Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company



  • I am considering leaving an enterprise company for approximately a 20% increase in pay. The company inviting me is smaller 51-250 employee company. They offer a unique platform that customers can buy and use on their own or the company can manage the platform and track data for the customer.

    I am interested in hearing pros and cons from going to a smaller company like this vs being in the enterprise space. Is there anything I need to watch out for?



  • I'd also like to add that I don't have an offer as of yet. I did a phone interview on Friday and it went really well. I told them my expected range and it's a 20-30% increase, and they were fine with it.

    If I get an in-person interview, what type of questions should I ask to gauge company health and size?


  • Service Provider

    There are a lot of variables. For example, small company/large company, your immediate supervisor can make your life miserable... Also how do you not know if they are closer to 50 employees or 250? At 50 it's not likely you would have any help, and might even have to do more than just IT. At 250, you could still be on your own, or have a couple people helping. All that stuff makes a difference.


  • Service Provider

    As Mike says... TONS of variables, size being only one of them. Small companies are inherently much more risky. It means that they don't have buffer to handle things like pay or changes. At 250 you are still in a range where one tiny change in funding, product, environment, or whatever and they can go out of business overnight or be unable to make payroll. Enterprises essentially never have this issue.



  • Find out about benefits - this can be huge. In a smaller company you might have to pay a significant amount of your healthcare.

    Don't forget about vacation, plus if you'll be oncall while on vacation, etc.


  • Service Provider

    As the others have stated, 50 to 250 is a huge swing in the SMB.

    There are a ton of risk factors involved.

    It is nice that the company has a specific vertical that they are able to service, but how long have they been doing it.

    How is the software actually written? How is it served? How is it kept up to date visually? How is it kept up to date technically?

    You might not be a developer, but you need to know these types of things when you go work for a software company. These are the things that will keep the company in business or drive them to their competition (or spawn new competition).


  • Service Provider

    Epicorp makes a product called Profit 21. It has a good size market deployment both on site and hosted by Epicorp.

    But it is a legacy design LoB app. It is clunky to use and expensive to license simply because it requires all Microsoft licensing. Server, RDS CALs, User CALs, SQL Server, SQL CALs.


  • Service Provider

    @jaredbusch said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    Epicorp makes a product called Profit 21. It has a good size market deployment both on site and hosted by Epicorp.

    But it is a legacy design LoB app. It is clunky to use and expensive to license simply because it requires all Microsoft licensing. Server, RDS CALs, User CALs, SQL Server, SQL CALs.

    And makes even them, at a decent size, a huge risk if that was their only product. Because a competitor could come along, recreate something for their market using modern tools and methods, charge more and still be chaper by not making half of the cost go to a third party!



  • @jaredbusch said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    As the others have stated, 50 to 250 is a huge swing in the SMB.

    There are a ton of risk factors involved.

    It is nice that the company has a specific vertical that they are able to service, but how long have they been doing it.

    How is the software actually written? How is it served? How is it kept up to date visually? How is it kept up to date technically?

    You might not be a developer, but you need to know these types of things when you go work for a software company. These are the things that will keep the company in business or drive them to their competition (or spawn new competition).

    Great points right here. Last position I was at was considerably outdated and weren't getting up to date very quickly. Due to this they were gradually losing clients to competitors. Being that they had literally the one product when I left they were in a scramble to get up to date. Being aware of how development is going, languages being used, approaches to other tech will help you get a grasp on what you are getting yourself into. There's a difference between getting paid 20% more to join a team or paid 20% more to save a company from going under.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    @jaredbusch said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    Epicorp makes a product called Profit 21. It has a good size market deployment both on site and hosted by Epicorp.

    But it is a legacy design LoB app. It is clunky to use and expensive to license simply because it requires all Microsoft licensing. Server, RDS CALs, User CALs, SQL Server, SQL CALs.

    And makes even them, at a decent size, a huge risk if that was their only product. Because a competitor could come along, recreate something for their market using modern tools and methods, charge more and still be chaper by not making half of the cost go to a third party!

