Dark Fiber



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    When the internet is faster than your HDD



  • Gigabit leased line?



  • Damn, upload is higher than the download.



  • @emad-r time to upgrade your hard drive.


  • Service Provider

    Not really dark fiber if you are using it. It's lit fiber. Dark fiber is the fiber that has no connections on it, waiting to be plugged in.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Dark Fiber:

    Not really dark fiber if you are using it. It's lit fiber. Dark fiber is the fiber that has no connections on it, waiting to be plugged in.

    You mean it's not stained glass . . .



  • @dustinb3403 said in Dark Fiber:

    @scottalanmiller said in Dark Fiber:

    Not really dark fiber if you are using it. It's lit fiber. Dark fiber is the fiber that has no connections on it, waiting to be plugged in.

    You mean it's not stained glass . . .

    😆



  • @emad-r said in Dark Fiber:

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    When the internet is faster than your HDD

    Colt in the UK?



  • @scottalanmiller said in Dark Fiber:

    Not really dark fiber if you are using it. It's lit fiber. Dark fiber is the fiber that has no connections on it, waiting to be plugged in.

    In france they call it Black Fibre, or dark as way to mean this Fiber is totally dedicated for your network like leased Fiber with no shared companies but you.


  • Service Provider

    @emad-r said in Dark Fiber:

    @scottalanmiller said in Dark Fiber:

    Not really dark fiber if you are using it. It's lit fiber. Dark fiber is the fiber that has no connections on it, waiting to be plugged in.

    In france they call it Black Fibre, or dark as way to mean this Fiber is totally dedicated for your network like leased Fiber with no shared companies but you.

    That's a misuse of the term universally. Dark would never mean that. Fiber is "lit" meaning in use (it has light on it) or dark meaning it does not have light in it, or unused (literally, no light being shone through it.) The French are misusing it the same way Americans do. It's wrong.

    Dark fiber has meant fiber that was run, but unused, for decades and is so straightforward that it is literally not a technical term, but a simple description. Like saying "empty driveway" means no cars are in it. That's not a technical trade term, just a description of the driveway. Misusing it is obvious.

    Like cloud and other things, dark fiber "sounded cool", so people starting saying it to refer to the opposite, to lit fiber. In the US, it's used for... well anything, but always wrong except when the fiber is dark. Same in France. Most people don't understand fiber, but want to sound cool, so use the term incorrectly. Because "dark fiber" sound like something awesome in Star Trek instead of what it actually is, just an unused strand of glass underground.



  • ... and blacklight isn't black! It's invisible (to human eyes).


  • Service Provider

    @scottalanmiller Dark Fiber is now a thing because people wanted to make money from actual dark fiber and thus started selling it.

    Obviously, it is no longer dark once turned up. But the sale was of "Dark Fiber"


  • Service Provider

    @jaredbusch said in Dark Fiber:

    @scottalanmiller Dark Fiber is now a thing because people wanted to make money from actual dark fiber and thus started selling it.

    Obviously, it is no longer dark once turned up. But the sale was of "Dark Fiber"

    They used to advertise it as being dark but space physical capacity should the lit fiber become saturated or damaged, that dark fiber was available to be "undarkened" in case the lit fiber couldn't do the job for whatever reason. Like unplumbed second Ethernet runs.


  • Service Provider

    @obsolesce said in Dark Fiber:

    ... and blacklight isn't black! It's invisible (to human eyes).

    You don't see black light? I do. I think most people do. It's just dim.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Dark Fiber:

    @obsolesce said in Dark Fiber:

    ... and blacklight isn't black! It's invisible (to human eyes).

    You don't see black light? I do. I think most people do. It's just dim.

    Blacklight = ultraviolet light = shorter wavelength (10-400 nm) than visible light (400 - 700 nm)


  • Service Provider

    @obsolesce said in Dark Fiber:

    @scottalanmiller said in Dark Fiber:

    @obsolesce said in Dark Fiber:

    ... and blacklight isn't black! It's invisible (to human eyes).

    You don't see black light? I do. I think most people do. It's just dim.

    Blacklight = ultraviolet light = shorter wavelength (10-400 nm) than visible light (400 - 700 nm)

    Blacklight isn't actually ultraviolet. You can't see UV, but you can see blacklight. At least everyone I know can. It's right on the edge of being UV, hence why it is a deep purple rather than invisible. But it's still visible. They just always call it UV to make it sound cooler than it is. Not that it isn't cool, but I can certainly see it. That's why lots of places light with it, even when not triggering the effect that people want, it's still enough to see by.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Dark Fiber:

    @obsolesce said in Dark Fiber:

    @scottalanmiller said in Dark Fiber:

    @obsolesce said in Dark Fiber:

    ... and blacklight isn't black! It's invisible (to human eyes).

    You don't see black light? I do. I think most people do. It's just dim.

    Blacklight = ultraviolet light = shorter wavelength (10-400 nm) than visible light (400 - 700 nm)

    Blacklight isn't actually ultraviolet. You can't see UV, but you can see blacklight. At least everyone I know can. It's right on the edge of being UV, hence why it is a deep purple rather than invisible. But it's still visible. They just always call it UV to make it sound cooler than it is. Not that it isn't cool, but I can certainly see it. That's why lots of places light with it, even when not triggering the effect that people want, it's still enough to see by.

    The violet glow of a black light is not the UV light itself, but visible light that escapes being filtered out by the filter material in the glass envelope.

    It depends on what you refer to as "black light".

    If you define a blacklight to be the device itself that emits UV light, then yes, you are seeing the visible light that escapes as mentioned above.

    And FFS, to finally readdress my original point, the light isn't black.