Miscellaneous Tech News



  • Facebook takes the EU to court over privacy spat

    Facebook has pushed back against a European Union investigation into its practices, taking it to court over privacy concerns.
    Two investigations are being carried out into Facebook to find out if it breaches competition laws. To gather information, the European Commission has demanded internal documents from Facebook that include 2,500 specific key phrases. Facebook says that means handing over unrelated but highly sensitive data. The European Commission says it will defend the case in court, and its investigation into Facebook's potential anticompetitive conduct is ongoing. The social media giant has filed an appeal to the EU courts, arguing against the breadth of the document requests.



  • Wiley: Rapper deleted from Facebook after abuse of Jewish critics

    Facebook has deleted the personal account of rapper Wiley after he shared abusive posts aimed at his Jewish critics.
    His comments came after an anti-Semitic tirade on Twitter on Friday. The BBC found posts on Facebook under his real name Richard Kylea Cowie. He specifically named Jewish celebrities - including Lord Alan Sugar, comedian David Baddiel and BBC presenter Emma Barnett. A Facebook spokesperson said Wiley's account was removed for "repeated violations" of its policies. It initially suspended, then deleted the grime artist's Facebook and Instagram profiles. The BBC has contacted the musician for comment. The posts aimed abuse at Jewish celebrities who had expressed their dismay about Wiley's tweets. Several of his posts mentioned "Golders Green" - a London neighbourhood with a large Jewish community.



  • https://www.infosecurity-magazine.com/news/dell-emc-patches-idrac/

    A vulnerability in the Integrated Dell Remote Access Controller (iDRAC) that could have allowed cyber-criminals to gain full control of server operations has been detected



  • Fedora 33 & BTRFS default

    Desktop only at this stage(?)



  • @warren-stanley said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Fedora 33 & BTRFS default

    Desktop only at this stage(?)

    Interesting



  • @warren-stanley said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Fedora 33 & BTRFS default

    Desktop only at this stage(?)

    I haven't used BTRFS in a long time... My advise is run... as far and as fast as you can, lol.



  • Yeah isn't btrfs a really old filesystem that no one really uses anymore or am I thinking of something else?



  • @dafyre said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @warren-stanley said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Fedora 33 & BTRFS default

    Desktop only at this stage(?)

    I haven't used BTRFS in a long time... My advise is run... as far and as fast as you can, lol.

    Well that clearly is not at all accurate if Fedora is working to push it as the default.



  • @jmoore said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Yeah isn't btrfs a really old filesystem that no one really uses anymore or am I thinking of something else?

    BTRFS has been around for a long time, yes



  • Will have to do some reading to see what's changed in last few years. I admit I have not kept up with it.



  • @dafyre said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @warren-stanley said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Fedora 33 & BTRFS default

    Desktop only at this stage(?)

    I haven't used BTRFS in a long time... My advise is run... as far and as fast as you can, lol.

    Why, I've had nothing but good luck with it.



  • @jmoore said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Yeah isn't btrfs a really old filesystem that no one really uses anymore or am I thinking of something else?

    It's the most up to date and modern filesystem with any widespread use. Literally every filesystem you know is much older except for maybe ReFS.



  • @DustinB3403 said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @jmoore said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Yeah isn't btrfs a really old filesystem that no one really uses anymore or am I thinking of something else?

    BTRFS has been around for a long time, yes

    In total years, yes. Compared to any other filesystem, no. I think you guys are thinking of Reiser.



  • @jmoore said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Will have to do some reading to see what's changed in last few years. I admit I have not kept up with it.

    BtrFS has been the "future" filesystem for Linux for years. But it's not been far enough along for most places to put into production yet. It's just getting to that point, now. That's why it is going to desktops, but not servers, at this point. This is the stage prior to it starting to replace XFS and EXT4 in production servers.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @jmoore said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Will have to do some reading to see what's changed in last few years. I admit I have not kept up with it.

