Miscellaneous Tech News



  • Google to pay for 'high quality' news in three countries

    Google says it will pay some news outlets for "high-quality" stories that it uses amid pressure from publishers.
    Part of the initiative will require Google to pay for its users to access news stories otherwise locked behind a so-called paywall on certain websites. The first sites to join are in Australia, Brazil, and Germany, with a product launch set for later this year. It comes as authorities in some countries investigate how tech firms use news content without paying for it. Australia has put forward plans to force Google and Facebook to pay news publishers under competition rules. France has already issued Google with an order to do so. It is the latest development in a long-standing row with news publishers over whether tech giants should pay them to include "snippets" of news articles in search results or on social media.



  • @mlnews said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Google to pay for 'high quality' news in three countries

    Google says it will pay some news outlets for "high-quality" stories that it uses amid pressure from publishers.
    Part of the initiative will require Google to pay for its users to access news stories otherwise locked behind a so-called paywall on certain websites. The first sites to join are in Australia, Brazil, and Germany, with a product launch set for later this year. It comes as authorities in some countries investigate how tech firms use news content without paying for it. Australia has put forward plans to force Google and Facebook to pay news publishers under competition rules. France has already issued Google with an order to do so. It is the latest development in a long-standing row with news publishers over whether tech giants should pay them to include "snippets" of news articles in search results or on social media.

    So the question is - will Google choose to just stop with snippets to those news sites like they did in the past.



  • Northern Ireland to launch separate contact-tracing app

    Northern Ireland is planning to release its own coronavirus contact-tracing app within weeks, the BBC has learned.
    It follows the failure of the NHS app in England, which was trialled on the Isle of Wight. The NI app will be based on the Google/Apple model. It is designed to be compatible with an app due to be released soon in the Republic of Ireland. That app is also based on the toolkit provided by Apple and Google. The Apple and Google model is more privacy-focused, but provides less data to epidemiologists than the centralised version that England was trialling. "The Health Minister has commissioned work to develop a proximity app, based on the de-centralised Google/ Apple model, for use in Northern Ireland," said the Northern Ireland Department of Health in a statement. "This work includes examining the interoperability of apps and the sharing of information across the border between Northern Ireland and the Republic," it said.





  • @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    https://gizmodo.com/microsoft-kills-one-of-its-best-windows-10-update-looph-1844180993

    That's a good thing.

    If we can test and keep many thousands of Windows PCs in many countries around the world that use many diverse apps current and updated, then I know anyone can. There's no excuse.

    If you want to run a PC out of date for years just install Linux.



  • @Obsolesce said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    If you want to run a PC out of date for years just install Linux.

    You mean distros like CentOS, Ubuntu LTS? Just saying Linux makes it sound like you are saying Linux in general.



  • @black3dynamite said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @Obsolesce said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    If you want to run a PC out of date for years just install Linux.

    You mean distros like CentOS, Ubuntu LTS? Just saying Linux makes it sound like you are saying Linux in general.

    Yes, Linux in general. It will never update on its own unless you tell it to. You can choose to never update. With windows and Mac, and Android I think, you are pretty much forced to stay mostly current.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @Grey said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    https://www.ixsystems.com/community/threads/starting-our-next-open-source-project-truenas-scale.85203/

    From the company that brought you "data loss" and "holy shit this screwed me" moments....

    When is the last time you used it?



  • @Obsolesce said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @black3dynamite said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @Obsolesce said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    If you want to run a PC out of date for years just install Linux.

    You mean distros like CentOS, Ubuntu LTS? Just saying Linux makes it sound like you are saying Linux in general.

    Yes, Linux in general. It will never update on its own unless you tell it to. You can choose to never update. With windows and Mac, and Android I think, you are pretty much forced to stay mostly current.

    Thats determined by distro and has no connection to Linux one way or the other.



  • @VoIP_n00b said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @Grey said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    https://www.ixsystems.com/community/threads/starting-our-next-open-source-project-truenas-scale.85203/

    From the company that brought you "data loss" and "holy shit this screwed me" moments....

    When is the last time you used it?

    I have no reason to run unsafe valueless hobby systems. I get to use it when I am brought in to save foolish companies who thought they could skip having IT skills or enterprise vendors for storage.

