Writing a good CV



  • I've seen a few people asking to review and comment on their curriculum vitae. But I need to start from scratch so thought it might be a good topic to help people improve theirs or help in general.

    So what should the structure look like. What should/shouldn't be included.

    Any tips from those that look at them and hire people



  • I've never needed a CV. I like to an areas at the top of my resume called summary of qualifications. Thata where I have my bullet points about my career history and career goals. It's also the area that I mold towards the job I want.



  • Screenshot_2019-05-09-05-50-11-829_com.google.android.apps.docs.png



  • @IRJ said in Writing a good CV:

    I've never needed a CV. I like to an areas at the top of my resume called summary of qualifications. Thata where I have my bullet points about my career history and career goals. It's also the area that I mold towards the job I want.

    Agreed - You don't want to list your qualifications below each previous employment, especailly if there is duplication of skills. List them once, and in one section, from the most important.



  • @IRJ said in Writing a good CV:

    Screenshot_2019-05-09-05-50-11-829_com.google.android.apps.docs.png

    Certifications -

    I am not sure I agree with how you've got those listed. You have put forth great effort to get (and maintain) them. Each should be listed as they are all a part of your skill set.



  • @gjacobse said in Writing a good CV:

    @IRJ said in Writing a good CV:

    Screenshot_2019-05-09-05-50-11-829_com.google.android.apps.docs.png

    Certifications -

    I am not sure I agree with how you've got those listed. You have put forth great effort to get (and maintain) them. Each should be listed as they are all a part of your skill set.

    I have them listed below this area. I just took a screenshot of the very top of my resume.



  • I wanted the "Summary of Qualifications" section to be the part that someone who only has 30 seconds reads. I list the certs individually below and include the certificate numbers and the dates so they can be verified right off my resume.

    I do feel like my resume has given me a major advantage in the job market. Having a clear , concise area is very important. I do list some of these skills again under my job descriptions as they are relevant to my positions.

    The Summary of Qualifications is my extremely short sales pitch. Alot of people have a similar area on their resume, but I have seen them include stuff like "customer service oriented" , "troubleshooting" , "support" , or other very general buzzword terms. It's a waste of time since customer service doesnt mean jack shit. If I am hiring somebody solely for customer service, I would hire them from Disney or hotel chain where that focus means much more to the actual job. Even then, it's a waste in my opinion. Who the hell is not going to say they are customer service oriented? Its not something like you specialize in unless you are a very specific position. Even in that case, it would be under your job description.



  • @IRJ said in Writing a good CV:

    I've never needed a CV. I like to an areas at the top of my resume called summary of qualifications.

    CV = Resume



  • A piece of advice that revolutionised my resume was this: your points should be something that no one else could say (if possible). If you pm me your email address I can show you my old and current resumes to compare.



  • @Kelly said in Writing a good CV:

    A piece of advice that revolutionised my resume was this: your points should be something that no one else could say (if possible). If you pm me your email address I can show you my old and current resumes to compare.

    You mean.... unique stuff not "knows Windows?"



  • Posting a snippet here for the sake of the thread's value:

    Old:

    • Reduced organizational IT operating costs by moving from costly closed source software to internally supported Linux based open source platforms and software
    • Transitioned key IT systems from ad-hoc, as-needed to standardized, centrally managed, and strategy focused; achieving improved uptime, customer service, and reducing overall costs

    New:
    System Transformation – Mapped existing, fragmented IT systems and benchmarked against industry standards. Redesigned and deployed a centrally managed solution that improved uptime by 20%, reduced support tickets and customer complaints, and increased our ability to effectively predict and manage costs while utilizing existing infrastructure.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Writing a good CV:

    @Kelly said in Writing a good CV:

    A piece of advice that revolutionised my resume was this: your points should be something that no one else could say (if possible). If you pm me your email address I can show you my old and current resumes to compare.

    You mean.... unique stuff not "knows Windows?"

