How would you run Windows applications in your preferred Linux Distro?



  • So we have a business need that requires we run Microsoft Office. This is not on the table for discussion of whether or not that can be changed.

    With that out of the way, how would you all handle that in your preferred distro? We're looking at running Fedora/Ubuntu/Korora on Dell laptops, but we have to have MS Office because we have to be able guarantee the output we produce is viewed by our government customers exactly as we create it.

    Running a full Windows VM is an option. I've wondered if there is something the equivalent of Parallels, where it exposes guest applications to the host OS, for Linux.

    Any thoughts, questions, etc.?



  • Haha, I deleted my own post. Stupid. :)



  • That's stupid in that my answer was stupid. Carry on!


  • Service Provider

    I'm not sure with that much info that I'd have a "go to" solution. It really depends.

    Office 365 offers an online version of MS Office. It's real MS Office, so maybe that would work. That's literally how I handle it here today. But I need it VERY little.

    Wine generally works very well for this, too. Traditionally, Wine works hardest on MS Office, that's the key focus and traditionally has worked beautifully. I don't know if it still does, but until recently this was rock solid and worked basically like a native app.

    I don't believe there is a Parallels option. Using KVM or VirtualBox will both work, though. These days, I'd favour KVM. Works really well. But if I can avoid needing to deploy and manage Windows VMs, I would.



  • @scottalanmiller said

    Office 365 offers an online version of MS Office. It's real MS Office, so maybe that would work. That's literally how I handle it here today. But I need it VERY little.

    It is limited in a lot of ways, though. They'd have to ensure it does what they want.


  • Service Provider

    @Kelly said in How would you run Windows applications in your preferred Linux Distro?:

    ..., but we have to have MS Office because we have to be able guarantee the output we produce is viewed by our government customers exactly as we create it.

    Different discussion, but normally that means PDF, not Office formats. This isn't the purpose or function of Office formats from any vendor. They are collaboration, not guaranteed viewing, formats.

    MS Office online will do this, though. If this is the cause of the requirement, you have that option.



  • I don't believe WINE works with the Click 2 Run versions of Office (eg Office 365 installs)



  • @scottalanmiller said in How would you run Windows applications in your preferred Linux Distro?:

    @Kelly said in How would you run Windows applications in your preferred Linux Distro?:

    ..., but we have to have MS Office because we have to be able guarantee the output we produce is viewed by our government customers exactly as we create it.

    Different discussion, but normally that means PDF, not Office formats. This isn't the purpose or function of Office formats from any vendor. They are collaboration, not guaranteed viewing, formats.

    MS Office online will do this, though. If this is the cause of the requirement, you have that option.

    That was my original post, then realized that's not helpful unless they already have Office running.

    So now I don't feel so stupid. :)



  • @brianlittlejohn said in How would you run Windows applications in your preferred Linux Distro?:

    I don't believe WINE works with the Click 2 Run versions of Office (eg Office 365 installs)

    That is unfortunate.



  • @Kelly said in How would you run Windows applications in your preferred Linux Distro?:

    So we have a business need that requires we run Microsoft Office. This is not on the table for discussion of whether or not that can be changed.

    With that out of the way, how would you all handle that in your preferred distro? We're looking at running Fedora/Ubuntu/Korora on Dell laptops, but we have to have MS Office because we have to be able guarantee the output we produce is viewed by our government customers exactly as we create it.

    Running a full Windows VM is an option. I've wondered if there is something the equivalent of Parallels, where it exposes guest applications to the host OS, for Linux.

    Any thoughts, questions, etc.?

    there are 2 options: wine or full vm with windows licence. according to the hypervisor your use there is a mock up to add win apps to the linux menu when the VM is running in background.

    in my experience wine is basically broken. anyway you can have a look at the compatibility list

    here where the installer of MS works or not
    if apps work has to be searched through the DB


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