Fedora install weirdness



  • After all the recent talk about KVM, I decided to give it a go. I'm going to make another post later about actually installing it, instead this post is about some post install weirdness.

    FYI - I used a Netinst ISO to do the install, selected Fedora Server > Headless Virtualization as the only option. I allowed the disk to be partitioned automatically, I did NOT set a hostname nor an IP address. I did set a root password and a first user account.

    Upon logging in, I was presented with

     Webconsole https://cmosely-l01.mydomain.com:9090 or https://192.168.1.100:9090
    

    uh, what? Where did it get that machine name from? As I said above, I did not provide a host name during the install.

    (*note - I assume this must be related to DNS somehow)

    Also, now when looking at my storage I see this
    498c0e2a-2634-412f-8449-a42ca2aa31cb-image.png

    The blurred out text is the name of one of the computers on my AD domain - of which this new Fedora box knows (or at least should know) nothing about. There is no matching of passwords between the accounts, etc. I'm completely at a loss where this name could have come from.

    FYI - this is installed on a HP DL380 G8



  • Does reverse DNS lookup on the IP 192.168.1.100 result in that PC name?



  • @JaredBusch said in Fedora install weirdness:

    Does reverse DNS lookup on the IP 192.168.1.100 result in that PC name?

    Yes it does, which I suspected was the case. Is it normal for Linux distros to pull a host name from reverse DNS? If the answer is, yes - ok fine. that answers that question.

    But that doesn't answer the storage name question - which is really the much more bizarre one.



  • @Dashrender said in Fedora install weirdness:

    @JaredBusch said in Fedora install weirdness:

    Does reverse DNS lookup on the IP 192.168.1.100 result in that PC name?

    Yes it does, which I suspected was the case. Is it normal for Linux distros to pull a host name from reverse DNS? If the answer is, yes - ok fine. that answers that question.

    But that doesn't answer the storage name question - which is really the much more bizarre one.

    That never happens in my networks so I have no idea. I don't let things do that.



  • @JaredBusch said in Fedora install weirdness:

    @Dashrender said in Fedora install weirdness:

    @JaredBusch said in Fedora install weirdness:

    Does reverse DNS lookup on the IP 192.168.1.100 result in that PC name?

    Yes it does, which I suspected was the case. Is it normal for Linux distros to pull a host name from reverse DNS? If the answer is, yes - ok fine. that answers that question.

    But that doesn't answer the storage name question - which is really the much more bizarre one.

    That never happens in my networks so I have no idea. I don't let things do that.

    eh - what? let things do what? I didn't 'let' Fedora pull from reverse DNS - it did it completely on it's own.

    If you're saying that you never don't put in a host name during install - I guess congrats are in order?

    As for reverse DNS still having an entry - it hadn't been scavenged yet, that's set for 30 days, and the fact that it pulled this name in didn't hurt anything, it was simply odd.



  • @Dashrender said in Fedora install weirdness:

    As for reverse DNS still having an entry - it hadn't been scavenged yet, that's set for 30 days, and the fact that it pulled this name in didn't hurt anything, it was simply odd.

    IMO, if using DHCP with DNS settings, not setting an IP or host name during install, I would expect the results you received.

    I always set the host name and IP so I have not never run into this issue personally.



  • @Dashrender said in Fedora install weirdness:

    @JaredBusch said in Fedora install weirdness:

    Does reverse DNS lookup on the IP 192.168.1.100 result in that PC name?

    Yes it does, which I suspected was the case. Is it normal for Linux distros to pull a host name from reverse DNS? If the answer is, yes - ok fine. that answers that question.

    But that doesn't answer the storage name question - which is really the much more bizarre one.

    If you leave the hostname blank during install, it has two choices. Make up something totally random (Microsoft's way) or to look up what you've set the network to tell it its name is.

    In reality, what you are seeing here isn't weird in the least. It's the logical, polished way to handle it. It asks your network what its name is, it is told, it sets it automatically. Way more solid and predictable than Microsoft's "make some gibberish" method. That's what is weird. This is not weird.



  • @Dashrender said in Fedora install weirdness:

    As for reverse DNS still having an entry - it hadn't been scavenged yet, that's set for 30 days, and the fact that it pulled this name in didn't hurt anything, it was simply odd.

    How do you define that as odd? Isn't this the least odd possible thing?



  • @pmoncho said in Fedora install weirdness:

    @Dashrender said in Fedora install weirdness:

    As for reverse DNS still having an entry - it hadn't been scavenged yet, that's set for 30 days, and the fact that it pulled this name in didn't hurt anything, it was simply odd.

    IMO, if using DHCP with DNS settings, not setting an IP or host name during install, I would expect the results you received.

    I always set the host name and IP so I have not never run into this issue personally.

