Any Camera People Here?



  • I'm looking for a camera and I know nothing.

    I'm happy with the quality of the photos I get out of my Samsung Galaxy S6+ but I'd like to have, is it called a viewfinder? The thing you used to have to jam your eye up against with all the cameras we used to use before we used smartphones.

    Also something with bluetooth, a screen so I can review what I just shot, maybe wifi, SD card. Also the ability to add filters, just like I do on my smartphone.

    Manual focus and the ability to add lenses may be good as well.

    Budget is up to $500.

    With thanks.



  • @MarigabyFrias and I both are.



  • Do you want something large, like a traditional SLR? Or something tiny and compact? All about the pics, or do you want weather resistant or something like that? What's the use case? Interchangeable lenses adds a LOT of fragility and complexity.



  • Sizewise, I'm not really fussed.

    I'm not a big photographer, but do enjoy taking good pictures. I find I can't see the object of my photos well enough with a smartphone plus I find the size of the smartphone fumbly.

    I guess a good size would be something that can be carried easily. It has to be something that can be used by people that know nothing about cameras, just in the same way most people use the camera in their smartphone.



  • When I did A/V consulting a long time Canon and Sony were the best options. They had real high end cameras and others that were really good value. Not sure if that still holds true but maybe a place to start for you. For good prices try B&H Professional.



  • @jmoore said in Any Camera People Here?:

    When I did A/V consulting a long time Canon and Sony were the best options. They had real high end cameras and others that were really good value. Not sure if that still holds true but maybe a place to start for you. For good prices try B&H Professional.

    Nikon man here. Nikon and Lumix are what I use.



  • I had a Sony Alpha 100 DSLR for a long time. Picked it up at the CompUSA going out of business sale for 50% off retail. Today, I'd go with a mirrorless model, but the types I like are not normally easy for anyone to pick up and snap a photo. Sounds like you really just want a decent quality point-n-shoot.

    https://www.sony.com/electronics/cyber-shot-compact-cameras/dsc-hx90v That Sony is the type of thing I'd look at. Not a recommendation, just an example of the type of thing you're looking for.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Any Camera People Here?:

    @jmoore said in Any Camera People Here?:

    When I did A/V consulting a long time Canon and Sony were the best options. They had real high end cameras and others that were really good value. Not sure if that still holds true but maybe a place to start for you. For good prices try B&H Professional.

    Nikon man here. Nikon and Lumix are what I use.

    For any sort of even hobby level stuff, the real investment is lenses, not camera bodies.



  • @travisdh1 said in Any Camera People Here?:

    @scottalanmiller said in Any Camera People Here?:

    @jmoore said in Any Camera People Here?:

    When I did A/V consulting a long time Canon and Sony were the best options. They had real high end cameras and others that were really good value. Not sure if that still holds true but maybe a place to start for you. For good prices try B&H Professional.

    Nikon man here. Nikon and Lumix are what I use.

    For any sort of even hobby level stuff, the real investment is lenses, not camera bodies.

    Yup, and I only use real Nikkor.



  • what about the canon eos 400D??

    It looks like the only cameras with viewfinders in my price range are are DSLR cameras. Are they harder to use??



  • @siringo said in Any Camera People Here?:

    what about the canon eos 400D??

    It looks like the only cameras with viewfinders in my price range are are DSLR cameras. Are they harder to use??

    They normally have an automatic mode, but also don't do so well as the point-n-shoot cameras in that automatic mode. They're more for people who know what they want to use to get that perfect shot.



  • anyone have any first hand experience with the Nikon 3400 and/or 3500 DSLRs?



  • My wife was, and had a Sony Alpha a6000. It was mirrorless, and I think was the best camera for the price, a professional camera. The next step up gets well into the thousands of dollars. Lots of different lens options too. Lots of research went into it and that was the winner.



  • It comes down to specifically what you require... here's a pretty detailed comparison.

    https://www.apotelyt.com/compare-camera/nikon-d3500-vs-sony-a6000

    I'm not the camera person, so unfortunately I don't know what all factors went into the decision. But I know she was 100% happy with it.



  • @Obsolesce said in Any Camera People Here?:

    It comes down to specifically what you require... here's a pretty detailed comparison.

    https://www.apotelyt.com/compare-camera/nikon-d3500-vs-sony-a6000

    I'm not the camera person, so unfortunately I don't know what all factors went into the decision. But I know she was 100% happy with it.

    Thanks @Obsolesce for the info and link, much appreciated. I'm starting to lean towards the Nikon D3500, if for no other reason than it can take alot of photos before it needs a recharge. This is useful as I go away into the bush alot away from mains power.

    But this is a huge market, so I won't be surprised if I change my mind.



  • @siringo said in Any Camera People Here?:

    @Obsolesce said in Any Camera People Here?:

    It comes down to specifically what you require... here's a pretty detailed comparison.

    https://www.apotelyt.com/compare-camera/nikon-d3500-vs-sony-a6000

    I'm not the camera person, so unfortunately I don't know what all factors went into the decision. But I know she was 100% happy with it.

