Nextcloud Conflicts When Saving a File (Single User Scenario)



  • I am working on a very small software project and when I save a file (the only file in that directory), Nextcloud often seems to feel that the version stored on the server is newer than the version I just stored and makes the newest version a conflict file and reverts to the server version, which can be very damaging if I am not aware of it. I have not found many people describing this problem (one I did find was "Single user file conflicts on every save/change").

    So, just to make it clear, I am the only person editing that file, which is not shared ! ! In fact, I am the only user on the system.

    A similar problem occurs when I rename a file, where the file often reappears with the old filename. I have even seen a few cases where a deleted file was resurrected from the server instead of getting deleted there too.

    The problem has been persistent across at least one but more likely a couple of Nextcloud versions and is driving me even more bonkers than I already am. If I do not find a solution, I cannot see how I can keep using Nextcloud as this is just too irritating as well as a disaster in waiting.

    My setup is Nextcloud Client on a Debian laptop to a Debian firewall with nginx that redirects to a Raspbian machine with Nextcloud server (13) on a MariaDB database. I originally used SQLite3 but changed to MariaDB because of these problems. I can see that the setup described in the referenced link is similar to mine, so maybe nginx or the Raspberry Pi (or the combination) constitute the problem. Unfortunately I have limited free time to inverstigate the problem and would therefore love to hear if anyone has some ideas.



  • My first guess would be and not enough horsepower running next cloud and things are getting confused during the time it takes to sync.



  • Not seen that. It does sound like maybe the system is heavily underpowered, NextCloud is a pretty big, heavy application. We throw a lot of resources at it, even for very light use. Something like this on a Raspberry Pi isn't really viable. You can do it, but only as a proof of concept, not for real usage.



  • The use of MariaDB might actually make this worse as that greatly increases the RAM and CPU requirements to run the system over SQLite.



  • NextCloud 13 is quite a bit behind. We are on 15.0.2 now. Might be worth updating just to be sure that that does not address the issue on its own.



  • This might sound silly, but check the time on your machine and on the NextCloud server. Are they off from each other? Maybe one or the other actually is recording the time out of sync?



  • @SemperOSS said in Nextcloud Conflicts When Saving a File (Single User Scenario):

    I am working on a very small software project and when I save a file (the only file in that directory), Nextcloud often seems to feel that the version stored on the server is newer than the version I just stored and makes the newest version a conflict file and reverts to the server version, which can be very damaging if I am not aware of it.

    What task are you using NextCloud for with development? You aren't trying to store code in it, are you? NextCloud would not be a good replacement to a git repository, for example.



  • As a matter of troubleshooting... Check and make sure that the Client's time and the NextCloud server's time are set correctly.



  • @scottalanmiller & @dafyre: That was my first idea, but all the computers are within milliseconds of each other as best I can measure, thanks to NTP — and I do expect that Nextcloud can accept a clock difference that is in the same order of magnitude as the package latency over the network or even less.



  • @StrongBad I use Nextcloud to automatically save essential files on my computers, giving me seamless access to these files from my other computers. Very rarely are two computers turned on at the same time but it provides me with some convenience when I change from one computer to the other — and sometimes the web access to Nextcloud proves a life-saver ( well, not literally 😉 ) when I need access to files when I am out and about without access to my own laptop or for quickly sharing files.

    It is not used as a repository for my source code.



  • @JaredBusch & @scottalanmiller: Thank you for your response.

    I'll probably have to throw some beefier hardware after it then as other suggestions I have received do not seem to apply to my case. I had hoped the RPis would be enough as I have managed to get rid of most of the old "big iron" and replaced it with RPis (web server, mail server, backup server, home server, security server, ...).

    I had seen a post somewhere that the shift from SQLite to MariaDB should improve the stability for multi-user access and found it provided a slight improvement in performance as well — slightly surprising, I agree.

    I know this is difficult, but do you have any sugestion as to the processor power and RAM needed for a stable Nextcloud installation with light use, mostly single-user access? I am seriously trying to avoid installing a "proper" server again for space and power consumption reasons. (The RPis are in fact installed in friend's basement as his internet connection has a fixed IP address.)



  • @scottalanmiller Thanks. I will try upgrading to the latest version.



  • @SemperOSS said in Nextcloud Conflicts When Saving a File (Single User Scenario):

    @scottalanmiller Thanks. I will try upgrading to the latest version.

    Worth a shot at the very least.