    Good start 🙂



  • Another thing that held back my ability to create an effective CV/Resume is that I frequently didn't feel like I could assign a value to certain things, e.g. money saved, efficiencies created, etc. if I didn't have an empirical measurement of that thing. However, you are the expert on your systems and your work. You know when something is improved and can provide an educated estimate that is sufficient for a CV. Use that expertise. You don't have to lie or exaggerate. Instead give your best, professional estimate.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Writing a good CV:

    @IRJ said in Writing a good CV:

    I've never needed a CV. I like to an areas at the top of my resume called summary of qualifications.
    

    CV = Resume

    lol I was thinking cover letter



  • @IRJ said in Writing a good CV:

    @scottalanmiller said in Writing a good CV:

    @IRJ said in Writing a good CV:

    I've never needed a CV. I like to an areas at the top of my resume called summary of qualifications.
    

    CV = Resume

    lol I was thinking cover letter

    I figured. MOst of the world uses CV to mean what the US calls resume.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Writing a good CV:

    @IRJ said in Writing a good CV:

    @scottalanmiller said in Writing a good CV:

    @IRJ said in Writing a good CV:

    I've never needed a CV. I like to an areas at the top of my resume called summary of qualifications.
    

    CV = Resume

    lol I was thinking cover letter

    I figured. MOst of the world uses CV to mean what the US calls resume.

    Curriculum Vitae... Story of my life.



  • Yeah sorry should of just all names for it in the OP 🙂



  • All good points thanks, will start building something over the next day or two.



  • @Kelly said in Writing a good CV:

    Posting a snippet here for the sake of the thread's value:

    Old:

    • Reduced organizational IT operating costs by moving from costly closed source software to internally supported Linux based open source platforms and software
    • Transitioned key IT systems from ad-hoc, as-needed to standardized, centrally managed, and strategy focused; achieving improved uptime, customer service, and reducing overall costs

    New:
    System Transformation – Mapped existing, fragmented IT systems and benchmarked against industry standards. Redesigned and deployed a centrally managed solution that improved uptime by 20%, reduced support tickets and customer complaints, and increased our ability to effectively predict and manage costs while utilizing existing infrastructure.

    If I'm reading your resume, I'm not sure if this tells me anything that useful. I guess it depends on how big of a company you worked for. It's like politics, of course you will say anything you implement was the best thing ever. I could take from this that you have experience with ways to measure uptime, but apparently that's not the case?

    @IRJ 's advice is pure gold. I'm going to go update my resume now. Setting an overview and a context to read the rest of the resume can only have benefits.



  • @flaxking said in Writing a good CV:

    @Kelly said in Writing a good CV:

    Posting a snippet here for the sake of the thread's value:

    Old:

    • Reduced organizational IT operating costs by moving from costly closed source software to internally supported Linux based open source platforms and software
    • Transitioned key IT systems from ad-hoc, as-needed to standardized, centrally managed, and strategy focused; achieving improved uptime, customer service, and reducing overall costs

    New:
    System Transformation – Mapped existing, fragmented IT systems and benchmarked against industry standards. Redesigned and deployed a centrally managed solution that improved uptime by 20%, reduced support tickets and customer complaints, and increased our ability to effectively predict and manage costs while utilizing existing infrastructure.

    If I'm reading your resume, I'm not sure if this tells me anything that useful. I guess it depends on how big of a company you worked for. It's like politics, of course you will say anything you implement was the best thing ever. I could take from this that you have experience with ways to measure uptime, but apparently that's not the case?

    That is not how that reads to me at all.



  • How do you judge if a resume is successful or not? I really have no idea. As an employer, I was only really interested in who a person worked for, for how long, and what their job title was. Stuff about, for example, "system transformation", like Kelly's example, just went straight through me - it meant nothing to me. But for other employers, that stuff might be gold and just what they're looking for.

    The other issue is that your resume normally has to go through at least two people - firstly, an employment agent, and then the employer. So who do you target, as they are two very different audiences? An agent will probably spend 20 seconds reading your resume, looking for keywords, whilst an employer might spend ten minutes, especially if they're interviewing you.

    I do like to hear about hobbies, especially interesting ones. I think you can tell a lot about a person by his hobbies. But it's de rigueur to leave these off these days, sadly. Probably for the best.



