XP Mode on Windows 10



  • @DustinB3403 said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    @Carnival-Boy said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    @scottalanmiller said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    For the simplest current solution, I'd hit eBay and grab XP. I am guessing that XP is getting more expensive these days as people who have a copy know that they control the supply and that no more will ever be available.

    Isn't eBay a bit dodgy? What happens when it won't activate and you phone Microsoft and explain that you bought it off eBay? Are they likely to be sympathetic?

    If you have the certificate of authenticity, then they can't really question you besides to provide proof of purchase (which is the certificate of authenticity).

    That's the part people often refuse to send, though.



  • @scottalanmiller said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    @DustinB3403 said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    @Carnival-Boy said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    @scottalanmiller said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    For the simplest current solution, I'd hit eBay and grab XP. I am guessing that XP is getting more expensive these days as people who have a copy know that they control the supply and that no more will ever be available.

    Isn't eBay a bit dodgy? What happens when it won't activate and you phone Microsoft and explain that you bought it off eBay? Are they likely to be sympathetic?

    If you have the certificate of authenticity, then they can't really question you besides to provide proof of purchase (which is the certificate of authenticity).

    That's the part people often refuse to send, though.

    Yeah.... well can't really do anything about that though. It is the proof you own the key. Without it, you're out of compliance with the EULA from microsoft.



  • @DustinB3403 said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    @scottalanmiller said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    @DustinB3403 said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    @Carnival-Boy said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    @scottalanmiller said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    For the simplest current solution, I'd hit eBay and grab XP. I am guessing that XP is getting more expensive these days as people who have a copy know that they control the supply and that no more will ever be available.

    Isn't eBay a bit dodgy? What happens when it won't activate and you phone Microsoft and explain that you bought it off eBay? Are they likely to be sympathetic?

    If you have the certificate of authenticity, then they can't really question you besides to provide proof of purchase (which is the certificate of authenticity).

    That's the part people often refuse to send, though.

    Yeah.... well can't really do anything about that though. It is the proof you own the key. Without it, you're out of compliance with the EULA from microsoft.

    Yup, understood, but that is the dodgy bit with a lot of resellers. They sell everything but the part that matters.



  • @Carnival-Boy said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    When I was programming I assumed that my programs would be upgraded way soon than 20 years. I never once thought "wait a minute, this is 16 bit, what happens when people can only run 64 bit OSes?". And it's not normally a massive job if you keep the source code and the code is well documented. Problems occur when the source code disappears, for whatever reason, and there is no documentation. So you have to re-write the program from scratch.

    For all I know, people are going through this exact thing with programs I wrote 20 years ago. I'd like to think that my programs were that awesome that they're still in use, but i doubt it.

    Why do you doubt it? This happens all the time. I've forgotten how many old ass programs I've run into while consulting that had a reliance on DOS, etc. Once a business finds something they can tolerate, they rarely move away from it.



  • @scottalanmiller said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    @Dashrender said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    I understand that companies need to make money, and make it continuously - but to purposefully timebomb with no option other than complete replacement, seems borderline criminal - and frankly, like a lot of credit.

    It should be considered criminal but generally people get it signed off on to protect themselves. And doing it often sounds casual to non-programmers. If you've ever heard someone say something like this "We're going to just use Visual Basic because it is what I know and not going to do some fancy web application but just make a basic desktop application to keep things simple..." you just heard a standard sales pitch for timebombing. They took something enterprise capable (VB) and are using it in a compiled non-enterprise (non-standard enterprise at least) mode and removed the controls that would generally protect the company. Does anything in that statement alone time bomb the code? Nope, but it all sets it up for it. It's using archaic and/or non-standard libraries and such that really does it, but doing legacy apps in a compiled way with less than standard methods or tools makes the development process harder while basically guaranteeing that simple software that could easily last decades will stop being supportable very quickly.

    On the other hand, write something in PHP with a web interface and while it might time bomb it is unlikely to do so for an extremely long time, and even if it does the chances are extremely high that fixing it will be quick and easy. It also guarantees that the source code will be available as long as the system is running.

    I only have one come back to that - often those 'time bombed' desktops apps are easy enough for the non technical, yet dedicated, employee to figure out and get something working.

    Not saying this is a good thing, just mentioning that often companies (rightly or wrongly - probably wrongly) look at it and go - heck if Bill can just build that, we don't have to hire NTG to come in and build something for us, something we'd have to pay a lot more than Bill's time for what Bill builds.

    Getting over this hump is often difficult if not impossible.

    I had this very situation last year. Someone built an Access DB - I was like - WHAT are you doing? you should do that with tools that are more likely forward compatible, etc. Boss didn't care - it works for today and it cost very little versus hiring someone (because they want it NOW, and since I don't know how to build those things now, it would have to be hired out) and paying probably several thousand if not more.