    Thanks @Obsolesce for the info and link, much appreciated. I'm starting to lean towards the Nikon D3500, if for no other reason than it can take alot of photos before it needs a recharge. This is useful as I go away into the bush alot away from mains power.

    But this is a huge market, so I won't be surprised if I change my mind.

    Yeah I don't know about the pictures thing because my wife took thousands of pictures before needing to charge it. I'm not sure why it is so low.

    For example, we got it before our Grand Canyon trip, and we took so many thousands of mostly pictures and some videos during the day before having to charge it at night. That number doesn't make any sense to me.

    EDIT: She had multiple batteries (just asked her) and she thought it was worth it being mirrorless vs a DSLR camera.



  • @Obsolesce said in Any Camera People Here?:

    @siringo said in Any Camera People Here?:

    @Obsolesce said in Any Camera People Here?:

    It comes down to specifically what you require... here's a pretty detailed comparison.

    https://www.apotelyt.com/compare-camera/nikon-d3500-vs-sony-a6000

    I'm not the camera person, so unfortunately I don't know what all factors went into the decision. But I know she was 100% happy with it.

    Thanks @Obsolesce for the info and link, much appreciated. I'm starting to lean towards the Nikon D3500, if for no other reason than it can take alot of photos before it needs a recharge. This is useful as I go away into the bush alot away from mains power.

    But this is a huge market, so I won't be surprised if I change my mind.

    Yeah I don't know about the pictures thing because my wife took thousands of pictures before needing to charge it. I'm not sure why it is so low.

    For example, we got it before our Grand Canyon trip, and we took so many thousands of mostly pictures and some videos during the day before having to charge it at night. That number doesn't make any sense to me.

    EDIT: She had multiple batteries (just asked her) and she thought it was worth it being mirrorless vs a DSLR camera.

    Oh yep. That's my next thing to read up on. What's all this 'mirrorless' stuff about?



  • @siringo said in Any Camera People Here?:

    @Obsolesce said in Any Camera People Here?:

    @siringo said in Any Camera People Here?:

    @Obsolesce said in Any Camera People Here?:

    It comes down to specifically what you require... here's a pretty detailed comparison.

    https://www.apotelyt.com/compare-camera/nikon-d3500-vs-sony-a6000

    I'm not the camera person, so unfortunately I don't know what all factors went into the decision. But I know she was 100% happy with it.

    Thanks @Obsolesce for the info and link, much appreciated. I'm starting to lean towards the Nikon D3500, if for no other reason than it can take alot of photos before it needs a recharge. This is useful as I go away into the bush alot away from mains power.

    But this is a huge market, so I won't be surprised if I change my mind.

    Yeah I don't know about the pictures thing because my wife took thousands of pictures before needing to charge it. I'm not sure why it is so low.

    For example, we got it before our Grand Canyon trip, and we took so many thousands of mostly pictures and some videos during the day before having to charge it at night. That number doesn't make any sense to me.

    EDIT: She had multiple batteries (just asked her) and she thought it was worth it being mirrorless vs a DSLR camera.

    Oh yep. That's my next thing to read up on. What's all this 'mirrorless' stuff about?

    That is 100% subjective and depends on the individual.

    One thing I know off the bat is that mirrorless cameras are smaller and that could be a pro for one, or con for another. So portability I guess.

    Again, I'm not the camera expert so anything after the example above is me simply reading from google. Here's something:
    https://www.tomsguide.com/us/dslr-vs-mirrorless-cameras,news-17736.html



  • @siringo said in Any Camera People Here?:

    @Obsolesce said in Any Camera People Here?:

    @siringo said in Any Camera People Here?:

    @Obsolesce said in Any Camera People Here?:

    It comes down to specifically what you require... here's a pretty detailed comparison.

    https://www.apotelyt.com/compare-camera/nikon-d3500-vs-sony-a6000

    I'm not the camera person, so unfortunately I don't know what all factors went into the decision. But I know she was 100% happy with it.

    Thanks @Obsolesce for the info and link, much appreciated. I'm starting to lean towards the Nikon D3500, if for no other reason than it can take alot of photos before it needs a recharge. This is useful as I go away into the bush alot away from mains power.

    But this is a huge market, so I won't be surprised if I change my mind.

    Yeah I don't know about the pictures thing because my wife took thousands of pictures before needing to charge it. I'm not sure why it is so low.

    For example, we got it before our Grand Canyon trip, and we took so many thousands of mostly pictures and some videos during the day before having to charge it at night. That number doesn't make any sense to me.

    EDIT: She had multiple batteries (just asked her) and she thought it was worth it being mirrorless vs a DSLR camera.

    Oh yep. That's my next thing to read up on. What's all this 'mirrorless' stuff about?

