Pi Hole



  • Anyone using one? Looks sick 🙂

    https://pi-hole.net



  • I thought this post was just going to say "shut it" or something.



  • Had to open to figure out -

    I think that yes,... someone is as it was discussed previously. @travisdh1 maybe?



  • Idea is cool, the web interface for it is the real winner. You can see what it has been doing.





  • @gjacobse said in Pi Hole:

    Had to open to figure out -

    I think that yes,... someone is as it was discussed previously. @travisdh1 maybe?

    Now why would I want Mangolassi to not get some advertising revenue?



  • @travisdh1 said in Pi Hole:

    @gjacobse said in Pi Hole:

    Had to open to figure out -

    I think that yes,... someone is as it was discussed previously. @travisdh1 maybe?

    Now why would I want Mangolassi to not get some advertising revenue?

    Don't worry, this type of system does not and cannot affect sites like ML. This works by filtering ad domains, which is awesome because ad domains suck. That's how tracking and all kinds of bad things happen. ML doesn't use ad domains, it hosts its own images right off of the site so there is no tracking (more than the site already has) and no shared info or anything of the sort. So this type of ad blocking is actually ideal because ML doesn't show ads in the traditional sense.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Pi Hole:

    @travisdh1 said in Pi Hole:

    @gjacobse said in Pi Hole:

    Had to open to figure out -

    I think that yes,... someone is as it was discussed previously. @travisdh1 maybe?

    Now why would I want Mangolassi to not get some advertising revenue?

    Don't worry, this type of system does not and cannot affect sites like ML. This works by filtering ad domains, which is awesome because ad domains suck. That's how tracking and all kinds of bad things happen. ML doesn't use ad domains, it hosts its own images right off of the site so there is no tracking (more than the site already has) and no shared info or anything of the sort. So this type of ad blocking is actually ideal because ML doesn't show ads in the traditional sense.

    I might just have to set one up then.



  • I had one and it worked great. Blocked Google ads and other ads. Just point your DNS to it and worked like a charm.



  • @nerdydad said in Pi Hole:

    I had one and it worked great. Blocked Google ads and other ads. Just point your DNS to it and worked like a charm.

    You do not have it any longer?



  • @reid-cooper said in Pi Hole:

    @nerdydad said in Pi Hole:

    I had one and it worked great. Blocked Google ads and other ads. Just point your DNS to it and worked like a charm.

    You do not have it any longer?

    No. Some members of my family couldn't tell the difference between ad links and regular links when they were googling. They ended up at the Pi-Hole quite often. I tried to explain it to them, but it was computing for them.



  • I implemented it at work about a week ago. Aside from sexy looks, it works like a charm. I plan to implement it at home, and use it as a internal DNS and DHCP server too.

    0_1503667048993_pi-hole.png



  • @nerdydad said in Pi Hole:

    @reid-cooper said in Pi Hole:

    @nerdydad said in Pi Hole:

    I had one and it worked great. Blocked Google ads and other ads. Just point your DNS to it and worked like a charm.

    You do not have it any longer?

    No. Some members of my family couldn't tell the difference between ad links and regular links when they were googling. They ended up at the Pi-Hole quite often. I tried to explain it to them, but it was computing for them.

    Worked too well for their own good 🙂



  • ooooh this looks nice!



  • @aaronstuder said in Pi Hole:

    Anyone using one? Looks sick 🙂

    https://pi-hole.net

    I have one of these running at home and love it! It does a much better job of filtering out ads than Sophos ever could. And the ability to whitelist/blacklist so easily is a bonus too. Set it up as a VM, you won't regret it.



  • What about installing it on Vultr?



  • @aaronstuder said in Pi Hole:

    What about installing it on Vultr?

    You can install it on any supported Linux system, mine runs in Centos 7 LXD container. It's how you set it up as DNS proxy/server. Although local DNS is always preferred, once your queries are cached, latency is much lower than querying cloud instance.



  • @marcinozga said in Pi Hole:

    @aaronstuder said in Pi Hole:

    What about installing it on Vultr?

    You can install it on any supported Linux system, mine runs in Centos 7 LXD container. It's how you set it up as DNS proxy/server. Although local DNS is always preferred, once your queries are cached, latency is much lower than querying cloud instance.

