Statistical Process Control



  • I have been in training all week with Dr. Don Wheeler learning how to use Statistical process control to quantify quality control metrics. It was a great exercise in logical decision making and process control. Just curious if anyone on here has ever heard of it or any use cases in the IT world.



  • @s-hackleman said in Statistical Process Control:

    Statistical process control to quantify quality control metrics

    I went to university for that kind of stuff. Doesn't apply to IT in any way. It's for repeatable processes like manufacturing. It undermines design activities like IT where things are not repeatable.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Statistical Process Control:

    @s-hackleman said in Statistical Process Control:

    Statistical process control to quantify quality control metrics

    I went to university for that kind of stuff. Doesn't apply to IT in any way. It's for repeatable processes like manufacturing. It undermines design activities like IT where things are not repeatable.

    That is exactly why I am learning it, as we are developing software for manufacturing. I just finished the class and was just kind of thinking out loud what use cases could exist in my other skills.



  • @s-hackleman said in Statistical Process Control:

    @scottalanmiller said in Statistical Process Control:

    @s-hackleman said in Statistical Process Control:

    Statistical process control to quantify quality control metrics

    I went to university for that kind of stuff. Doesn't apply to IT in any way. It's for repeatable processes like manufacturing. It undermines design activities like IT where things are not repeatable.

    That is exactly why I am learning it, as we are developing software for manufacturing. I just finished the class and was just kind of thinking out loud what use cases could exist in my other skills.

    One of the best things to take away from those kinds of classes is a stronger understanding of how it doesn't apply. LOL Which sounds funny to say. But digging into "why does it feel like it should apply, yet doesn't" does a lot for learning about IT.



  • In an example scenario....

    a factor will do simple design up front and make repeatable parts for months or years. The parts don't change. You have processes to tune and improve to make maybe the parts easier and easier or cheaper over time.

    IT is not like that. But how and why?

    IT designs new things all the time, and if building something normally does it once. If something can be repeated, it should leave IT and be handed to bench or some other department. Or automated. IT really doesn't do repeatable processes. Each IT task is unique, being done for the first time. New decisions, new fixes, new designs. No repetition.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Statistical Process Control:

    In an example scenario....

    a factor will do simple design up front and make repeatable parts for months or years. The parts don't change. You have processes to tune and improve to make maybe the parts easier and easier or cheaper over time.

    IT is not like that. But how and why?

    IT designs new things all the time, and if building something normally does it once. If something can be repeated, it should leave IT and be handed to bench or some other department. Or automated. IT really doesn't do repeatable processes. Each IT task is unique, being done for the first time. New decisions, new fixes, new designs. No repetition.

    Thanks SAM you have given our department conversation material for the beers.



  • If you want a sliding scale example....

    Factory: Tiny design (1%) with loads of repeatable manufacturing (99%)
    Bridge: Big design early (50%) with a fair amount of building process (50%)
    IT: All design (99%) with a tiny moment of one time implementation (1%)


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