Help with my first Hyper-V setup



  • Our setup: public library system- 5 staff at HQ-currently using WinServer 2088R2 with AD
    Primary use is file storage
    We have purchased new hardware and Windows Server 2016 licenses and CALs
    new hardware: dell T330, 16 GB ram, 2 TB hard drive, Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1220 v5 @ 3.00GH
    Hyper- V server 2016 installed, 5nine manager installed ,Altaro backup installed
    Hyper-V manager connecting remotely from Win10Pro desktop
    Windows Admin Center connecting remotely from Win10Pro desktop
    2 VMS running Windows Server 2016 not activated yet or in use. I can blow this away and rebuild if necessary
    My starter questions:
    RAm allocation. For instance if each VM got 6B does that leave 4 for the hypervisor? Is there any good rule of thumb?
    Hard drive. I have 30GB on C:\ where the Hypervisor OS is installed and most of the rest on F:\ where the virtual disks for the VMs are. Is the 30 too small, too large, about right for Hyper-V OS?
    Do checkpoints recover all files or just OS files (kind of like System Restore in desktops)?
    I welcome any feedback I am just starting in Virtualization. More questions to follow.Some days my replies will be slow.



  • @LJ when you install the drivers into the VM's the hypervisor will be able to manage the RAM allocated to each VM. This way you can over-allocate (to a reasonable degree) and be pretty safe and not have to worry about not allowing enough RAM for Dom0.



  • @dustinb3403 Thanks. Dom0 is the Host, right?



  • Microsoft's documentation states "plan for at least 4 GB of RAM. More memory is better. You'll need enough memory for the host and all virtual machines that you want to run at the same time."

    So even providing less should be fine.



  • @lj said in Help with my first Hyper-V setup:

    @dustinb3403 Thanks. Dom0 is the hypervisor, right?

    Correct, I assume you installed Hyper-V to the hardware, and not Server 2016 and then enabled the Hyper-V role. (seems like you got the setup correct).



  • @dustinb3403 Yes, Microsoft Hyper-v Server 2016, not Windows server



  • @lj said in Help with my first Hyper-V setup:

    @dustinb3403 Yes, Microsoft Hyper-v Server 2016, not Windows server

    So yeah, you should be fine the way you've set things up, you're administering the server from Windows 10 (expected). Having only a single disk for your VM's to reside on isn't ideal, but if it's all you can afford then just make sure you have a solid backup plan.

    Disks do fail often enough (which is a key benefit to using RAID) protection from bad disks.

    As for the space allocation between the hypervisor and your VM storage, honestly, I'd just read the system requirements from microsoft.

    Any backup that stays on the host (thus isn't properly detatched) isn't a backup. If you need a free backup, use UrBackupPC and setup a tiny Ubuntu Server VM to run it and use remote storage to save your backups to.



  • @dustinb3403 said in Help with my first Hyper-V setup:

    @LJ when you install the drivers into the VM's the hypervisor will be able to manage the RAM allocated to each VM. This way you can over-allocate (to a reasonable degree) and be pretty safe and not have to worry about not allowing enough RAM for Dom0.

    If using Hyper-V and your VM is running modern Windows Server, you don't need to install any virtualization drivers.



  • @dustinb3403 I'm not familiar with UrBackupPC. I'll read about it. We should be getting way faster broadband in the next year and by then I hope to have the old server with Hyper-V installed and have it in a branch that has a locked room available. My current thoughts are to install a Guest OS there and have a scheduled backup of some kind from the new server to the remote one. I have a Dell Rd1000 removable HD built in the new server and Altaro seems to use it ok.



  • @lj said in Help with my first Hyper-V setup:

    RAm allocation. For instance if each VM got 6B does that leave 4 for the hypervisor? Is there any good rule of thumb?

    You can and should use dynamic memory unless you have a scenario where it's better to not... but you'd know it if you did.

    You can set the ram (startup memory) for both virtual machines to 4 GB, then let the minimum be 512, and the max be 6 GB like pictured below, (but the numbers I mentioned above):

    0_1529009481743_d7a21c6e-12a3-4763-a2e7-0d37c22d9990-image.png



  • @obsolesce said in Help with my first Hyper-V setup:

    @dustinb3403 said in Help with my first Hyper-V setup:

    @LJ when you install the drivers into the VM's the hypervisor will be able to manage the RAM allocated to each VM. This way you can over-allocate (to a reasonable degree) and be pretty safe and not have to worry about not allowing enough RAM for Dom0.

    If using Hyper-V and your VM is running modern Windows Server, you don't need to install any virtualization drivers.

    That's good to know, but would you honestly skip the drivers?

    They exist for a reason. .



  • @lj said in Help with my first Hyper-V setup:

    I have 30GB on C:\ where the Hypervisor OS is installed and most of the rest on F:\ where the virtual disks for the VMs are. Is the 30 too small, too large, about right for Hyper-V OS?

    If you have room, I'd set that a little larger. To allow for updates, or whatever.

    On recommendations here at ML I have been using 80GB as my go-to, but that isn't set in stone.



  • @brrabill Thanks. I haven't got there yet but I assume there is a way to change the size of all the drives without starting over.



  • @dustinb3403 said in Help with my first Hyper-V setup:

    @obsolesce said in Help with my first Hyper-V setup:

    @dustinb3403 said in Help with my first Hyper-V setup:

    @LJ when you install the drivers into the VM's the hypervisor will be able to manage the RAM allocated to each VM. This way you can over-allocate (to a reasonable degree) and be pretty safe and not have to worry about not allowing enough RAM for Dom0.

