Win10 vs Fedora 28: Boot speed



  • Dell Inspiron 13 5000 series 2n1 laptop
    Intel Core i5-7200U 7th Gen @2.5GHz
    8GB RAM 2133 MHz

    For whatever reason, running under Fedora - the system boot time seems excessive. I haven't sat and timed it as of yet, but I want to say it's nearly 5 minutes... Which to me and what I perceive that Linux should do, is excessive.

    Windows 10 seems to boot more than two times faster.

    So I have to question - what and why. and if there is anything I can do to resolve this. Without going back to Windows...

    Could a different distro operate better?
    @scottalanmiller



  • From what I've seen, Windows 10 is the fastest. Microsoft really has high speed booting down to a science. I think they beat everyone at that. Fedora seems quite a bit faster than Ubuntu, but both are very slow compared to Windows 10 on the same hardware.

    Sadly, just a place where Windows kicks butt over any Linux that I've seen. Not the biggest deal, but certainly a place where Fedora or Ubuntu could improve.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Win10 vs Fedora 28: Boot speed:

    From what I've seen, Windows 10 is the fastest. Microsoft really has high speed booting down to a science. I think they beat everyone at that. Fedora seems quite a bit faster than Ubuntu, but both are very slow compared to Windows 10 on the same hardware.

    Sadly, just a place where Windows kicks butt over any Linux that I've seen. Not the biggest deal, but certainly a place where Fedora or Ubuntu could improve.

    That is a bit frustrating considering the 'push' for getting away from MS and all of it's applications. I do know that I can improve performance some by putting in a SSD drive over the 7200RPM (SR) that's in it now. and I will at some point. Working on the priority list first.



  • @gjacobse said in Win10 vs Fedora 28: Boot speed:

    Could a different distro operate better?
    @scottalanmiller

    Different ones do differ, as do different desktop environments.

    Ubuntu has been dog slow for us (18.10) vs. Fedora (29). Easily takes twice as long to boot. Fedora we just don't notice it being lightning fast like Windows. Ubuntu we notice it taking forever.



  • @gjacobse said in Win10 vs Fedora 28: Boot speed:

    @scottalanmiller said in Win10 vs Fedora 28: Boot speed:

    From what I've seen, Windows 10 is the fastest. Microsoft really has high speed booting down to a science. I think they beat everyone at that. Fedora seems quite a bit faster than Ubuntu, but both are very slow compared to Windows 10 on the same hardware.

    Sadly, just a place where Windows kicks butt over any Linux that I've seen. Not the biggest deal, but certainly a place where Fedora or Ubuntu could improve.

    That is a bit frustrating considering the 'push' for getting away from MS and all of it's applications. I do know that I can improve performance some by putting in a SSD drive over the 7200RPM (SR) that's in it now. and I will at some point. Working on the priority list first.

    How does it impact you? How often are you rebooting? I boot in the morning when I start the day and just hit the power button before sitting down. It's up so fast, slow compared to Windows but still super fast, that I really don't notice. Ubuntu is slow enough that I would really notice, but not Fedora.

    While Windows is way better here, it's not a spot that actually affects me in any way.

    If you want a screaming fast Linux book, ChromeOS boots even faster than Windows. So it isn't Linux itself that's so slow, it is each individual OS and what all it loads and how it optimizes.



  • If you press F1 during boot you can see the boot process. Something must be taking its sweet time.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Win10 vs Fedora 28: Boot speed:

    @gjacobse said in Win10 vs Fedora 28: Boot speed:

    @scottalanmiller said in Win10 vs Fedora 28: Boot speed:

    From what I've seen, Windows 10 is the fastest. Microsoft really has high speed booting down to a science. I think they beat everyone at that. Fedora seems quite a bit faster than Ubuntu, but both are very slow compared to Windows 10 on the same hardware.

    Sadly, just a place where Windows kicks butt over any Linux that I've seen. Not the biggest deal, but certainly a place where Fedora or Ubuntu could improve.

    That is a bit frustrating considering the 'push' for getting away from MS and all of it's applications. I do know that I can improve performance some by putting in a SSD drive over the 7200RPM (SR) that's in it now. and I will at some point. Working on the priority list first.

    How does it impact you? How often are you rebooting? I boot in the morning when I start the day and just hit the power button before sitting down. It's up so fast, slow compared to Windows but still super fast, that I really don't notice. Ubuntu is slow enough that I would really notice, but not Fedora.