    BtrFS has been the "future" filesystem for Linux for years. But it's not been far enough along for most places to put into production yet. It's just getting to that point, now. That's why it is going to desktops, but not servers, at this point. This is the stage prior to it starting to replace XFS and EXT4 in production servers.

    It's Facebook that have had problems with scaling xfs and invested a lot in btrfs.
    As you said, Fedora users are just beta testers for real production use. Consider it production ready when it ends up in RHEL.

    I read this a couple of weeks ago. Has some more info: https://lwn.net/Articles/824855/



  • @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @jmoore said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Will have to do some reading to see what's changed in last few years. I admit I have not kept up with it.

    BtrFS has been the "future" filesystem for Linux for years. But it's not been far enough along for most places to put into production yet. It's just getting to that point, now. That's why it is going to desktops, but not servers, at this point. This is the stage prior to it starting to replace XFS and EXT4 in production servers.

    We had it in production here on several systems. We suffered no end of FS corruption, and snapshots that won't delete for various reasons...systems randomly hanging and going down... We've upgraded all of the systems to newer OSes and use EXT4.



  • @dafyre said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @jmoore said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Will have to do some reading to see what's changed in last few years. I admit I have not kept up with it.

    BtrFS has been the "future" filesystem for Linux for years. But it's not been far enough along for most places to put into production yet. It's just getting to that point, now. That's why it is going to desktops, but not servers, at this point. This is the stage prior to it starting to replace XFS and EXT4 in production servers.

    We had it in production here on several systems. We suffered no end of FS corruption, and snapshots that won't delete for various reasons...systems randomly hanging and going down... We've upgraded all of the systems to newer OSes and use EXT4.

    Why EXT4 and not XFS? XFS is the mature, stable, fast one.

    Why were you using BtrFS in production? It's not considered ready even now, let alone anytime in the past. It's hoped to be classified as production in 1-2 years.



  • @Pete-S said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    As you said, Fedora users are just beta testers for real production use.

    Fedora DESKTOP, not Fedora.



  • @Pete-S said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Consider it production ready when it ends up in RHEL.

    No, that's when it's old. When it is in Fedora Server is when it's production.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @dafyre said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @jmoore said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Will have to do some reading to see what's changed in last few years. I admit I have not kept up with it.

    BtrFS has been the "future" filesystem for Linux for years. But it's not been far enough along for most places to put into production yet. It's just getting to that point, now. That's why it is going to desktops, but not servers, at this point. This is the stage prior to it starting to replace XFS and EXT4 in production servers.

    We had it in production here on several systems. We suffered no end of FS corruption, and snapshots that won't delete for various reasons...systems randomly hanging and going down... We've upgraded all of the systems to newer OSes and use EXT4.

    Why EXT4 and not XFS? XFS is the mature, stable, fast one.

    Why were you using BtrFS in production? It's not considered ready even now, let alone anytime in the past. It's hoped to be classified as production in 1-2 years.

    For the same reason that Fedora is trying to push it now... The vendor (SuSE, for us) thought it was a good idea to push as a sensible default at the time.



  • @dafyre said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @dafyre said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @jmoore said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Will have to do some reading to see what's changed in last few years. I admit I have not kept up with it.

    BtrFS has been the "future" filesystem for Linux for years. But it's not been far enough along for most places to put into production yet. It's just getting to that point, now. That's why it is going to desktops, but not servers, at this point. This is the stage prior to it starting to replace XFS and EXT4 in production servers.

    We had it in production here on several systems. We suffered no end of FS corruption, and snapshots that won't delete for various reasons...systems randomly hanging and going down... We've upgraded all of the systems to newer OSes and use EXT4.

    Why EXT4 and not XFS? XFS is the mature, stable, fast one.

    Why were you using BtrFS in production? It's not considered ready even now, let alone anytime in the past. It's hoped to be classified as production in 1-2 years.