    You are implying by this question that a fundamentally bad and unsafe idea and process without value has to be constantly tried to be understood- but that is not the case.

    You dont have to stub your toe on each new piece of furniture once you understand that stubbing it itself hurts.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    You dont have to stub your toe on each new piece of furniture once you understand that stubbing it itself hurts.

    But stubbing your toe on different pieces of furniture would certainly teach you to watch where you are walking.



  • @DustinB3403 said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    You dont have to stub your toe on each new piece of furniture once you understand that stubbing it itself hurts.

    But stubbing your toe on different pieces of furniture would certainly teach you to watch where you are walking.

    That's my point, once you know how stubbing your toe works, you don't need to keep testing as you learn not to do it. FreeNas is like that. Once you know the pattern, you don't need to keep testing it since you already know the pattern isn't good.



  • @Obsolesce said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @black3dynamite said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @Obsolesce said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    If you want to run a PC out of date for years just install Linux.

    You mean distros like CentOS, Ubuntu LTS? Just saying Linux makes it sound like you are saying Linux in general.

    Yes, Linux in general. It will never update on its own unless you tell it to. You can choose to never update. With windows and Mac, and Android I think, you are pretty much forced to stay mostly current.

    Yeah - forcing is a good thing, no matter what people say - without forcing, 90% would never upgrade/update - leaving the internet a hugely vulnerable place...

    Wait wait wait - /sigh - it's still a hugely vulnerable place ūüėě



  • Could a boycott kill Facebook?

    Boycotts can be extremely effective - as Facebook is finding out.
    In the late 18th century, the abolitionist movement encouraged British people to stay away from goods produced by slaves. It worked. Around 300,000 stopped buying sugar - increasing the pressure to abolish slavery. The Stop Hate for Profit campaign is the latest movement to use boycott as a political tool. It claims that Facebook doesn't do enough to remove racist and hateful content from its platform. It's convinced a series of major companies - including Coca-Cola, Unilever and Starbucks - to pull advertising from Facebook and some other social media companies. Meanwhile, other online platforms, including Reddit and Twitch, have piled on more pressure by taking anti-hate steps of their own.



  • Huawei: Ministers signal switch in policy over 5G policy

    The government has signalled it is set to take a tougher line against Chinese telecoms equipment-maker Huawei.
    A review is under way into how forthcoming US sanctions would affect the UK's continued use of its products. "Given that these sanctions... are extensive, it is likely to have an impact on the viability of Huawei as a provider for the 5G network," said Digital Secretary Oliver Dowden. He added he wanted Samsung and NEC to become 5G network kit providers. They would help make the UK's mobile networks become less dependent on the other two suppliers: Ericsson and Nokia. Mr Dowden said the current situation represented a "market failure". Defence Secretary Ben Wallace added that the sanctions - which are set to come into effect in September - had specifically been designed to force the UK into a rethink.



  • @mlnews said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Could a boycott kill Facebook?

    Boycotts can be extremely effective - as Facebook is finding out.
    In the late 18th century, the abolitionist movement encouraged British people to stay away from goods produced by slaves. It worked. Around 300,000 stopped buying sugar - increasing the pressure to abolish slavery. The Stop Hate for Profit campaign is the latest movement to use boycott as a political tool. It claims that Facebook doesn't do enough to remove racist and hateful content from its platform. It's convinced a series of major companies - including Coca-Cola, Unilever and Starbucks - to pull advertising from Facebook and some other social media companies. Meanwhile, other online platforms, including Reddit and Twitch, have piled on more pressure by taking anti-hate steps of their own.

    I hope this kills facebook, or draws it back to a shell of it's former self.



  • @Grey said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @mlnews said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Could a boycott kill Facebook?

    Boycotts can be extremely effective - as Facebook is finding out.
    In the late 18th century, the abolitionist movement encouraged British people to stay away from goods produced by slaves. It worked. Around 300,000 stopped buying sugar - increasing the pressure to abolish slavery. The Stop Hate for Profit campaign is the latest movement to use boycott as a political tool. It claims that Facebook doesn't do enough to remove racist and hateful content from its platform. It's convinced a series of major companies - including Coca-Cola, Unilever and Starbucks - to pull advertising from Facebook and some other social media companies. Meanwhile, other online platforms, including Reddit and Twitch, have piled on more pressure by taking anti-hate steps of their own.