    Same here. But if you have an infrastructure team doing one part and a build team doing another, using the DNS settings to push names via DHCP reservations or whatever is a part of build automation. So about the most clear and obvious and useful possible setup.

    It only seems weird to people used to Windows where even with AD there isn't quite this much polish and automation. It's the expectation of "Windows like, less polished behaviour" that makes this seem odd.



  • @Dashrender said in Fedora install weirdness:

    The blurred out text is the name of one of the computers on my AD domain - of which this new Fedora box knows (or at least should know) nothing about.

    I bet you'll find it's in a DNS record somewhere, too.



  • @pmoncho said in Fedora install weirdness:

    I always set the host name and IP so I have not never run into this issue personally.

    Setting the hostname, of course. but setting the IP? Never. DHCP reservation, unless a hypervisor, router, or DHCP/AD/type server.



  • @Dashrender said in Fedora install weirdness:

    I did NOT set a hostname

    I know that Windows doesn't let you specify during initial install anymore. Such a stupid thing.



  • @JaredBusch said in Fedora install weirdness:

    @pmoncho said in Fedora install weirdness:

    I always set the host name and IP so I have not never run into this issue personally.

    Setting the hostname, of course. but setting the IP? Never. DHCP reservation, unless a hypervisor, router, or DHCP/AD/type server.

    DHCP Reservations would be a form of setting the IP.



  • @JaredBusch said in Fedora install weirdness:

    @Dashrender said in Fedora install weirdness:

    I did NOT set a hostname

    I know that Windows doesn't let you specify during initial install anymore. Such a stupid thing.

    Causes so many unnecessary steps and/or headaches for us. It's ridiculous. Such a trivial thing, made so hard.



  • @JaredBusch said in Fedora install weirdness:

    @pmoncho said in Fedora install weirdness:

    I always set the host name and IP so I have not never run into this issue personally.

    Setting the hostname, of course. but setting the IP? Never. DHCP reservation, unless a hypervisor, router, or DHCP/AD/type server.

    In regards to the amount of work, isn't Static IP basically the same as a DHCP reservation?



  • @scottalanmiller said in Fedora install weirdness:

    @Dashrender said in Fedora install weirdness:

    As for reverse DNS still having an entry - it hadn't been scavenged yet, that's set for 30 days, and the fact that it pulled this name in didn't hurt anything, it was simply odd.

    How do you define that as odd? Isn't this the least odd possible thing?

    I see your point - but what are the chances that you're going to have reverse DNS setup before setting up the server? I know I've NEVER done it on purpose. The only worked because DHCP gave an IP to my server that happened to coincide with an existing reverse DNS entry, which only existed because it hadn't been scavenged yet, so the situation seems odd to me.

    If a hostname is critical, then I expect the machine to demand I provide one - it does irk me that MS doesn't prompt for a computername during install. Of course, no one said it was critical.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Fedora install weirdness:

    @JaredBusch said in Fedora install weirdness:

    @Dashrender said in Fedora install weirdness:

    I did NOT set a hostname

    I know that Windows doesn't let you specify during initial install anymore. Such a stupid thing.

    Causes so many unnecessary steps and/or headaches for us. It's ridiculous. Such a trivial thing, made so hard.

    @scottalanmiller said in Fedora install weirdness:

    @JaredBusch said in Fedora install weirdness:

    @Dashrender said in Fedora install weirdness:

    I did NOT set a hostname

    I know that Windows doesn't let you specify during initial install anymore. Such a stupid thing.

    Causes so many unnecessary steps and/or headaches for us. It's ridiculous. Such a trivial thing, made so hard.

    No doubt.

    I like the old SCO UNIX 5.6 and prior install routine. Answer all needed questions with 4 screens and let it install. No muss, no fuss and all is set after it reboots. It was nice.



  • @pmoncho said in Fedora install weirdness:

    @JaredBusch said in Fedora install weirdness:

    @pmoncho said in Fedora install weirdness:

    I always set the host name and IP so I have not never run into this issue personally.

    Setting the hostname, of course. but setting the IP? Never. DHCP reservation, unless a hypervisor, router, or DHCP/AD/type server.

    In regards to the amount of work, isn't Static IP basically the same as a DHCP reservation?

    Up front, yes. Long term, generally no.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Fedora install weirdness:

    @Dashrender said in Fedora install weirdness:

    The blurred out text is the name of one of the computers on my AD domain - of which this new Fedora box knows (or at least should know) nothing about.

    I bet you'll find it's in a DNS record somewhere, too.

    Of course - the new IP it has on the new subnet it's part of.



  • @Dashrender said in Fedora install weirdness:

    @scottalanmiller said in Fedora install weirdness:

    @Dashrender said in Fedora install weirdness:

    As for reverse DNS still having an entry - it hadn't been scavenged yet, that's set for 30 days, and the fact that it pulled this name in didn't hurt anything, it was simply odd.