    Plus, the Raspberry Pi will pay for itself within a year of Vultr use.



  • @aaronstuder said in Pi Hole:

    What about installing it on Vultr?

    That's perfect IF you want to share it between locations. Locally hosted is better if you want better DNS performance.



  • @nerdydad said in Pi Hole:

    @marcinozga said in Pi Hole:

    @aaronstuder said in Pi Hole:

    What about installing it on Vultr?

    You can install it on any supported Linux system, mine runs in Centos 7 LXD container. It's how you set it up as DNS proxy/server. Although local DNS is always preferred, once your queries are cached, latency is much lower than querying cloud instance.

    Plus, the Raspberry Pi will pay for itself within a year of Vultr use.

    Not realistically. Figure $60 for a working RP setup minimum, not including space, heat or power draw (all small, but non-zero.) Vultr would be $30. It would take two years to break even, three years to RP cost savings minimum.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Pi Hole:

    @nerdydad said in Pi Hole:

    @marcinozga said in Pi Hole:

    @aaronstuder said in Pi Hole:

    What about installing it on Vultr?

    You can install it on any supported Linux system, mine runs in Centos 7 LXD container. It's how you set it up as DNS proxy/server. Although local DNS is always preferred, once your queries are cached, latency is much lower than querying cloud instance.

    Plus, the Raspberry Pi will pay for itself within a year of Vultr use.

    Not realistically. Figure $60 for a working RP setup minimum, not including space, heat or power draw (all small, but non-zero.) Vultr would be $30. It would take two years to break even, three years to RP cost savings minimum.

    If it lasts 3 years. Typically, power failure will cause the SD card to corrupt. Then, you'd have to reinvest into another SD card and start all over.



  • @nerdydad said in Pi Hole:

    @scottalanmiller said in Pi Hole:

    @nerdydad said in Pi Hole:

    @marcinozga said in Pi Hole:

    @aaronstuder said in Pi Hole:

    What about installing it on Vultr?

    You can install it on any supported Linux system, mine runs in Centos 7 LXD container. It's how you set it up as DNS proxy/server. Although local DNS is always preferred, once your queries are cached, latency is much lower than querying cloud instance.

    Plus, the Raspberry Pi will pay for itself within a year of Vultr use.

    Not realistically. Figure $60 for a working RP setup minimum, not including space, heat or power draw (all small, but non-zero.) Vultr would be $30. It would take two years to break even, three years to RP cost savings minimum.

    If it lasts 3 years. Typically, power failure will cause the SD card to corrupt. Then, you'd have to reinvest into another SD card and start all over.

    And with the time/value of money, it makes the Vultr approach better and better, unless you already have a place on your network where you can easily run the Pi Hole. Running dedicated RPs rarely makes sense as they are too low powered and costly compared to a tiny VM on Vultr or similar. An RP doesn't really have any more power than a tiny Vultr VM. And Vultr VMs are growing in capacity faster than RPs are version to version.



  • @nerdydad said in Pi Hole:

    @scottalanmiller said in Pi Hole:

    @nerdydad said in Pi Hole:

    @marcinozga said in Pi Hole:

    @aaronstuder said in Pi Hole:

    What about installing it on Vultr?

    You can install it on any supported Linux system, mine runs in Centos 7 LXD container. It's how you set it up as DNS proxy/server. Although local DNS is always preferred, once your queries are cached, latency is much lower than querying cloud instance.

    Plus, the Raspberry Pi will pay for itself within a year of Vultr use.

    Not realistically. Figure $60 for a working RP setup minimum, not including space, heat or power draw (all small, but non-zero.) Vultr would be $30. It would take two years to break even, three years to RP cost savings minimum.

    If it lasts 3 years. Typically, power failure will cause the SD card to corrupt. Then, you'd have to reinvest into another SD card and start all over.

    I mean, its not hard to install Raspbian, sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade, then curl Pi Hole. Could have another setup in an hour after failure.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Pi Hole:

    @nerdydad said in Pi Hole:

    @scottalanmiller said in Pi Hole:

    @nerdydad said in Pi Hole:

    @marcinozga said in Pi Hole:

    @aaronstuder said in Pi Hole:

    What about installing it on Vultr?

    You can install it on any supported Linux system, mine runs in Centos 7 LXD container. It's how you set it up as DNS proxy/server. Although local DNS is always preferred, once your queries are cached, latency is much lower than querying cloud instance.