    For the same reason that Fedora is trying to push it now... The vendor (SuSE, for us) thought it was a good idea to push as a sensible default at the time.

    Fedora isn't pushing now, that's for desktops. Where those things don't really matter. And BtrFS has been pretty stable for a while now. No idea what Suse was up to, but blindly taking defaults is never a good idea. That's how people got RAID 5 from Dell for years. Another example of a commonly bad default... EXT4. In that case, it's stable, it's just not as stable or as fast.



  • @scottalanmiller Agreed - I am looking forward to trying this on the Desktop side of things. Having the Fedora guys behind it should help with its implementation.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @dafyre said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @dafyre said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @jmoore said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Will have to do some reading to see what's changed in last few years. I admit I have not kept up with it.

    BtrFS has been the "future" filesystem for Linux for years. But it's not been far enough along for most places to put into production yet. It's just getting to that point, now. That's why it is going to desktops, but not servers, at this point. This is the stage prior to it starting to replace XFS and EXT4 in production servers.

    We had it in production here on several systems. We suffered no end of FS corruption, and snapshots that won't delete for various reasons...systems randomly hanging and going down... We've upgraded all of the systems to newer OSes and use EXT4.

    Why EXT4 and not XFS? XFS is the mature, stable, fast one.

    Why were you using BtrFS in production? It's not considered ready even now, let alone anytime in the past. It's hoped to be classified as production in 1-2 years.

    For the same reason that Fedora is trying to push it now... The vendor (SuSE, for us) thought it was a good idea to push as a sensible default at the time.

    Fedora isn't pushing now, that's for desktops. Where those things don't really matter. And BtrFS has been pretty stable for a while now. No idea what Suse was up to, but blindly taking defaults is never a good idea. That's how people got RAID 5 from Dell for years. Another example of a commonly bad default... EXT4. In that case, it's stable, it's just not as stable or as fast.

    Hmm... I'd like to think that things on desktops do matter, lol. Kinda hard to use Linux to watch videos or play games if my FS is corrupted and not working.

    I do hope it is stable for those who do use it, at least.



  • @Pete-S said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @jmoore said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Will have to do some reading to see what's changed in last few years. I admit I have not kept up with it.

    BtrFS has been the "future" filesystem for Linux for years. But it's not been far enough along for most places to put into production yet. It's just getting to that point, now. That's why it is going to desktops, but not servers, at this point. This is the stage prior to it starting to replace XFS and EXT4 in production servers.

    It's Facebook that have had problems with scaling xfs and invested a lot in btrfs.
    As you said, Fedora users are just beta testers for real production use. Consider it production ready when it ends up in RHEL.

    I read this a couple of weeks ago. Has some more info: https://lwn.net/Articles/824855/

    OpenSuse uses Btrfs by default.



  • @black3dynamite said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @Pete-S said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @jmoore said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Will have to do some reading to see what's changed in last few years. I admit I have not kept up with it.

    BtrFS has been the "future" filesystem for Linux for years. But it's not been far enough along for most places to put into production yet. It's just getting to that point, now. That's why it is going to desktops, but not servers, at this point. This is the stage prior to it starting to replace XFS and EXT4 in production servers.

    It's Facebook that have had problems with scaling xfs and invested a lot in btrfs.
    As you said, Fedora users are just beta testers for real production use. Consider it production ready when it ends up in RHEL.

    I read this a couple of weeks ago. Has some more info: https://lwn.net/Articles/824855/

    OpenSuse uses Btrfs by default.

    Still today?



  • @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @black3dynamite said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @Pete-S said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @jmoore said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Will have to do some reading to see what's changed in last few years. I admit I have not kept up with it.

    BtrFS has been the "future" filesystem for Linux for years. But it's not been far enough along for most places to put into production yet. It's just getting to that point, now. That's why it is going to desktops, but not servers, at this point. This is the stage prior to it starting to replace XFS and EXT4 in production servers.

