Another JumpCloud thread to find the latest info



  • I was just reading the https://mangolassi.it/topic/7891/alternative-to-azure-ad-jumpcloud thread and just wondering if anyone here using JumpCloud in a production environment. If yes, can you please share your experience?

    I am in the process of bringing all of our Linux/Mac boxes under the LDAP to tighten the security but JumpCloud looks more appropriate to manage a heterogeneous network spread across all over the places.


  • Service Provider

    Looks like a nice product but am not using it as it seems too costly.



  • I looked at them but there is no support for Fedora or OpenSUSE. Only RHEL/CentOS, Ubuntu LTS, Debian, and Amazon Linux.

    Only seems geared towards server setups and I'd want it more for desktop auth.


  • Service Provider

    @stacksofplates said in Another JumpCloud thread to find the latest info:

    I looked at them but there is no support for Fedora or OpenSUSE. Only RHEL/CentOS, Ubuntu LTS, Debian, and Amazon Linux.

    Only seems geared towards server setups and I'd want it more for desktop auth.

    That makes little sense to me. Who would want this for servers? Someone, definitely, but seems like a "few and far between" kind of thing. Desktops is exactly where I would want it.

    And our servers are a lot of CentOS but those are mostly moving to Fedora. The only Ubuntu we have is current, not LTS. And we use OpenSuse, but not Debian. Debian is a small player in the server space. Very small. This seems like a lineup not well suited to any specific arena.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Another JumpCloud thread to find the latest info:

    @stacksofplates said in Another JumpCloud thread to find the latest info:

    I looked at them but there is no support for Fedora or OpenSUSE. Only RHEL/CentOS, Ubuntu LTS, Debian, and Amazon Linux.

    Only seems geared towards server setups and I'd want it more for desktop auth.

    That makes little sense to me. Who would want this for servers? Someone, definitely, but seems like a "few and far between" kind of thing. Desktops is exactly where I would want it.

    And our servers are a lot of CentOS but those are mostly moving to Fedora. The only Ubuntu we have is current, not LTS. And we use OpenSuse, but not Debian. Debian is a small player in the server space. Very small. This seems like a lineup not well suited to any specific arena.

    Someone with a small number of them. I can't imagine managing a large number of them by manually logging in. And if you have a small enough infrastructure to be doing that I don't think you would need this solution.

    Maybe they just completely misunderstand the Linux server/desktop arena.



  • @stacksofplates said in Another JumpCloud thread to find the latest info:

    They just completely misunderstand the Linux server/desktop arena.

    Fixed.


  • Service Provider

    Why they think servers only makes no sense. It's like they aren't even familiar with how desktops are used.



  • @sn said in Another JumpCloud thread to find the latest info:

    I am in the process of bringing all of our Linux/Mac boxes under the LDAP to tighten the security but JumpCloud looks more appropriate to manage a heterogeneous network spread across all over the places.

    The idea with Jump is that it is using some universally generic authentication technologies that don't require a local connection to be secure and are not directly related to any desktop platform. But it is expensive, which is the big issue.



  • Greetings folks!

    Nice to see a few of you contributing to various JumpClodu threads. Let me give you a bit of background on 'why Servers' with JumpCloud...

    Roll back time: It's where we began. The original instantiation of JumpCloud was to provide a central authentication and management console across Linux/Windows servers in any cloud service (e.g. AWS, Google Cloud, Rackspace, Softlayer and so on). The main thrust of what we were doing/offering (and still offer) fairly progressively, was to provide REST services to stimulate the efficiency of large-scale server infra - and mainly very ephemeral infra. The use cases varied but generally speaking, DevOps guys would bake our image into an AMI or similar image, and when they would light these up, they would perform initialization routines against the JC Directory....drop users accounts on, enable POSIX Groups, deploy sysadmins SSH keys, etc etc. It became a 'thing' and basically obviated the need for LDAP servers and wrangling with PAM. Yes, there are super elegant methods for this now....but mainly codified. e.g., Chef, Puppet, Salt, etc. These are actually used in concert with us but there is overlap.

    FWIW, feel free to geek on this KB and go play with our APIs and SDKs on Github:
    https://support.jumpcloud.com/customer/portal/articles/2429680

    This use case is still extremely important for our customer base. We see a typical pattern of companies evaluating us, driven by DevOps where they get to get 100's or in the case of quite a few customers of our larger customers, 1-2K virtual servers. They find success and this bleeds to general IT *(e.g. those servicing rank and file employees and their personal systems, networks and apps).

    So that's effectively the story, absolutely feel free to ping us to go deeper in the server management side of things!

    Greg


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