    How do you define that as odd? Isn't this the least odd possible thing?

    I see your point - but what are the chances that you're going to have reverse DNS setup before setting up the server?

    In a business where they are planning their deployments and managing IT: extremely high.

    It's just the logical way to do it. Having haphazard records doesn't make logical sense. That's just sloppy. Basic infrastructure planning - using the tools you have as they are designed.



  • @Dashrender said in Fedora install weirdness:

    I know I've NEVER done it on purpose. The only worked because DHCP gave an IP to my server that happened to coincide with an existing reverse DNS entry, which only existed because it hadn't been scavenged yet, so the situation seems odd to me.

    Basically you have two issues. One, you aren't managing your system and just letting it exist. And two, you have the system not in place intentionally but using it as just part of an infrastructure that you didn't tie this system too. Had you put this system under AD to match the infrastructure you had chosen, it would have done exactly what it was supposed to do.

    You are falling into a weird space of running infrastructure haphazardly, and trying to run two different systems that share some infrastructure and not others, and seeing the management of the one messing with the other because you are keeping them blind to each other.



  • @Dashrender said in Fedora install weirdness:

    @scottalanmiller said in Fedora install weirdness:

    @Dashrender said in Fedora install weirdness:

    The blurred out text is the name of one of the computers on my AD domain - of which this new Fedora box knows (or at least should know) nothing about.

    I bet you'll find it's in a DNS record somewhere, too.

    Of course - the new IP it has on the new subnet it's part of.

    Well then, where is the confusing part?



  • @scottalanmiller said in Fedora install weirdness:

    @pmoncho said in Fedora install weirdness:

    @JaredBusch said in Fedora install weirdness:

    @pmoncho said in Fedora install weirdness:

    I always set the host name and IP so I have not never run into this issue personally.

    Setting the hostname, of course. but setting the IP? Never. DHCP reservation, unless a hypervisor, router, or DHCP/AD/type server.

    In regards to the amount of work, isn't Static IP basically the same as a DHCP reservation?

    Up front, yes. Long term, generally no.

    Not just generally no. Definitely no. Example, I moved a client from a /24 to a /23. Because it was almost all reservations, only like 4 systems had to have their network settings updated.

    The rest was just a reboot.



  • OK we've beat the hostname issue to death.

    What about the storage name? Where did that get it's name from?



  • @Dashrender said in Fedora install weirdness:

    OK we've beat the hostname issue to death.

    What about the storage name? Where did that get it's name from?

    I thought that we had moved onto that a bit ago.



  • @Dashrender said in Fedora install weirdness:

    OK we've beat the hostname issue to death.

    What about the storage name? Where did that get it's name from?

    It always creates that using the hostname that was assigned at install time. I always set that, and don't have reverse lookup records, so I don't see that happen. Makes total sense that it would tho.



  • @travisdh1 said in Fedora install weirdness:

    @Dashrender said in Fedora install weirdness:

    OK we've beat the hostname issue to death.

    What about the storage name? Where did that get it's name from?

    It always creates that using the hostname that was assigned at install time. I always set that, and don't have reverse lookup records, so I don't see that happen. Makes total sense that it would tho.

    OK - well, then this makes no sense what so ever - as I mentioned, I set no hostname, so fine, it pulled one form reverse DNS, but as you can see in my examples at the top.. the two DO NOT MATCH. What's in the hostname is totally different from whats in the storage name.

    08ff6fbf-8da9-458b-a992-82c4b92fb6b0-image.png

    vs

    1ea8061e-7a9e-4f68-b281-f36c8407b906-image.png

    The names don't match up at all. But the storage name is a the same as a computer on my network, is in DNS, but not on that IP in DNS, nor reverse DNS.



  • @Dashrender said in Fedora install weirdness:

    @travisdh1 said in Fedora install weirdness:

    @Dashrender said in Fedora install weirdness:

    OK we've beat the hostname issue to death.

    What about the storage name? Where did that get it's name from?

    It always creates that using the hostname that was assigned at install time. I always set that, and don't have reverse lookup records, so I don't see that happen. Makes total sense that it would tho.

    OK - well, then this makes no sense what so ever - as I mentioned, I set no hostname, so fine, it pulled one form reverse DNS, but as you can see in my examples at the top.. the two DO NOT MATCH. What's in the hostname is totally different from whats in the storage name.

    Ah, I missed that. Yeah, that is odd.



  • If you left the default hostname (localhost.localdomain) alone, the default storage name will be fedora-root and fedora-home.



  • @black3dynamite said in Fedora install weirdness:

    If you left the default hostname (localhost.localdomain) alone, the default storage name will be fedora-root and fedora-home.

    I would have thought so too - but you can clearly see that's not the case.


Log in to reply