Never Give More than Two Weeks Notice



  • @Dashrender said in Never Give More than Two Weeks Notice:

    @DustinB3403 said in Never Give More than Two Weeks Notice:

    @scottalanmiller said in Never Give More than Two Weeks Notice:

    @DustinB3403 said in Never Give More than Two Weeks Notice:

    @scottalanmiller is just as off on this as you are @Dashrender. Imagine if the receptionist called OSHA because you were punching down cables on your block and pinched your finger?

    And you think this applies to what we are discussing how? This is out of the blue and a tangent. Not what anyone here was discussing.

    Is there a specific example to discuss? I've provided one. An employee who has called OSHA over something perceived to be dangerous.

    Actually that kind of crazy happens all the time to OSHA - people call and lodge complaints, and OSHA makes a call to follow up or not. In your example of a receptionist calling - the OSHA person would probably do somethign like this - This is a receptionist - it's likely she has no idea what's safe or not regarding punch downs - thanks for reporting it, we'll log this call. have a nice day.

    Then it would be logged and forgotten.

    But if the receptionist is the OSHA Safety Person....



  • @DustinB3403 said in Never Give More than Two Weeks Notice:

    @scottalanmiller said in Never Give More than Two Weeks Notice:

    @DustinB3403 said in Never Give More than Two Weeks Notice:

    @scottalanmiller said in Never Give More than Two Weeks Notice:

    @DustinB3403 said in Never Give More than Two Weeks Notice:

    @scottalanmiller is just as off on this as you are @Dashrender. Imagine if the receptionist called OSHA because you were punching down cables on your block and pinched your finger?

    And you think this applies to what we are discussing how? This is out of the blue and a tangent. Not what anyone here was discussing.

    Is there a specific example to discuss? I've provided one. An employee who has called OSHA over something perceived to be dangerous.

    We weren't asking for examples. No need for something so weird.

    Employer asks employee to do something unsafe, employee say "no, that's unsafe". Employer says "tough, do it anyway". Employee calls OSHA.

    Simple, obvious, common sense. How it all is supposed to work.

    Taking your example

    Employer ask employee to take out trash, employee says no I could slip and fall because of the ice. Employee calls OSHA.

    Wasted effort.

    Sure. Wasted effort is part of the game, nothing changes that. Whether they are calling OSHA and wasting time or calling an inspector. They might not agree with the internal person and call OSHA anyway.



  • OH&S (in Canada) was a part of my apprenticeship schooling. Both the employer and the employee have responsibilities, but if you ever actually report anything that can be traced back to you in a company of less than 200 people, you might as well start job searching.

    But if your employer still asks you to do something if you tell them you don't think it is safe, it's probably time to start looking anyway. The biggest problem I see is that employees will not tell the employer they think the work is not safe.



  • @flaxking said in Never Give More than Two Weeks Notice:

    OH&S (in Canada) was a part of my apprenticeship schooling. Both the employer and the employee have responsibilities, but if you ever actually report anything that can be traced back to you in a company of less than 200 people, you might as well start job searching.

    But if your employer still asks you to do something if you tell them you don't think it is safe, it's probably time to start looking anyway. The biggest problem I see is that employees will not tell the employer they think the work is not safe.

    that's the issue everyone, no employee wants to put their livelihood at risk. It's why there should be an impartial safety officer who comes to a reasonable level for both the business and employee.

    Even if that safety person is the receptionist!



  • @DustinB3403 said in Never Give More than Two Weeks Notice:

    @flaxking said in Never Give More than Two Weeks Notice:

    OH&S (in Canada) was a part of my apprenticeship schooling. Both the employer and the employee have responsibilities, but if you ever actually report anything that can be traced back to you in a company of less than 200 people, you might as well start job searching.

    But if your employer still asks you to do something if you tell them you don't think it is safe, it's probably time to start looking anyway. The biggest problem I see is that employees will not tell the employer they think the work is not safe.

    that's the issue everyone, no employee wants to put their livelihood at risk. It's why there should be an impartial safety officer who comes to a reasonable level for both the business and employee.

    Even if that safety person is the receptionist!

    Are you going to give all these businesses money to train these people?

    Shut up already.



  • @JaredBusch said in Never Give More than Two Weeks Notice:

    @DustinB3403 said in Never Give More than Two Weeks Notice:

    @flaxking said in Never Give More than Two Weeks Notice:

    OH&S (in Canada) was a part of my apprenticeship schooling. Both the employer and the employee have responsibilities, but if you ever actually report anything that can be traced back to you in a company of less than 200 people, you might as well start job searching.

    But if your employer still asks you to do something if you tell them you don't think it is safe, it's probably time to start looking anyway. The biggest problem I see is that employees will not tell the employer they think the work is not safe.

    that's the issue everyone, no employee wants to put their livelihood at risk. It's why there should be an impartial safety officer who comes to a reasonable level for both the business and employee.

    Even if that safety person is the receptionist!

    Are you going to give all these businesses money to train these people?

    Shut up already.