  • @Kelly said in Writing a good CV:

    System Transformation – Mapped existing, fragmented IT systems and benchmarked against industry standards. Redesigned and deployed a centrally managed solution that improved uptime by 20%, reduced support tickets and customer complaints, and increased our ability to effectively predict and manage costs while utilizing existing infrastructure.

    Too many meaningless buzz words. The 20% sounds nice, but like @Carnival-Boy pointed out there is no way to confirm. What benchmarks did you use? Even if my company is working against NIST standards, I would still like to hear if you implemented against ISO standards. They are very similar in the way they are handled. But I have no way of knowing if you were bench marked against a major standard or something more minor like CIS or HIPAA. That stuff matters because they are different levels of compliance.

    What centrally managed solution? How did you reduce costs?

    It is very vanilla and vague. Not a single point is clear to me.



  • @Carnival-Boy said in Writing a good CV:

    How do you judge if a resume is successful or not? I really have no idea. As an employer, I was only really interested in who a person worked for, for how long, and what their job title was. Stuff about, for example, "system transformation", like Kelly's example, just went straight through me - it meant nothing to me. But for other employers, that stuff might be gold and just what they're looking for.

    Same here, that stuff looks like filler to me. I can't quantify it, so I ignore it.



  • And you all are not my intended audience. Many of the comments appear to be coming from a peer level of evaluation. Most likely I won't be able to talk to peers until in person or maybe during a phone interview. The problem is that a CV has to pass between 2 and 3 layers before it would hit a person who would care about the things you're mentioning, depending on the position applied for. (This resume was aimed at management/project management, so that affects how it is written and who the intended audience is.) The first stage in many companies requires you to make through an applicant tracking system that is generally keyword based. This requires many buzzwords. The second level is often HR. They are also very keyword based. The next level is usually a hiring manager/team. If you're not hiring into a an IT team under an IT leader it needs to be oriented towards the decision maker. If they are not in IT they don't care what tools I used. They want to see that I improved the systems at a previous employer in a way they can quantify and wrap their heads around. By the time I get to the people who would want those questions answered it is frequently face-to-face where they can ask those questions and I can give them clear, thorough answers that I can't in a resume format.

    The question was asked above, how do you judge the success of a resume. It is difficult. However, after doing the rewrite that included the section I excerpted I immediately had 4 follow-up contacts with 2 leading to interviews. Significantly higher than before. Perhaps my original resume was so much garbage and the second is mediocre. I don't know, but I have been more successful in my search utilising the newer one. If any of you are interested in getting the two to look at for your own benefit feel free to pm me.



  • I've been looking at this again and looking for a good layout/template.
    So google I went.
    What are you views on having a Skill rating on your CV?
    e.g.
    skills.png

    My view is how do you rate your own skills. But I don't like the look.



  • @hobbit666 said in Writing a good CV:

    I've been looking at this again and looking for a good layout/template.
    So google I went.
    What are you views on having a Skill rating on your CV?
    e.g.
    skills.png

    My view is how do you rate your own skills. But I don't like the look.

    Extremely ridiculous if you ask me. A huge part of a resume is marketing yourself, and in IT if I have touched it before (even if I haven't) then I am fairly confident I can complete a task assigned to me on that subject. That being said, I dont put everything on my resume.

    For example, I wouldn't put that I am an HTML coder because it isn't something I feel is relevant or something I want to do. So essentially I am setting that skill at 0 which is fine. But if it's about my core duties and I list it on my resume. I rank myself at pretty much 100 or able to accomplish any task.

    Nobody in IT seriously expects you to know everything, but if it is highlighted in your resume, you should be highly skilled in that task. Enough where you feel confident to tackle it in the day to day.



  • @hobbit666 said in Writing a good CV:

    I've been looking at this again and looking for a good layout/template.
    So google I went.
    What are you views on having a Skill rating on your CV?
    e.g.
    skills.png

    Also wtf does a bar line graph mean to me or a circle pie graph. Do I say wow this guy is betwen 70-90% in Strategy. Seriously wtf does that mean? The whole rating yourself on a graph or bar is so ridiculous when you just think about it how irrelevant it really is.



  • @IRJ My thought as well just wanted to check lol


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