    Yeah, that is my concern is that the company is a one trick pony. It seems like it's probably not a good idea to jump ship for something like this?

    I guess these companies come and go pretty often. I'm not sure on exact company size. I'm looking at their LinkedIn and basing it off that.

    I guess I should probably still interview for practice and see what the company looks like.



  • @jaredbusch said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    Epicorp makes a product called Profit 21. It has a good size market deployment both on site and hosted by Epicorp.

    But it is a legacy design LoB app. It is clunky to use and expensive to license simply because it requires all Microsoft licensing. Server, RDS CALs, User CALs, SQL Server, SQL CALs.

    Yes, still running on Tiles Company I supported in NJ. the License is massive. Epicor is very expensive.



  • I am afraid that I'll be asked to do sales in a company that size as well. Something I would never like to do.



  • @jaredbusch said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    As the others have stated, 50 to 250 is a huge swing in the SMB.

    There are a ton of risk factors involved.

    It is nice that the company has a specific vertical that they are able to service, but how long have they been doing it.

    How is the software actually written? How is it served? How is it kept up to date visually? How is it kept up to date technically?

    You might not be a developer, but you need to know these types of things when you go work for a software company. These are the things that will keep the company in business or drive them to their competition (or spawn new competition).

    I've never heard of this company before they reached out to me. The provide a product that has competitors out there, but it's still relatively new and the competition is small right now.



  • If anyone is interested in seeing their website, send me a PM and I will show you.


  • Service Provider

    @randyblevins said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    @scottalanmiller said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    @jaredbusch said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    Epicorp makes a product called Profit 21. It has a good size market deployment both on site and hosted by Epicorp.

    But it is a legacy design LoB app. It is clunky to use and expensive to license simply because it requires all Microsoft licensing. Server, RDS CALs, User CALs, SQL Server, SQL CALs.

    And makes even them, at a decent size, a huge risk if that was their only product. Because a competitor could come along, recreate something for their market using modern tools and methods, charge more and still be chaper by not making half of the cost go to a third party!

    Yeah, that is my concern is that the company is a one trick pony. It seems like it's probably not a good idea to jump ship for something like this?

    I guess these companies come and go pretty often. I'm not sure on exact company size. I'm looking at their LinkedIn and basing it off that.

    I guess I should probably still interview for practice and see what the company looks like.

    It can be, you just have to be really careful and make sure that it fits your life goals. SMBs come and go every day. They have no longevity.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    @randyblevins said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    @scottalanmiller said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    @jaredbusch said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    Epicorp makes a product called Profit 21. It has a good size market deployment both on site and hosted by Epicorp.

    But it is a legacy design LoB app. It is clunky to use and expensive to license simply because it requires all Microsoft licensing. Server, RDS CALs, User CALs, SQL Server, SQL CALs.

    And makes even them, at a decent size, a huge risk if that was their only product. Because a competitor could come along, recreate something for their market using modern tools and methods, charge more and still be chaper by not making half of the cost go to a third party!

    Yeah, that is my concern is that the company is a one trick pony. It seems like it's probably not a good idea to jump ship for something like this?

    I guess these companies come and go pretty often. I'm not sure on exact company size. I'm looking at their LinkedIn and basing it off that.

    I guess I should probably still interview for practice and see what the company looks like.

    It can be, you just have to be really careful and make sure that it fits your life goals. SMBs come and go every day. They have no longevity.

    What questions would you ask in the interview about the company?


  • Service Provider

    @randyblevins said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    @scottalanmiller said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    @randyblevins said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    @scottalanmiller said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    @jaredbusch said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    Epicorp makes a product called Profit 21. It has a good size market deployment both on site and hosted by Epicorp.

    But it is a legacy design LoB app. It is clunky to use and expensive to license simply because it requires all Microsoft licensing. Server, RDS CALs, User CALs, SQL Server, SQL CALs.