    Training is a part of almost every job. "This is how we <insert function>"



  • @flaxking said in Never Give More than Two Weeks Notice:

    OH&S (in Canada) was a part of my apprenticeship schooling. Both the employer and the employee have responsibilities, but if you ever actually report anything that can be traced back to you in a company of less than 200 people, you might as well start job searching.

    But if your employer still asks you to do something if you tell them you don't think it is safe, it's probably time to start looking anyway. The biggest problem I see is that employees will not tell the employer they think the work is not safe.

    In the US those ridiculous protections are only for companies under 11 people. Once you hit 11, you are protected. 10 and under, zero protections.

    It's a key reason why I don't often support the idea of "main street" businesses. They are often just ways to dodge employee protection laws.



  • @flaxking said in Never Give More than Two Weeks Notice:

    But if your employer still asks you to do something if you tell them you don't think it is safe, it's probably time to start looking anyway. The biggest problem I see is that employees will not tell the employer they think the work is not safe.

    I know quite a few bloodsucking lawyers in my area that would be foaming at the mouth for an oppurtunity like this... Employee reports violation to OSHA and then employee gets fired..



  • @IRJ said in Never Give More than Two Weeks Notice:

    @flaxking said in Never Give More than Two Weeks Notice:

    But if your employer still asks you to do something if you tell them you don't think it is safe, it's probably time to start looking anyway. The biggest problem I see is that employees will not tell the employer they think the work is not safe.

    I know quite a few bloodsucking lawyers in my area that would be foaming at the mouth for an oppurtunity like this... Employee reports violation to OSHA and then employee gets fired..

    Whistleblower protections are a pretty big deal in the US.



  • @IRJ said in Never Give More than Two Weeks Notice:

    @flaxking said in Never Give More than Two Weeks Notice:

    But if your employer still asks you to do something if you tell them you don't think it is safe, it's probably time to start looking anyway. The biggest problem I see is that employees will not tell the employer they think the work is not safe.

    I know quite a few bloodsucking lawyers in my area that would be foaming at the mouth for an oppurtunity like this... Employee reports violation to OSHA and then employee gets fired..

    Yeah, good way to get the crap sued out of you. Of course, 99% of employees don't sue no matter what, so it's often a safe bet and that's why companies take those bets.



  • @coliver said in Never Give More than Two Weeks Notice:

    @IRJ said in Never Give More than Two Weeks Notice:

    @flaxking said in Never Give More than Two Weeks Notice:

    But if your employer still asks you to do something if you tell them you don't think it is safe, it's probably time to start looking anyway. The biggest problem I see is that employees will not tell the employer they think the work is not safe.

    I know quite a few bloodsucking lawyers in my area that would be foaming at the mouth for an oppurtunity like this... Employee reports violation to OSHA and then employee gets fired..

    Whistleblower protections are a pretty big deal in the US.

    Still doesn't mean you'd want to continue to work for a company after you've blown that whistle.



  • @DustinB3403 said in Never Give More than Two Weeks Notice:

    @coliver said in Never Give More than Two Weeks Notice:

    @IRJ said in Never Give More than Two Weeks Notice:

    @flaxking said in Never Give More than Two Weeks Notice:

    But if your employer still asks you to do something if you tell them you don't think it is safe, it's probably time to start looking anyway. The biggest problem I see is that employees will not tell the employer they think the work is not safe.

    I know quite a few bloodsucking lawyers in my area that would be foaming at the mouth for an oppurtunity like this... Employee reports violation to OSHA and then employee gets fired..

    Whistleblower protections are a pretty big deal in the US.

    Still doesn't mean you'd want to continue to work for a company after you've blown that whistle.

    Exactly - and while they might not fire you over being reported - they'll just bide their time and fire you for something stupid later - or just downsize you... at will employment.



  • @Dashrender said in Never Give More than Two Weeks Notice:

    @DustinB3403 said in Never Give More than Two Weeks Notice:

    @coliver said in Never Give More than Two Weeks Notice:

    @IRJ said in Never Give More than Two Weeks Notice:

    @flaxking said in Never Give More than Two Weeks Notice:

    But if your employer still asks you to do something if you tell them you don't think it is safe, it's probably time to start looking anyway. The biggest problem I see is that employees will not tell the employer they think the work is not safe.

    I know quite a few bloodsucking lawyers in my area that would be foaming at the mouth for an oppurtunity like this... Employee reports violation to OSHA and then employee gets fired..

    Whistleblower protections are a pretty big deal in the US.

    Still doesn't mean you'd want to continue to work for a company after you've blown that whistle.

    Exactly - and while they might not fire you over being reported - they'll just bide their time and fire you for something stupid later - or just downsize you... at will employment.

    Biding time to fire someone is hard to do. Takes a long time and the risk is that they will still call you for firing them for the whistleblowing. Just because it is a long time later, doesn't get them out of it. Discrimination laws make the "at will" thing not nearly as "at will" as people imagine. The "anyone can fire you anytime" this is not at all true, it actually applies to far fewer people than you think.



  • daily_picdump_3036_640_high_15.jpg



  • @scottalanmiller someone is salty with Joe.


Log in to reply