VMware on Azure?



  • There's a ton of goodness in this article, but my favorite part was that they are developing a way to run VMware bare metal in Azure similar to VMware on AWS.

    https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/blog/transforming-your-vmware-environment-with-microsoft-azure/



  • Kind of interesting in concept. Charges has to be outrageous though because one would be paying for both Azure and VMware licenses at the same time. Suppose Azure annually would be comparable to physical hardware on-prem throughout its lifetime.

    Recently I discovered that I can restore a VM from Veeam on a VMware workload to Azure. I thought that was a twist.



  • Just what we wanted, a lower quality way to run VMware.



  • @scottalanmiller said in VMware on Azure?:

    Just what we wanted, a lower quality way to run VMware.

    We can still rely on people not speccing out the hardware they use to run VMware correctly. 🙂



  • @networknerd said in VMware on Azure?:

    @scottalanmiller said in VMware on Azure?:

    Just what we wanted, a lower quality way to run VMware.

    We can still rely on people not speccing out the hardware they use to run VMware correctly. 🙂

    Yeah, but we had AWS. Azure is just crap.



  • @scottalanmiller said in VMware on Azure?:

    @networknerd said in VMware on Azure?:

    @scottalanmiller said in VMware on Azure?:

    Just what we wanted, a lower quality way to run VMware.

    We can still rely on people not speccing out the hardware they use to run VMware correctly. 🙂

    Yeah, but we had AWS. Azure is just crap.

    I've never used Azure to run VMs - only for AD Connect with O365. I've never used AWS to run VMs for that matter either. I've used GCE to spin up a VM as well as Rackspace for some others, but that's it.



  • @networknerd said in VMware on Azure?:

    @scottalanmiller said in VMware on Azure?:

    @networknerd said in VMware on Azure?:

    @scottalanmiller said in VMware on Azure?:

    Just what we wanted, a lower quality way to run VMware.

    We can still rely on people not speccing out the hardware they use to run VMware correctly. 🙂

    Yeah, but we had AWS. Azure is just crap.

    I've never used Azure to run VMs - only for AD Connect with O365. I've never used AWS to run VMs for that matter either. I've used GCE to spin up a VM as well as Rackspace for some others, but that's it.

    Azure is the worst of the big names, but a wide margin.


  • Vendor

    @nerdydad said in VMware on Azure?:

    Kind of interesting in concept. Charges has to be outrageous though because one would be paying for both Azure and VMware licenses at the same time. Suppose Azure annually would be comparable to physical hardware on-prem throughout its lifetime.

    Recently I discovered that I can restore a VM from Veeam on a VMware workload to Azure. I thought that was a twist.

    The issue with doing a restore like that is it's typically a one way trip as...

    1. Transit costs OUT of azure suck.
    2. You would have to switch to doing agent-based backups to get data out.

    In the case of this announcement, it's unilateral (With VMware saying they were not consulted). Considering VMware licensing for hosting providers is a special program and Microsoft is not in it this leads to speculation that...

    1. Are they trying to get another partner to deploy/manage it? This would likely breach the EULA on the hosting program as it prevented co-marketing/white label stuff like this the last time I read it.

    2. Microsoft thinks it can offer vSphere as a service without joining the VMware Cloud Provider Program (This will likely be met with legal).

    3. Azure is known to run on custom hardware servers. Unless they've got DL380's or something certified this will not be supported.

    ![alt text](0_1511459190095_Screenshot 2017-11-23 23.16.06.jpg image url)



  • In the case of this announcement, it's unilateral (With VMware saying they were not consulted). Considering VMware licensing for hosting providers is a special program and Microsoft is not in it this leads to speculation that...

    Yikes - I definitely missed that part of the announcement.



  • @storageninja said in VMware on Azure?:

    @nerdydad said in VMware on Azure?:

    Kind of interesting in concept. Charges has to be outrageous though because one would be paying for both Azure and VMware licenses at the same time. Suppose Azure annually would be comparable to physical hardware on-prem throughout its lifetime.

    Recently I discovered that I can restore a VM from Veeam on a VMware workload to Azure. I thought that was a twist.

    The issue with doing a restore like that is it's typically a one way trip as...

    1. Transit costs OUT of azure suck.
    2. You would have to switch to doing agent-based backups to get data out.

    In the case of this announcement, it's unilateral (With VMware saying they were not consulted). Considering VMware licensing for hosting providers is a special program and Microsoft is not in it this leads to speculation that...

    1. Are they trying to get another partner to deploy/manage it? This would likely breach the EULA on the hosting program as it prevented co-marketing/white label stuff like this the last time I read it.

    2. Microsoft thinks it can offer vSphere as a service without joining the VMware Cloud Provider Program (This will likely be met with legal).

    3. Azure is known to run on custom hardware servers. Unless they've got DL380's or something certified this will not be supported.

    ![alt text](0_1511459190095_Screenshot 2017-11-23 23.16.06.jpg image url)

    Wow, just wow.