DNS woes



  • I don't know enough about DNS to make a good decision here.

    We have a few new domains registered with godaddy. They will be used for services that will run on our colo servers.

    Options:

    • Use Godaddys standard name servers?
    • Point my domain to some other name servers somewhere else like cloudflare?
    • Host my own name servers in the colo where the servers are?

    If I understand correctly, DNS propagates everywhere anyway so what difference does it make? Or are the DNS records not cached/replicated?

    Well, you see the problem. What do you suggest?



  • @Pete-S said in DNS woes:

    Use Godaddys standard name servers?

    I know of no case where that would be good. Rule this out before starting.



  • @Pete-S said in DNS woes:

    Point my domain to some other name servers somewhere else like cloudflare?

    Always do this. CloudFlare is many peoples' preferred, but there are others. But this model, overall, is the only valid one.



  • @Pete-S said in DNS woes:

    Host my own name servers in the colo where the servers are?

    This is a "never". This is because DNS has reached "free" for the best, most enterprise options out there. DNS is the "leading" commodity service on the market today and as such is the most "never consider running your own infrastructure" product that there is. It's so dramatically so, that running your own DNS servers went away in the late 1990s. Back then it wasn't free yet, but so cheap to go enterprise that you couldn't do it yourself. But since CloudFlare and a few others came around taking DNS to yet another level of quality and reducing the cost to zero, even the cost of discussing DNS options is too high.



  • @Pete-S said in DNS woes:

    If I understand correctly, DNS propagates everywhere anyway so what difference does it make? Or are the DNS records not cached/replicated?

    It does, and they do. Propagation, caching, etc. all happens with DNS. But that doesn't mean that you don't still want your master DNS to be screaming fast, globally distributed, highly available, etc. If your DNS goes down, most DNS providers (Google, etc.) will known almost immediately and see your infrastructure as offline as part of their security system.