    If using Hyper-V and your VM is running modern Windows Server, you don't need to install any virtualization drivers.

    That's good to know, but would you honestly skip the drivers?

    They exist for a reason. .

    See this link, there is absolutely nothing you need to do inside a modern Windows VM:

    https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/virtualization/hyper-v/manage/manage-hyper-v-integration-services#keep-integration-services-up-to-date



  • @dustinb3403 Any reason you would prefer UrBackup over Altaro Free or Veeam free?



  • @lj said in Help with my first Hyper-V setup:

    Do checkpoints recover all files or just OS files (kind of like System Restore in desktops)?

    Checkpoints are snapshots of virtual machines. They are point-in-time snapshots of the VM and the VM's settings.

    Useful for making a configuration change or installing an update (in the VM). If something fails, you restore the snapshot. Checkpoints should not linger around for more than a day or two. Use backups for backups.



  • @obsolesce Makes sense. Thanks.



  • I use Altaro VM Backup (Free Edition) and works great. Free edition allows up to 2 VM which you are currently using anyway. If you will need more, the standard is $515 per host for up to 5 VMs.
    https://www.altaro.com/vm-backup/pricing.php



  • @black3dynamite I like it so far. I can't remember why I tried it instead of Veeam but to seems to work fine. I haven't tried a restore from it yet.



  • @lj said in Help with my first Hyper-V setup:

    @dustinb3403 Any reason you would prefer UrBackup over Altaro Free or Veeam free?

    A bit more flexibility with open source software compared to free but closed source software is all.



  • @dustinb3403 said in Help with my first Hyper-V setup:

    @LJ when you install the drivers into the VM's the hypervisor will be able to manage the RAM allocated to each VM. This way you can over-allocate (to a reasonable degree) and be pretty safe and not have to worry about not allowing enough RAM for Dom0.

    Dude, don't make statements like this if you're not sure of what you are talking about!



  • @black3dynamite said in Help with my first Hyper-V setup:

    I use Altaro VM Backup (Free Edition) and works great. Free edition allows up to 2 VM which you are currently using anyway. If you will need more, the standard is $515 per host for up to 5 VMs.
    https://www.altaro.com/vm-backup/pricing.php

    Does that include file-level restore?

    And what do you do to get the backups offsite?



  • @brrabill said in Help with my first Hyper-V setup:

    @black3dynamite said in Help with my first Hyper-V setup:

    I use Altaro VM Backup (Free Edition) and works great. Free edition allows up to 2 VM which you are currently using anyway. If you will need more, the standard is $515 per host for up to 5 VMs.
    https://www.altaro.com/vm-backup/pricing.php

    Does that include file-level restore?

    And what do you do to get the backups offsite?

    File-level restore is only available with Standard, Unlimited and Unlimited Plus.

    You have a couple of options to have backups offsite.
    Local backups can be copied to an Altaro Offsite Server over a WAN/Internet Connection. Or local backups can be copied to one or more rotating drives.



  • Thanks for everyone for everything I've learned so far. Here is my next problem. I decided to expand my volume the Hyper-V OS is on. I was able to use Diskpart to shrink the other volume but was unable to extend the OS volume. They must not be adjacent but without Disk Management I don't have a visual. I tried booting Gparted and Partition Wizard mini tool. Neither would boot. They may be a few years old. How can I extend the volume?



  • @lj said in Help with my first Hyper-V setup:

    Thanks for everyone for everything I've learned so far. Here is my next problem. I decided to expand my volume the Hyper-V OS is on. I was able to use Diskpart to shrink the other volume but was unable to extend the OS volume. They must not be adjacent but without Disk Management I don't have a visual. I tried booting Gparted and Partition Wizard mini tool. Neither would boot. They may be a few years old. How can I extend the volume?

    You can use disk management remotely.

    Open up compmgmt.msc on Win10 computer, then right-click to connect to another computer. Connect to your Hyper-V host, then under Storage, select Disk Management.

    But yeah, if they aren't adjacent, you won't be able to extend, but you may be able to span or whatever if you convert it to a Dynamic disk... but if you dont' have any production VMs going, I'd start over.

    Make your 😄 partition like 65-85 GB, and for 😨 partition, use the rest of it for VM storage.



  • @obsolesce That is the one thing I haven't been able to get working. computer management will allow some of the functions like users and groups but the disk management won't work and I've tried a lot of googled solutions. Most of them are Powershell commands to run on both machines. None of them have worked.
    Starting over may be good experience anyway. I will backup my VMs with Altaro and also with Hyper-V manager if I figure out how. If I lose the VMs I still wouldn't be in too bad a shape.



  • @lj The message when attempting Disk Management is "You do not have access rights to Logical Disk Manager on...



  • @lj said in Help with my first Hyper-V setup:

    @lj The message when attempting Disk Management is "You do not have access rights to Logical Disk Manager on...

    Is your Win10 computer and Hyper-v host joined to a MS AD domain?



  • @obsolesce The Win10 is and the HyperV host is not.



  • There's things you need to do like allow remote access to the Plug and Play interface, open up some firewall rules, allow remote server management through WinRM, automatic startup of Plug and Play service and Windows Remote Management (WS-Management) service, etc.