    And makes even them, at a decent size, a huge risk if that was their only product. Because a competitor could come along, recreate something for their market using modern tools and methods, charge more and still be chaper by not making half of the cost go to a third party!

    Yeah, that is my concern is that the company is a one trick pony. It seems like it's probably not a good idea to jump ship for something like this?

    I guess these companies come and go pretty often. I'm not sure on exact company size. I'm looking at their LinkedIn and basing it off that.

    I guess I should probably still interview for practice and see what the company looks like.

    It can be, you just have to be really careful and make sure that it fits your life goals. SMBs come and go every day. They have no longevity.

    What questions would you ask in the interview about the company?

    That's tough because companies lie continuously in these things. They'll say anything to make themselves sound good. But ask about the processes used, technologies used, ask them to explain some of their decision processes, ask about what makes them competitive both in tech and in operations, really grill them on their business model, funding, history, ownership, future goals, etc.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    @randyblevins said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    @scottalanmiller said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    @randyblevins said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    @scottalanmiller said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    @jaredbusch said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    Epicorp makes a product called Profit 21. It has a good size market deployment both on site and hosted by Epicorp.

    But it is a legacy design LoB app. It is clunky to use and expensive to license simply because it requires all Microsoft licensing. Server, RDS CALs, User CALs, SQL Server, SQL CALs.

    And makes even them, at a decent size, a huge risk if that was their only product. Because a competitor could come along, recreate something for their market using modern tools and methods, charge more and still be chaper by not making half of the cost go to a third party!

    Yeah, that is my concern is that the company is a one trick pony. It seems like it's probably not a good idea to jump ship for something like this?

    I guess these companies come and go pretty often. I'm not sure on exact company size. I'm looking at their LinkedIn and basing it off that.

    I guess I should probably still interview for practice and see what the company looks like.

    It can be, you just have to be really careful and make sure that it fits your life goals. SMBs come and go every day. They have no longevity.

    What questions would you ask in the interview about the company?

    That's tough because companies lie continuously in these things. They'll say anything to make themselves sound good. But ask about the processes used, technologies used, ask them to explain some of their decision processes, ask about what makes them competitive both in tech and in operations, really grill them on their business model, funding, history, ownership, future goals, etc.

    So generally speaking 20% increase in salary actually isn't much considering the risk? A company that size would likely have to offer 50% higher than industry standard to get good people based on risk of the company size?


  • Service Provider

    @randyblevins said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    @scottalanmiller said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    @randyblevins said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    @scottalanmiller said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    @randyblevins said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    @scottalanmiller said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    @jaredbusch said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    Epicorp makes a product called Profit 21. It has a good size market deployment both on site and hosted by Epicorp.

    But it is a legacy design LoB app. It is clunky to use and expensive to license simply because it requires all Microsoft licensing. Server, RDS CALs, User CALs, SQL Server, SQL CALs.

    And makes even them, at a decent size, a huge risk if that was their only product. Because a competitor could come along, recreate something for their market using modern tools and methods, charge more and still be chaper by not making half of the cost go to a third party!

    Yeah, that is my concern is that the company is a one trick pony. It seems like it's probably not a good idea to jump ship for something like this?

    I guess these companies come and go pretty often. I'm not sure on exact company size. I'm looking at their LinkedIn and basing it off that.

    I guess I should probably still interview for practice and see what the company looks like.

    It can be, you just have to be really careful and make sure that it fits your life goals. SMBs come and go every day. They have no longevity.

    What questions would you ask in the interview about the company?

    That's tough because companies lie continuously in these things. They'll say anything to make themselves sound good. But ask about the processes used, technologies used, ask them to explain some of their decision processes, ask about what makes them competitive both in tech and in operations, really grill them on their business model, funding, history, ownership, future goals, etc.

    So generally speaking 20% increase in salary actually isn't much considering the risk? A company that size would likely have to offer 50% higher than industry standard to get good people based on risk of the company size?