    I hope this kills facebook, or draws it back to a shell of it's former self.

    One can hope. But seems unlikely.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @Grey said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @mlnews said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Could a boycott kill Facebook?

    Boycotts can be extremely effective - as Facebook is finding out.
    In the late 18th century, the abolitionist movement encouraged British people to stay away from goods produced by slaves. It worked. Around 300,000 stopped buying sugar - increasing the pressure to abolish slavery. The Stop Hate for Profit campaign is the latest movement to use boycott as a political tool. It claims that Facebook doesn't do enough to remove racist and hateful content from its platform. It's convinced a series of major companies - including Coca-Cola, Unilever and Starbucks - to pull advertising from Facebook and some other social media companies. Meanwhile, other online platforms, including Reddit and Twitch, have piled on more pressure by taking anti-hate steps of their own.

    I hope this kills facebook, or draws it back to a shell of it's former self.

    One can hope. But seems unlikely.

    If it does, something likely equally as bad will replace it. People what what it offers, with the general simplicity that it offers.

    Forums are OK - but damn, they are a huge hassle when you just wanna scrolling feed of what people are up to.



  • Nothing will happen to FB except some face-saving.



  • University of California San Francisco pays ransomware gang $1.14 million.

    The University of California, San Francisco (USCF) has paid a ransomware demand of more than $1.4m. A ‚Äúlimited number of servers‚ÄĚ at the public health research facility were encrypted by Netwalker ransomware. UCSF disclosed the incident on June 3. BBC News was able to observe a live chat on the dark web involving UCSF ransom negotiations.

    Comments by Neely @ SANS

    The Netwalker operators used multiple techniques to entice UCSF into paying the ransom, including making both samples of exfiltrated data and the ransom negotiations visible to the press. For UCSF reputation risk is key to continued support as they are working on research to support the public good including a cure for C-19.

    More insight into Netwalker ransomware
    https://news.sophos.com/en-us/2020/05/27/netwalker-ransomware-tools-give-insight-into-threat-actor/



  • @Pete-S said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    University of California San Francisco pays ransomware gang $1.14 million.

    You misspelled "funds".



  • @Pete-S said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    University of California San Francisco pays ransomware gang $1.14 million.

    The University of California, San Francisco (USCF) has paid a ransomware demand of more than $1.4m. A ‚Äúlimited number of servers‚ÄĚ at the public health research facility were encrypted by Netwalker ransomware. UCSF disclosed the incident on June 3. BBC News was able to observe a live chat on the dark web involving UCSF ransom negotiations.

    Comments by Neely @ SANS

    The Netwalker operators used multiple techniques to entice UCSF into paying the ransom, including making both samples of exfiltrated data and the ransom negotiations visible to the press. For UCSF reputation risk is key to continued support as they are working on research to support the public good including a cure for C-19.

    More insight into Netwalker ransomware
    https://news.sophos.com/en-us/2020/05/27/netwalker-ransomware-tools-give-insight-into-threat-actor/

    I take it they did not have any backups, and the employees use their computers for LoB data storage.



  • @Obsolesce said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @Pete-S said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    University of California San Francisco pays ransomware gang $1.14 million.

    The University of California, San Francisco (USCF) has paid a ransomware demand of more than $1.4m. A ‚Äúlimited number of servers‚ÄĚ at the public health research facility were encrypted by Netwalker ransomware. UCSF disclosed the incident on June 3. BBC News was able to observe a live chat on the dark web involving UCSF ransom negotiations.

    Comments by Neely @ SANS

    The Netwalker operators used multiple techniques to entice UCSF into paying the ransom, including making both samples of exfiltrated data and the ransom negotiations visible to the press. For UCSF reputation risk is key to continued support as they are working on research to support the public good including a cure for C-19.

    More insight into Netwalker ransomware
    https://news.sophos.com/en-us/2020/05/27/netwalker-ransomware-tools-give-insight-into-threat-actor/

    I take it they did not have any backups, and the employees use their computers for LoB data storage.

    My guess is that they had backups for sure, probably multiple. But anyone who can do damage for a million bucks ain't no rookie. This is organized crime. People get their throats slashed for a lot less than a million. They of course had to make sure the backups couldn't be used.



