Live disk to see and wipe local drives/partitions etc...

    But that has nothing to do with the linux kernel seeing more or less than windows does.

    It is about getting a booted working state so you can then do things.



  • @JaredBusch said in Live boot:

    No he wasn't. he was helping someone else.

    Your response is both confirmation and denial to my question.

    I get that it's a definition about what live booting is. I was asking why was he posting it. You stated "No he wasn't" (wasn't what, helping someone?) and then said he was helping someone.


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