  • @SemperOSS said in Nextcloud Conflicts When Saving a File (Single User Scenario):

    @scottalanmiller & @dafyre: That was my first idea, but all the computers are within milliseconds of each other as best I can measure, thanks to NTP — and I do expect that Nextcloud can accept a clock difference that is in the same order of magnitude as the package latency over the network or even less.

    Yeah, was just thinking it might be an hour off or more.



  • @SemperOSS said in Nextcloud Conflicts When Saving a File (Single User Scenario):

    @JaredBusch & @scottalanmiller: Thank you for your response.

    I'll probably have to throw some beefier hardware after it then as other suggestions I have received do not seem to apply to my case. I had hoped the RPis would be enough as I have managed to get rid of most of the old "big iron" and replaced it with RPis (web server, mail server, backup server, home server, security server, ...).

    I had seen a post somewhere that the shift from SQLite to MariaDB should improve the stability for multi-user access and found it provided a slight improvement in performance as well — slightly surprising, I agree.

    I know this is difficult, but do you have any sugestion as to the processor power and RAM needed for a stable Nextcloud installation with light use, mostly single-user access? I am seriously trying to avoid installing a "proper" server again for space and power consumption reasons. (The RPis are in fact installed in friend's basement as his internet connection has a fixed IP address.)

    Seems like a single small desktop device would have more computer power, and use less wall power, than using several small RPs, and be more flexible. Once you need more RPs than two or three in one place, they lose their value. If you only need one, that is different.

    It doesn't need a lot, but 2GB of RAM minimum for sure. I'd do 3GB if possible, you don't want it swapping.

    Minimum of 2 vCPU in a good VM on good hardware. Ours gets four.



  • @SemperOSS said in Nextcloud Conflicts When Saving a File (Single User Scenario):

    I had seen a post somewhere that the shift from SQLite to MariaDB should improve the stability for multi-user access and found it provided a slight improvement in performance as well — slightly surprising, I agree.

    Yes, but it does it through heavier utilization and thread competition, which might make the issue worse while making it feel faster. SQLite is "in thread" so can't have a race condition between the DB and the app.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Nextcloud Conflicts When Saving a File (Single User Scenario):

    @SemperOSS said in Nextcloud Conflicts When Saving a File (Single User Scenario):

    @JaredBusch & @scottalanmiller: Thank you for your response.

    I'll probably have to throw some beefier hardware after it then as other suggestions I have received do not seem to apply to my case. I had hoped the RPis would be enough as I have managed to get rid of most of the old "big iron" and replaced it with RPis (web server, mail server, backup server, home server, security server, ...).

    I had seen a post somewhere that the shift from SQLite to MariaDB should improve the stability for multi-user access and found it provided a slight improvement in performance as well — slightly surprising, I agree.

    I know this is difficult, but do you have any sugestion as to the processor power and RAM needed for a stable Nextcloud installation with light use, mostly single-user access? I am seriously trying to avoid installing a "proper" server again for space and power consumption reasons. (The RPis are in fact installed in friend's basement as his internet connection has a fixed IP address.)

    Seems like a single small desktop device would have more computer power, and use less wall power, than using several small RPs, and be more flexible. Once you need more RPs than two or three in one place, they lose their value. If you only need one, that is different.

    It doesn't need a lot, but 2GB of RAM minimum for sure. I'd do 3GB if possible, you don't want it swapping.

    Minimum of 2 vCPU in a good VM on good hardware. Ours gets four.

    This is a client system with an active 50ish sync client users all day long.
    d5dd23a1-424b-4368-963f-2870d0c23942-image.png

    Yeah it says ownCloud. THis was originally an ownCloud 7 VM on CentOS 7. It has been around a long ass time. Currently Nextcloud 14, no matter what @scottalanmiller says, NC 15 is not current as it is not in the stable release channel yet.
    62299bfc-8439-4cd4-8412-224d7b10c06c-image.png
    e740a1e0-59ce-4b54-afc6-8fe5095faff3-image.png



  • More stats from that system..
    1c7e6057-cf8f-44d6-83c3-c5075bab2cc2-image.png

    a1ed1b98-b6b6-4a2e-9e66-4cd37c73a897-image.png



  • This is the sysem that I use for work.
    f1ef56be-6669-4c8d-9005-745e991c9894-image.png

    We only have 6 active users. All use the Sync Client.

    We never have any issues with conflict files.