  • @Pete-S said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @Obsolesce said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @Pete-S said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    University of California San Francisco pays ransomware gang $1.14 million.

    The University of California, San Francisco (USCF) has paid a ransomware demand of more than $1.4m. A ‚Äúlimited number of servers‚ÄĚ at the public health research facility were encrypted by Netwalker ransomware. UCSF disclosed the incident on June 3. BBC News was able to observe a live chat on the dark web involving UCSF ransom negotiations.

    Comments by Neely @ SANS

    The Netwalker operators used multiple techniques to entice UCSF into paying the ransom, including making both samples of exfiltrated data and the ransom negotiations visible to the press. For UCSF reputation risk is key to continued support as they are working on research to support the public good including a cure for C-19.

    More insight into Netwalker ransomware
    https://news.sophos.com/en-us/2020/05/27/netwalker-ransomware-tools-give-insight-into-threat-actor/

    I take it they did not have any backups, and the employees use their computers for LoB data storage.

    My guess is that they had backups for sure, probably multiple. But anyone who can do damage for a million bucks ain't no rookie. This is organized crime. People get their throats slashed for a lot less than a million. They of course had to make sure the backups couldn't be used.

    Unusable backups = no backups.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    I have no reason to run unsafe valueless hobby systems.

    Isn't that the same thing you said about Proxmox? Now you're the biggest Proxmox fan like your having a love affair with it or something. Maybe FreeNAS would be the same way.

    https://community.spiceworks.com/topic/273071-thinking-of-using-proxmox-do-i-need-to-pay-for-support?page=1#entry-1758737
    https://community.spiceworks.com/topic/314260-why-does-proxmox-troll-us?page=1#entry-2054440



  • @VoIP_n00b Would you jsut STFU Aaron. That post is from 8 fucking years ago.. There is a reason that @scottalanmiller's new post is titled "reconsidering"

    FFS pull your head out of your ass.





  • @VoIP_n00b said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Isn't that the same thing you said about Proxmox?

    No, did you not read the links you provided? FreeNAS is a problem because it is fundamentally flawed conceptually. That's why we say ad nauseum that NAS OSes are the problem, and FreeNAS is an example. That's 100% different than saying that hypervisor stacks are good, but Proxmox was a vendor acting badly.

    It's honestly shocking that you could confuse those two things. The degree to which they are unrelated is... well dramatic.

    You seem to have put a lot of effort into trying to either defend FreeNAS based on things that misdirection rather than actually showing how it would have value; or putting in a lot of effort to try to discredit me doing evaluations of products that had you put half that effort into thinking about IT concepts, you'd have come to the same conclusions and understood the products for yourself.

    Even just the titles of the links you used tell you everything that you need to know. You didn't even read the titles! WTF dude, lol.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @VoIP_n00b said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Isn't that the same thing you said about Proxmox?

    No, did you not read the links you provided? FreeNAS is a problem because it is fundamentally flawed conceptually. That's why we say ad nauseum that NAS OSes are the problem, and FreeNAS is an example. That's 100% different than saying that hypervisor stacks are good, but Proxmox was a vendor acting badly.

    It's honestly shocking that you could confuse those two things. The degree to which they are unrelated is... well dramatic.

    You seem to have put a lot of effort into trying to either defend FreeNAS based on things that misdirection rather than actually showing how it would have value; or putting in a lot of effort to try to discredit me doing evaluations of products that had you put half that effort into thinking about IT concepts, you'd have come to the same conclusions and understood the products for yourself.

    Even just the titles of the links you used tell you everything that you need to know. You didn't even read the titles! WTF dude, lol.

    I posted the news to keep people apprised, not to start a flame war.



  • Loot boxes: Lords call for 'immediate' gambling regulation

    The House of Lords Gambling Committee says video game loot boxes should be regulated under gambling laws.
    The Lords say loot boxes should be classified as "games of chance" - which would bring them under the Gambling Act 2005. "If a product looks like gambling and feels like gambling, it should be regulated as gambling," their report says. And they warn that such a change should not wait. "The Government must act immediately to bring loot boxes within the remit of gambling legislation and regulation," said a statement accompanying the report. Loot boxes have long been controversial in video games. They offer players a chance at a randomised reward when opened. To further complicate matters, boxes can often be bought for real money, and the rewards can sometimes be traded.


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