    Plus, the Raspberry Pi will pay for itself within a year of Vultr use.

    Not realistically. Figure $60 for a working RP setup minimum, not including space, heat or power draw (all small, but non-zero.) Vultr would be $30. It would take two years to break even, three years to RP cost savings minimum.

    If it lasts 3 years. Typically, power failure will cause the SD card to corrupt. Then, you'd have to reinvest into another SD card and start all over.

    And with the time/value of money, it makes the Vultr approach better and better, unless you already have a place on your network where you can easily run the Pi Hole. Running dedicated RPs rarely makes sense as they are too low powered and costly compared to a tiny VM on Vultr or similar. An RP doesn't really have any more power than a tiny Vultr VM. And Vultr VMs are growing in capacity faster than RPs are version to version.

    They're also more capable because more applications are designed for x86_64-bit procs instead of the RPi's ARM procs. If you're doing something with an RPi, then you probably have intentions of using the GPIO pins instead of anything more software-based that would be better suited for a VM, either on a local laptop, a home lab, or Vultr.



  • @nerdydad said in Pi Hole:

    @nerdydad said in Pi Hole:

    @scottalanmiller said in Pi Hole:

    @nerdydad said in Pi Hole:

    @marcinozga said in Pi Hole:

    @aaronstuder said in Pi Hole:

    What about installing it on Vultr?

    You can install it on any supported Linux system, mine runs in Centos 7 LXD container. It's how you set it up as DNS proxy/server. Although local DNS is always preferred, once your queries are cached, latency is much lower than querying cloud instance.

    Plus, the Raspberry Pi will pay for itself within a year of Vultr use.

    Not realistically. Figure $60 for a working RP setup minimum, not including space, heat or power draw (all small, but non-zero.) Vultr would be $30. It would take two years to break even, three years to RP cost savings minimum.

    If it lasts 3 years. Typically, power failure will cause the SD card to corrupt. Then, you'd have to reinvest into another SD card and start all over.

    I mean, its not hard to install Raspbian, sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade, then curl Pi Hole. Could have another setup in an hour after failure.

    With containers and ansible, I had mine ready in probably less than 3 minutes. You can probably do it by hand just as fast.



  • @nerdydad said in Pi Hole:

    @scottalanmiller said in Pi Hole:

    @nerdydad said in Pi Hole:

    @scottalanmiller said in Pi Hole:

    @nerdydad said in Pi Hole:

    @marcinozga said in Pi Hole:

    @aaronstuder said in Pi Hole:

    What about installing it on Vultr?

    You can install it on any supported Linux system, mine runs in Centos 7 LXD container. It's how you set it up as DNS proxy/server. Although local DNS is always preferred, once your queries are cached, latency is much lower than querying cloud instance.

    Plus, the Raspberry Pi will pay for itself within a year of Vultr use.

    Not realistically. Figure $60 for a working RP setup minimum, not including space, heat or power draw (all small, but non-zero.) Vultr would be $30. It would take two years to break even, three years to RP cost savings minimum.

    If it lasts 3 years. Typically, power failure will cause the SD card to corrupt. Then, you'd have to reinvest into another SD card and start all over.

    And with the time/value of money, it makes the Vultr approach better and better, unless you already have a place on your network where you can easily run the Pi Hole. Running dedicated RPs rarely makes sense as they are too low powered and costly compared to a tiny VM on Vultr or similar. An RP doesn't really have any more power than a tiny Vultr VM. And Vultr VMs are growing in capacity faster than RPs are version to version.

    They're also more capable because more applications are designed for x86_64-bit procs instead of the RPi's ARM procs. If you're doing something with an RPi, then you probably have intentions of using the GPIO pins instead of anything more software-based that would be better suited for a VM, either on a local laptop, a home lab, or Vultr.

    Anything with a script based language is architecture agnostic. One of the many benefits of Python.





  • Anyone try on Fedora? Installer did not work here.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Pi Hole:

    Anyone try on Fedora? Installer did not work here.

    Mine was always on Raspbian.



  • On Fedora there were errors on exit, but it said that it finished. And SELinux is not supported, but you can turn that off or whatever. But it never seemed to configure anything. Testing Ubuntu now.


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