    While Windows is way better here, it's not a spot that actually affects me in any way.

    If you want a screaming fast Linux book, ChromeOS boots even faster than Windows. So it isn't Linux itself that's so slow, it is each individual OS and what all it loads and how it optimizes.

    I suppose it's mainly / mostly perception maybe. I don't boot often - heck I've been going days without using three of the four computers... and less and less of the main desktop. Now this coming week I am On-Call, so I have to likely VPN into the office.

    Don't get me started on the VPN process. It is a total PITA process. One that can't be done without my work phone sigh...



  • As for 'screaming fast'..

    I'm looking to replace the Samsung and iPad with at ChromeTab... just addressing other issues first.



  • Signed in and started Chrome and glances

    Had an ioWait time of 70%...

    that seems excessive.

    0:00:13) - Critical on CPU_IOWAIT (min: 24.2 Mean: 60.2 Max: 78.7): tracker-extract, chrome, tracker-store
    


  • @gjacobse said in Win10 vs Fedora 28: Boot speed:

    Signed in and started Chrome and glances

    Had an ioWait time of 70%...

    that seems excessive.

    0:00:13) - Critical on CPU_IOWAIT (min: 24.2 Mean: 60.2 Max: 78.7): tracker-extract, chrome, tracker-store
    

    Yeah, that's a lot if it lasts more than a second or two.



  • It's logical that linux is slower to boot since it supports more hardware in the kernel and has to do more checks to find out what it is running on. Could probably make it a lot faster by recompiling the kernel. There are embedded linux versions that boots extremely fast but only has what it needs in the kernel. And that goes for the rest of the services as well.

    Windows is usually not 100% ready when it starts to show the login interface. So it appears to boot faster than it actually does.

    But honestly though, I reboot my laptop maybe once a week if that. Doesn't sleep work in Fedora 28?



  • @Pete-S said in Win10 vs Fedora 28: Boot speed:

    It's logical that linux is slower to boot since it supports more hardware in the kernel and has to do more checks to find out what it is running on. Could probably make it a lot faster by recompiling the kernel. There are embedded linux versions that boots extremely fast but only has what it needs in the kernel. And that goes for the rest of the services as well.

    Windows is usually not 100% ready when it starts to show the login interface. So it appears to boot faster than it actually does.

    But honestly though, I reboot my laptop maybe once a week if that. Doesn't sleep work in Fedora 28?

    I never get completely reliable sleep on anything... Windows or Linux or MacOS. Except ChromeOS. So I never test it.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Win10 vs Fedora 28: Boot speed:

    @Pete-S said in Win10 vs Fedora 28: Boot speed:

    It's logical that linux is slower to boot since it supports more hardware in the kernel and has to do more checks to find out what it is running on. Could probably make it a lot faster by recompiling the kernel. There are embedded linux versions that boots extremely fast but only has what it needs in the kernel. And that goes for the rest of the services as well.

    Windows is usually not 100% ready when it starts to show the login interface. So it appears to boot faster than it actually does.

    But honestly though, I reboot my laptop maybe once a week if that. Doesn't sleep work in Fedora 28?

    I never get completely reliable sleep on anything... Windows or Linux or MacOS. Except ChromeOS. So I never test it.

    Windows has always been 100% for me. Well, maybe not always, but the last 10 years or so.



  • @Pete-S said in Win10 vs Fedora 28: Boot speed:

    @scottalanmiller said in Win10 vs Fedora 28: Boot speed:

    @Pete-S said in Win10 vs Fedora 28: Boot speed:

    It's logical that linux is slower to boot since it supports more hardware in the kernel and has to do more checks to find out what it is running on. Could probably make it a lot faster by recompiling the kernel. There are embedded linux versions that boots extremely fast but only has what it needs in the kernel. And that goes for the rest of the services as well.

    Windows is usually not 100% ready when it starts to show the login interface. So it appears to boot faster than it actually does.

    But honestly though, I reboot my laptop maybe once a week if that. Doesn't sleep work in Fedora 28?

    I never get completely reliable sleep on anything... Windows or Linux or MacOS. Except ChromeOS. So I never test it.

    Windows has always been 100% for me. Well, maybe not always, but the last 10 years or so.

    Ummm, not even.