    Exactly. We don't know much about them so can't speak to this one. But Cali startups, for example, often pay $300K for skills you could get for $200K in NYC if you were a bank. Stability, long term viability, low stress, big teams, big benefits... they are worth a lot.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    @randyblevins said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    @scottalanmiller said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    @randyblevins said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    @scottalanmiller said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    @randyblevins said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    @scottalanmiller said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    @jaredbusch said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    Epicorp makes a product called Profit 21. It has a good size market deployment both on site and hosted by Epicorp.

    But it is a legacy design LoB app. It is clunky to use and expensive to license simply because it requires all Microsoft licensing. Server, RDS CALs, User CALs, SQL Server, SQL CALs.

    And makes even them, at a decent size, a huge risk if that was their only product. Because a competitor could come along, recreate something for their market using modern tools and methods, charge more and still be chaper by not making half of the cost go to a third party!

    Yeah, that is my concern is that the company is a one trick pony. It seems like it's probably not a good idea to jump ship for something like this?

    I guess these companies come and go pretty often. I'm not sure on exact company size. I'm looking at their LinkedIn and basing it off that.

    I guess I should probably still interview for practice and see what the company looks like.

    It can be, you just have to be really careful and make sure that it fits your life goals. SMBs come and go every day. They have no longevity.

    What questions would you ask in the interview about the company?

    That's tough because companies lie continuously in these things. They'll say anything to make themselves sound good. But ask about the processes used, technologies used, ask them to explain some of their decision processes, ask about what makes them competitive both in tech and in operations, really grill them on their business model, funding, history, ownership, future goals, etc.

    So generally speaking 20% increase in salary actually isn't much considering the risk? A company that size would likely have to offer 50% higher than industry standard to get good people based on risk of the company size?

    Exactly. We don't know much about them so can't speak to this one. But Cali startups, for example, often pay $300K for skills you could get for $200K in NYC if you were a bank. Stability, long term viability, low stress, big teams, big benefits... they are worth a lot.

    So approximately 50% in this case.



  • @scottalanmiller i sent you a message with the company website to see what your thoughts are


  • Service Provider

    @randyblevins said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    @scottalanmiller said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    @randyblevins said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    @scottalanmiller said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    @randyblevins said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    @scottalanmiller said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    @randyblevins said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    @scottalanmiller said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    @jaredbusch said in Enterprise to IT Service\Software Company:

    Epicorp makes a product called Profit 21. It has a good size market deployment both on site and hosted by Epicorp.

    But it is a legacy design LoB app. It is clunky to use and expensive to license simply because it requires all Microsoft licensing. Server, RDS CALs, User CALs, SQL Server, SQL CALs.

    And makes even them, at a decent size, a huge risk if that was their only product. Because a competitor could come along, recreate something for their market using modern tools and methods, charge more and still be chaper by not making half of the cost go to a third party!

    Yeah, that is my concern is that the company is a one trick pony. It seems like it's probably not a good idea to jump ship for something like this?

    I guess these companies come and go pretty often. I'm not sure on exact company size. I'm looking at their LinkedIn and basing it off that.

    I guess I should probably still interview for practice and see what the company looks like.

    It can be, you just have to be really careful and make sure that it fits your life goals. SMBs come and go every day. They have no longevity.

    What questions would you ask in the interview about the company?

    That's tough because companies lie continuously in these things. They'll say anything to make themselves sound good. But ask about the processes used, technologies used, ask them to explain some of their decision processes, ask about what makes them competitive both in tech and in operations, really grill them on their business model, funding, history, ownership, future goals, etc.

    So generally speaking 20% increase in salary actually isn't much considering the risk? A company that size would likely have to offer 50% higher than industry standard to get good people based on risk of the company size?

    Exactly. We don't know much about them so can't speak to this one. But Cali startups, for example, often pay $300K for skills you could get for $200K in NYC if you were a bank. Stability, long term viability, low stress, big teams, big benefits... they are worth a lot.

    So approximately 50% in this case.

    Yes, but some percentage of that is extra for making people live in San Fran which is total crap.


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