Time allocation for training



  • I work in a Windows shop with a small smattering of Linux (wiki and a postfix server that relays to SendGrid). I am torn with where to spend my training efforts.

    On one hand, I have my current personal interest: Linux server administration. On the other hand, there are skills I need to develop to better do my current job. It would seem the obvious answer is "spend your time at home bettering your skills for work." However, I do not believe I'll spend the remainder of my career at this company, so it seems an argument could be made to acquire skills necessary for the "next" gig. Perhaps another approach would be to do "both." Spend majority of my time doing tasks in my home lab to hone skills needed for work and spend the minority of my time acquiring Linux server admin skills. Once I feel more competent with my work tasks, change the balance of time.

    How do you folks spend your training and lab time?



  • @eddiejennings I would recommend to train to start by looking where are your weaknesses and unfamiliar systems so you can work your way there. Then you can work on newer things.
    I work on labs for upcoming projects and new technologies I believe will be needed soon.


  • Service Provider

    First.... if your work is paying for the training, focus on what brings them value, but isn't useless for you. If you are paying for the training (like doing it in your own time) do whatever is best for your career or satisfies your interests.


  • Service Provider

    Keep in mind that learning Linux administration is not lost on Windows admins. It is pretty rare that learning what is considered good on Linux won't do leaps and bounds for your Windows approaches. If you are the most amazing Windows admin ever and doing everything with scripts and automation and state machines then no, UNIX administration won't do a lot for you. But until they do it on UNIX, it's pretty rare that Windows admins do those things.


  • Service Provider

    Learning what is generic and what is Windows specific is a big benefit of learning something else. It's amazing how often that working in a single technology environment will result in tunnel vision. It's easy to lose perspective and assume that people all do the same things in the same way. But, in reality, there are so many ways to approach problems.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Time allocation for training:

    First.... if your work is paying for the training, focus on what brings them value, but isn't useless for you. If you are paying for the training (like doing it in your own time) do whatever is best for your career or satisfies your interests.

    This is training I'd be doing on my own time. I don't have the luxury of official training built into work; however, I make use of my time when I'm not dealing with tickets, emergencies, and projects at work to do tasks that will help me do my work better.



  • I'm with Scott, if your company expects you to have specific skills for them and you didn't walk through the door with those skills, then they need to provide you paid time to acquire them. But your time is your time. Learn what you want to help you further your career.


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