Network Devices - CompTIA A+ 220-1001 Prof Messer





  • Do you need a specific type of ethernet cable to utilize PoE?



  • @connorsoliver said in Network Devices - CompTIA A+ 220-1001 Prof Messer:

    Do you need a specific type of ethernet cable to utilize PoE?

    In my experience, No special cables. t.
    I use PoE at home for a unifi AP using a standard Ethernet cable



  • @connorsoliver said in Network Devices - CompTIA A+ 220-1001 Prof Messer:

    Do you need a specific type of ethernet cable to utilize PoE?

    Any standard Ethernet copper cabling like CAT5, CAT5e, CAT6, CAT6a, CAT7, CAT8 will all do it.



  • Where would a firewall be installed for a large company? Before the trafic point or just in a specific spot for a specific part of the network that you want to protect? Is that even possible?



  • @mary said in Network Devices - CompTIA A+ 220-1001 Prof Messer:

    Where would a firewall be installed for a large company? Before the trafic point or just in a specific spot for a specific part of the network that you want to protect?

    At a minimum in two places in ANY competent company of any size, including just home users...

    1. At the network perimeter. This is the ingress and egress point of the network from the outside world. Your firewall/router is literally the device that allows your network to connect to the Internet, it is the barrier device. So skipping a firewall here is all but impossible technically, anyway. This is the main firewall and what people mean when they say "their firewall". This allows you to control and view all traffic entering or leaving your network. This is your network's first line of defense and where you protect against network threats from the "outside."

    2. On every device on the network. Every "real" device like a computer has its own firewall that is just for itself. This is the "last line of network defense" for your systems and is where you protect against network threats coming from your own network.




  • Additionally, larger companies often have other firewalls. Sometimes there have two before the network itself is exposed. One touches the Internet, one touches the LAN, and both share connections in another network known as a DMZ. This is more work to maintain, but gives two chances to stop attacks before touching your critical systems and allows you to have two different types or brands of firewall in the critical path so if one is breached (like Cisco famously is with all of its vulnerabilities) then you can have a totally different kind still there to protect you. Often services are hosted from within the DMZ to keep them from being exposed to your internal systems as well.



  • Beyond that, larger companies will often have firewalls placed throughout their internal networks. Small companies often only have one network of their own. Larger ones often have many either because size dictates that they must, or because they want to segment their traffic for security reasons (like applying one security policy to the finance department and another to the event planning department.) To keep those networks able to communicate, but limiting how they communicate, they use firewalls.