  • @gjacobse said in Win10 vs Fedora 28: Boot speed:

    @scottalanmiller said in Win10 vs Fedora 28: Boot speed:

    From what I've seen, Windows 10 is the fastest. Microsoft really has high speed booting down to a science. I think they beat everyone at that. Fedora seems quite a bit faster than Ubuntu, but both are very slow compared to Windows 10 on the same hardware.

    Sadly, just a place where Windows kicks butt over any Linux that I've seen. Not the biggest deal, but certainly a place where Fedora or Ubuntu could improve.

    That is a bit frustrating considering the 'push' for getting away from MS and all of it's applications. I do know that I can improve performance some by putting in a SSD drive over the 7200RPM (SR) that's in it now. and I will at some point. Working on the priority list first.

    5 minutes??? God, is your drive failing I wonder...

    An SSD will get it down substantially. I want to say my Samsung 850 Pro boots Fedora nearly as fast as Windows 10; they are seconds apart, and that is around 5-15 seconds.

    860 Pros came out not too long ago. Here's a 512GB if you can fit it in the budget; 256GB is cheaper of course.

    https://www.amazon.com/Samsung-512GB-V-NAND-Solid-MZ-76P512BW/dp/B07836C6YV/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1541290811&sr=8-1&keywords=860+pro



  • @scottalanmiller this was actually always the case. MS ran into boot time problems a while ago, and their solution was to get into the UI as quickly as possible, while continuing to load everything in the background. This is why Windows is damn slow after you boot and slowly picks up speed as everything REALLY loads.

    The proper timing would be from getting out of POST and to being able to actually use the desktop, not to seeing the desktop.

    I remember several benchmarks being published some 10-15 years ago, showing several additional minutes of severe slowness even when your basic desktop seemed to be loaded.

    TLDR: this is an illusion or a dirty hack, depending on your preference in terminology 🙂



  • @scottalanmiller said in Win10 vs Fedora 28: Boot speed:

    @Pete-S said in Win10 vs Fedora 28: Boot speed:

    It's logical that linux is slower to boot since it supports more hardware in the kernel and has to do more checks to find out what it is running on. Could probably make it a lot faster by recompiling the kernel. There are embedded linux versions that boots extremely fast but only has what it needs in the kernel. And that goes for the rest of the services as well.

    Windows is usually not 100% ready when it starts to show the login interface. So it appears to boot faster than it actually does.

    But honestly though, I reboot my laptop maybe once a week if that. Doesn't sleep work in Fedora 28?

    I never get completely reliable sleep on anything... Windows or Linux or MacOS. Except ChromeOS. So I never test it.

    I got perfect sleep with Windows 10 and Fedora on my Latitude 7270 I think it is.



  • @Obsolesce said in Win10 vs Fedora 28: Boot speed:

    @scottalanmiller said in Win10 vs Fedora 28: Boot speed:

    @Pete-S said in Win10 vs Fedora 28: Boot speed:

    It's logical that linux is slower to boot since it supports more hardware in the kernel and has to do more checks to find out what it is running on. Could probably make it a lot faster by recompiling the kernel. There are embedded linux versions that boots extremely fast but only has what it needs in the kernel. And that goes for the rest of the services as well.

    Windows is usually not 100% ready when it starts to show the login interface. So it appears to boot faster than it actually does.

    But honestly though, I reboot my laptop maybe once a week if that. Doesn't sleep work in Fedora 28?

    I never get completely reliable sleep on anything... Windows or Linux or MacOS. Except ChromeOS. So I never test it.

    I got perfect sleep with Windows 10 and Fedora on my Latitude 7270 I think it is.

    Also, boot up is super quick on it with booth OSs.



  • @dyasny said in Win10 vs Fedora 28: Boot speed:

    @scottalanmiller this was actually always the case. MS ran into boot time problems a while ago, and their solution was to get into the UI as quickly as possible, while continuing to load everything in the background. This is why Windows is damn slow after you boot and slowly picks up speed as everything REALLY loads.

    The proper timing would be from getting out of POST and to being able to actually use the desktop, not to seeing the desktop.

    I remember several benchmarks being published some 10-15 years ago, showing several additional minutes of severe slowness even when your basic desktop seemed to be loaded.

    TLDR: this is an illusion or a dirty hack, depending on your preference in terminology 🙂

    Definitely, my Linux is usable the instant I "see" the desktop. My Windows can take forever. We have a WIndows gaming rig for the kids and we teach them to power it on and to go do other things as full boot up can take over five minutes, even on a screaming fast machine. If you try to use it before then, things don't work reliably.