    SLRs have mirrors. Mirrors take time to physically move and create a small vibration that can't be avoided, and are the most likely component for mechanical failure (this is why "shutter count" is a big deal on SLRs.) Mirrorless can be made cheaper, last longer, and is more stable. But require an extra digital screen to compensate to let you see stuff.

    I use Nikon for my SLR, and Panasonic for my mirrorless. Mirrorless is way better for casual users, and for many pros. unless you are a pro, you likely don't want a mirror.



  • @Obsolesce said in Any Camera People Here?:

    One thing I know off the bat is that mirrorless cameras are smaller and that could be a pro for one, or con for another. So portability I guess.

    Mirrorless CAN be smaller, but we only talk about mirrorless in the context of SLR-form factor. All non-SLR are mirrorless and always have been, even 100 years ago. SLR is the only body type capable of using a mirror, so mirror-less only exists in that context. So while you are correct that mirrorless can be smaller, they aren't discussed when they are smaller (or larger.)



  • @travisdh1 Yes but that wont go with his budget hence my recommendation.



  • @jmoore said in Any Camera People Here?:

    @travisdh1 Yes but that wont go with his budget hence my recommendation.

    Are you responding to my response to @scottalanmiller's DSLR comment? Then that wasn't even in relation to OP.



  • I'm looking down the DSLR track. I find with my smartphone that it's too small to handle when I take photos.

    I remembered I have an old SLR, I bought a Pentax MZ50 (I think that's the model) years ago, with an extra zoom lense and barely used it. Anyway, I find that so easy to hold. So I'm thinking a small device may not be the best fit for me????

    A guy I work with recently bought a Sony A6000, I'm going to see that next week & see what I think.

    Anyone know if the lenses for my SLR, Sigma brand will fit on Nikons???



  • @siringo said in Any Camera People Here?:

    Anyone know if the lenses for my SLR, Sigma brand will fit on Nikons???

    Yes, that's their point. Sigma, Tamrom, etc. are third party lens makers for the big boys (Nikon, Cannon, Pentax, etc.) But all those camera bodies have unique mounts, so it has to be a Sigma for Nikon, Sigma for Cannon, etc.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Any Camera People Here?:

    @siringo said in Any Camera People Here?:

    Anyone know if the lenses for my SLR, Sigma brand will fit on Nikons???

    Yes, that's their point. Sigma, Tamrom, etc. are third party lens makers for the big boys (Nikon, Cannon, Pentax, etc.) But all those camera bodies have unique mounts, so it has to be a Sigma for Nikon, Sigma for Cannon, etc.

    Good to know, thanks Scott.



  • @siringo said in Any Camera People Here?:

    A guy I work with recently bought a Sony A6000, I'm going to see that next week & see what I think.

    That's what my wife bought a few years ago and was 100% satisfied. But it's not a dslr, it's a mirror less camera. If you are only looking at dslr, the Sony a6000 isn't for you.



  • @MarigabyFrias and I both use Panasonic Lumix for our SLR form factor mirrorless cameras. High quality at a very reasonable price. Works great. It's not my Nikon, but it is also half the price.



  • The performance of a camera sensor depends on it's size. Larger sensor means better images but it also means larger lenses and a heavier camera. That's the law of physics.

    If you are satisfied with the images from your smartphone, you are basically satisfied with the smallest sensors and hence the lowest quality. You are not really the target group for a more advanced camera.

    You have a few different classes of cameras.

    1. Small sensor point-and-shoot
      These cameras have literally disappeared from the market and is now what a smartphone is used for. A more capable camera is bigger and also more advanced. A lot more advanced than a smartphone.

    2. Small Sensor
      The step up from the smartphone is a small sensor fixed lens camera. Usually comes with a superzoom that covers everything from a wide to a very long focal length.

    3. Crop sensor
      Next step up is large sensor cameras that has a significantly larger sensor compared to a smartphone but not as big as an analog 35mm film camera. Sensor sizes are for instance APS (also called crop sensor, DX) and M43. These usually have interchangeable lenses.

    4. Full frame sensor
      Next step up from that are full frame cameras which are the same size as 35mm SLRs, 24x36mm.
      Also with interchangeable lenses.

    5. Medium format sensor
      And then you have medium format cameras that are even bigger and are for high end professional work.
      Interchangeable is a must here.



  • But you can also go the other way and say you want a camera to use as a photographer. Not maybe for the optical performance but for the photographic experience.

    Then you might want "basic" features such as interchangeable lenses, manual focus, a viewfinder, manual exposure - things that point-and-shoot cameras/smartphones don't provide.

    A $500 budget is not a lot but will put you in the lower range of crop sensor cameras.

    Here you can look at some cameras and how they differ in size.
    Check especially out how they look from above as that will reveal the depth differences.
    https://camerasize.com/compare/



  • @Pete-S said in Any Camera People Here?:

    A $500 budget is not a lot but will put you in the lower range of crop sensor cameras.

    If you can just do away with the interchangeable lens, you can get pretty good for closer to $400.


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