Anonymizing IPs for Business



  • In my ever-growing list of why I am almost an MSP, I have yet another thing to add.

    The company I work for is more like several individual brands/legal companies. We have wholesalers and now retailers. For some projects that are coming up, we need to have certain individuals with the ability to use different public IPs when connecting to the same vendor sites with different login credentials; thus, appearing as though they work at a different location. It doesn't need to be the same IP address for each of them; it just can't be the same static public IP we are using for this location.

    The brief background is that certain vendors will think that we are a single company when the traffic comes from a single IP address and will have issues with that. Since it isn't a single company, we need to have different IPs for different accounts at the same vendor.

    I have briefly toyed with different scenarios and the most expensive one is to have a few RDS servers with different public IP addresses on AWS (or other), where each server would represent each company that needs a different IP address. That seems cumbersome and might be expensive.

    I also came across this service-
    https://proxymesh.com/features/

    It rotates through different IP addresses. The downside is that it would be managed at the user level for (most-likely) another 3rd-party browser plugin and would only be useful for one login to a vendor at a time, per browser.

    Does anyone have any suggestions?


  • Service Provider

    @wrx7m said in Anonymizing IPs for Business:

    In my ever-growing list of why I am almost an MSP, I have yet another thing to add.

    It's true...

    http://www.smbitjournal.com/2017/03/all-it-is-external/



  • Why can't you just use a VPN service?



  • Do you know for certain that the vendors in question will have an issue? I don't know of many vendors that tie user accounts to IP addresses for the purpose of cross referencing.



  • OpenVPN type service through VULTR small linux instances comes to mind



  • @kelly said in Anonymizing IPs for Business:

    Do you know for certain that the vendors in question will have an issue? I don't know of many vendors that tie user accounts to IP addresses for the purpose of cross referencing.

    I am being told that they use IP addresses and other metrics.


  • Service Provider

    @wrx7m said in Anonymizing IPs for Business:

    @kelly said in Anonymizing IPs for Business:

    Do you know for certain that the vendors in question will have an issue? I don't know of many vendors that tie user accounts to IP addresses for the purpose of cross referencing.

    I am being told that they use IP addresses and other metrics.

    So when your employee and another employee both go work from the same Starbucks it will screw that totally up.

    Totally unrelated to your companies multiple legal divisions.

    Also home IP addresses can change frequently, depending on the ISP. So one day Bob at your place has an IP and the next day Jill at XYZ has it.



  • @jaredbusch said in Anonymizing IPs for Business:

    @wrx7m said in Anonymizing IPs for Business:

    @kelly said in Anonymizing IPs for Business:

    Do you know for certain that the vendors in question will have an issue? I don't know of many vendors that tie user accounts to IP addresses for the purpose of cross referencing.

    I am being told that they use IP addresses and other metrics.

    So when your employee and another employee both go work from the same Starbucks it will screw that totally up.

    Totally unrelated to your companies multiple legal divisions.

    Also home IP addresses can change frequently, depending on the ISP. So one day Bob at your place has an IP and the next day Jill at XYZ has it.

    Depending on where you are at in the decision chain for your organization I would consider pushing back on this. It is an difficult task that is not without significant cost, and will frequently fail (people being what they are). If your vendor is requiring this, then they need to have controls on their end for handling it.


  • Service Provider

    @wrx7m said in Anonymizing IPs for Business:

    The brief background is that certain vendors will think that we are a single company when the traffic comes from a single IP address and will have issues with that. Since it isn't a single company, we need to have different IPs for different accounts at the same vendor.

    Bottom line, this isn't your problem, this is a vendor problem. Their stuff is broken, period. This isn't how networking works, period. This is a bug, call support, get your money back, find something that works.



  • This isn't a "requirement" from the partner. It's one of the metrics that they use to prevent the same company from having multiple accounts.


  • Service Provider

    @wrx7m said in Anonymizing IPs for Business:

    This isn't a "requirement" from the partner. It's one of the metrics that they use to prevent the same company from having multiple accounts.

    So either...

    1. They ignore this and it doesn't matter. Or...
    2. Their software is broken because they are getting false information.


  • How do networks in shared office spaces work? Could you claim the companies all operate in a shared environment and tell the vendor to get over it? Tax ID and account setup should be the metric per company, not IP address.


  • Service Provider

    @smitherick said in Anonymizing IPs for Business:

    How do networks in shared office spaces work? Could you claim the companies all operate in a shared environment and tell the vendor to get over it? Tax ID and account setup should be the metric per company, not IP address.

    Yes, all these companies that run form shared office spaces like the one @Bundy-Associates are members of. There are a dozen companies in there or more. They all use hosted services and it all goes out the same pipe.


  • Service Provider

    @jaredbusch said in Anonymizing IPs for Business:

    @smitherick said in Anonymizing IPs for Business:

    How do networks in shared office spaces work? Could you claim the companies all operate in a shared environment and tell the vendor to get over it? Tax ID and account setup should be the metric per company, not IP address.

    Yes, all these companies that run form shared office spaces like the one @Bundy-Associates are members of. There are a dozen companies in there or more. They all use hosted services and it all goes out the same pipe.

    And lots of companies use dynamic rather than static IPs these days. Only need static if hosting services internally, which is less and less common. We don't have any static IPs here.



  • When is this vendor from the late 70's? Have the never heard of the internet before? Do they not know how/where modern people work and are requiring ridiculous things because they are incompetent?

    The application is broken push back and say if they can't fix it we need to find a vendor.



  • Update -

    I explained the points made here to the person who requested I investigate this. They have backed off for now. Hopefully, it is the end of this request.