  • @bbigford said in Win10 vs Fedora 28: Boot speed:

    @gjacobse said in Win10 vs Fedora 28: Boot speed:

    @scottalanmiller said in Win10 vs Fedora 28: Boot speed:

    From what I've seen, Windows 10 is the fastest. Microsoft really has high speed booting down to a science. I think they beat everyone at that. Fedora seems quite a bit faster than Ubuntu, but both are very slow compared to Windows 10 on the same hardware.

    Sadly, just a place where Windows kicks butt over any Linux that I've seen. Not the biggest deal, but certainly a place where Fedora or Ubuntu could improve.

    That is a bit frustrating considering the 'push' for getting away from MS and all of it's applications. I do know that I can improve performance some by putting in a SSD drive over the 7200RPM (SR) that's in it now. and I will at some point. Working on the priority list first.

    5 minutes??? God, is your drive failing I wonder...

    An SSD will get it down substantially. I want to say my Samsung 850 Pro boots Fedora nearly as fast as Windows 10; they are seconds apart, and that is around 5-15 seconds.

    860 Pros came out not too long ago. Here's a 512GB if you can fit it in the budget; 256GB is cheaper of course.

    https://www.amazon.com/Samsung-512GB-V-NAND-Solid-MZ-76P512BW/dp/B07836C6YV/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1541290811&sr=8-1&keywords=860+pro

    Thanks for the link. That is definitely in a good price range.



  • @gjacobse said in Win10 vs Fedora 28: Boot speed:

    @bbigford said in Win10 vs Fedora 28: Boot speed:

    @gjacobse said in Win10 vs Fedora 28: Boot speed:

    @scottalanmiller said in Win10 vs Fedora 28: Boot speed:

    From what I've seen, Windows 10 is the fastest. Microsoft really has high speed booting down to a science. I think they beat everyone at that. Fedora seems quite a bit faster than Ubuntu, but both are very slow compared to Windows 10 on the same hardware.

    Sadly, just a place where Windows kicks butt over any Linux that I've seen. Not the biggest deal, but certainly a place where Fedora or Ubuntu could improve.

    That is a bit frustrating considering the 'push' for getting away from MS and all of it's applications. I do know that I can improve performance some by putting in a SSD drive over the 7200RPM (SR) that's in it now. and I will at some point. Working on the priority list first.

    5 minutes??? God, is your drive failing I wonder...

    An SSD will get it down substantially. I want to say my Samsung 850 Pro boots Fedora nearly as fast as Windows 10; they are seconds apart, and that is around 5-15 seconds.

    860 Pros came out not too long ago. Here's a 512GB if you can fit it in the budget; 256GB is cheaper of course.

    https://www.amazon.com/Samsung-512GB-V-NAND-Solid-MZ-76P512BW/dp/B07836C6YV/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1541290811&sr=8-1&keywords=860+pro

    Thanks for the link. That is definitely in a good price range.

    Worth noting that I've used many other high end SSDs (Plextor, Intel, etc). Samsung manufacturers their own NAND, controller; everything, top to bottom. Theirs absolutely fly compared to any others I've used. For consumer use of course, not infrastructure.



  • @dyasny Yeah your right, its an illusion. Windows is not starting at a completely shut down point so it has way less to go until the desktop is usable again.



  • @jmoore said in Win10 vs Fedora 28: Boot speed:

    @dyasny Yeah your right, its an illusion. Windows is not starting at a completely shut down point so it has way less to go until the desktop is usable again.

    that's sleep mode, that's a little different.



  • @jmoore bringing linux out of sleep or suspend is also much faster



  • @scottalanmiller said in Win10 vs Fedora 28: Boot speed:

    @jmoore said in Win10 vs Fedora 28: Boot speed:

    @dyasny Yeah your right, its an illusion. Windows is not starting at a completely shut down point so it has way less to go until the desktop is usable again.

    that's sleep mode, that's a little different.

    actually - even "shutdown" has a different type of state it normally goes into making bootup much faster than normal. If you want a full shutdown in Windows 10

     shutdown /s /f /t 0
    

    or hold the shift key down while clicking shutdown from the start menu.



  • @scottalanmiller I wasn't referring to sleep mode. Windows use to have varying degrees of shutdown, I'm pretty sure it still does.