    It's Facebook that have had problems with scaling xfs and invested a lot in btrfs.
    As you said, Fedora users are just beta testers for real production use. Consider it production ready when it ends up in RHEL.

    I read this a couple of weeks ago. Has some more info: https://lwn.net/Articles/824855/

    OpenSuse uses Btrfs by default.

    Still today?

    2a5b4450-1788-4bad-b213-7c752cb02a30-image.png

    d5b5ac5d-045b-49d4-9741-44ad2433322b-image.png



  • Coronavirus: Scotland developing its own contact-tracing app

    Scotland is developing its own coronavirus contact-tracing app, which it hopes to have ready for use in the autumn.
    It follows the failure of an NHS-branded app in England, which was trialled on the Isle of Wight. On Thursday, Northern Ireland became the first part of the UK to deploy a contact-tracing app. Both Scotland and Northern Ireland decided to adapt software already being used in the Republic of Ireland. Contact-tracing apps are designed to help prevent a second wave of the coronavirus. They work by logging when two people have been in close proximity to each other for a substantial period of time. If one of the users is later diagnosed as having the disease, an alert can be sent to others they have recently been close to, telling them that they should also get tested and/or self-isolate.



  • @black3dynamite said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @black3dynamite said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @Pete-S said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @jmoore said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Will have to do some reading to see what's changed in last few years. I admit I have not kept up with it.

    BtrFS has been the "future" filesystem for Linux for years. But it's not been far enough along for most places to put into production yet. It's just getting to that point, now. That's why it is going to desktops, but not servers, at this point. This is the stage prior to it starting to replace XFS and EXT4 in production servers.

    It's Facebook that have had problems with scaling xfs and invested a lot in btrfs.
    As you said, Fedora users are just beta testers for real production use. Consider it production ready when it ends up in RHEL.

    I read this a couple of weeks ago. Has some more info: https://lwn.net/Articles/824855/

    OpenSuse uses Btrfs by default.

    Still today?

    2a5b4450-1788-4bad-b213-7c752cb02a30-image.png

    d5b5ac5d-045b-49d4-9741-44ad2433322b-image.png

    Even Leap, wow!



  • @mlnews said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Coronavirus: Scotland developing its own contact-tracing app

    Scotland is developing its own coronavirus contact-tracing app, which it hopes to have ready for use in the autumn.
    It follows the failure of an NHS-branded app in England, which was trialled on the Isle of Wight. On Thursday, Northern Ireland became the first part of the UK to deploy a contact-tracing app. Both Scotland and Northern Ireland decided to adapt software already being used in the Republic of Ireland. Contact-tracing apps are designed to help prevent a second wave of the coronavirus. They work by logging when two people have been in close proximity to each other for a substantial period of time. If one of the users is later diagnosed as having the disease, an alert can be sent to others they have recently been close to, telling them that they should also get tested and/or self-isolate.

    Is there any evidence that this actually helps with anything?



  • @Dashrender said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @mlnews said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Coronavirus: Scotland developing its own contact-tracing app

    Scotland is developing its own coronavirus contact-tracing app, which it hopes to have ready for use in the autumn.
    It follows the failure of an NHS-branded app in England, which was trialled on the Isle of Wight. On Thursday, Northern Ireland became the first part of the UK to deploy a contact-tracing app. Both Scotland and Northern Ireland decided to adapt software already being used in the Republic of Ireland. Contact-tracing apps are designed to help prevent a second wave of the coronavirus. They work by logging when two people have been in close proximity to each other for a substantial period of time. If one of the users is later diagnosed as having the disease, an alert can be sent to others they have recently been close to, telling them that they should also get tested and/or self-isolate.

    Is there any evidence that this actually helps with anything?

    Beyond common sense? Yes...

    https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanpub/article/PIIS2468-2667(20)30157-2/fulltext


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