  • @scottalanmiller said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    @DustinB3403 said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    @scottalanmiller said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    @DustinB3403 said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    @Carnival-Boy said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    @scottalanmiller said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    For the simplest current solution, I'd hit eBay and grab XP. I am guessing that XP is getting more expensive these days as people who have a copy know that they control the supply and that no more will ever be available.

    Isn't eBay a bit dodgy? What happens when it won't activate and you phone Microsoft and explain that you bought it off eBay? Are they likely to be sympathetic?

    If you have the certificate of authenticity, then they can't really question you besides to provide proof of purchase (which is the certificate of authenticity).

    That's the part people often refuse to send, though.

    Yeah.... well can't really do anything about that though. It is the proof you own the key. Without it, you're out of compliance with the EULA from microsoft.

    Yup, understood, but that is the dodgy bit with a lot of resellers. They sell everything but the part that matters.

    well if you buy that, that's on you - it's the only part that matters in most cases, I have a dozen XP CDs lying around, the license is another story.



  • @Dashrender said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    @scottalanmiller said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    @Dashrender said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    I understand that companies need to make money, and make it continuously - but to purposefully timebomb with no option other than complete replacement, seems borderline criminal - and frankly, like a lot of credit.

    It should be considered criminal but generally people get it signed off on to protect themselves. And doing it often sounds casual to non-programmers. If you've ever heard someone say something like this "We're going to just use Visual Basic because it is what I know and not going to do some fancy web application but just make a basic desktop application to keep things simple..." you just heard a standard sales pitch for timebombing. They took something enterprise capable (VB) and are using it in a compiled non-enterprise (non-standard enterprise at least) mode and removed the controls that would generally protect the company. Does anything in that statement alone time bomb the code? Nope, but it all sets it up for it. It's using archaic and/or non-standard libraries and such that really does it, but doing legacy apps in a compiled way with less than standard methods or tools makes the development process harder while basically guaranteeing that simple software that could easily last decades will stop being supportable very quickly.

    On the other hand, write something in PHP with a web interface and while it might time bomb it is unlikely to do so for an extremely long time, and even if it does the chances are extremely high that fixing it will be quick and easy. It also guarantees that the source code will be available as long as the system is running.

    I only have one come back to that - often those 'time bombed' desktops apps are easy enough for the non technical, yet dedicated, employee to figure out and get something working.

    Not saying this is a good thing, just mentioning that often companies (rightly or wrongly - probably wrongly) look at it and go - heck if Bill can just build that, we don't have to hire NTG to come in and build something for us, something we'd have to pay a lot more than Bill's time for what Bill builds.

    Getting over this hump is often difficult if not impossible.

    I had this very situation last year. Someone built an Access DB - I was like - WHAT are you doing? you should do that with tools that are more likely forward compatible, etc. Boss didn't care - it works for today and it cost very little versus hiring someone (because they want it NOW, and since I don't know how to build those things now, it would have to be hired out) and paying probably several thousand if not more.

    Yes, but YOUR boss specifically doesn't have the business interest of the company in mind, that we know. So that they set the company up for monetary loss isn't surprising. That's not a good indicator. Sure, lots of SMBs act the same, but that doesn't affect what good is.



  • @scottalanmiller said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    Yes, but YOUR boss specifically doesn't have the business interest of the company in mind, that we know. So that they set the company up for monetary loss isn't surprising. That's not a good indicator. Sure, lots of SMBs act the same, but that doesn't affect what good is.

    It's still a massive problem to overcome. I'm sure @Jaredbusch's company has come up against this when trying to deploy solutions - I wonder how often he's won/lost?



  • @Dashrender said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    @scottalanmiller said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    Yes, but YOUR boss specifically doesn't have the business interest of the company in mind, that we know. So that they set the company up for monetary loss isn't surprising. That's not a good indicator. Sure, lots of SMBs act the same, but that doesn't affect what good is.

    It's still a massive problem to overcome. I'm sure @Jaredbusch's company has come up against this when trying to deploy solutions - I wonder how often he's won/lost?

    Jared, like me, tends to talk in money terms. When your boss said she didn't care about doing "The right thing" was she forced to discuss it as a business proposition or just as a technology one? If you present it as "wasting money" and make someone say "I'm authorizing wasting money, just because I want to", things tend to not go the same way. It's not 100% success, but stopping a technology discussion run around and keeping decisions about the business does a LOT to stop people from doing these things.



  • I'm still confused about Microsoft licencing.

    Was reading this Spiceworks post by Chris from Microsoft:
    https://community.spiceworks.com/how_to/124053-licensing-windows-10-with-virtualization-technologies-how-to

    and noted this quote:
    Q. I need to access Windows XP Pro VMs remotely from my server, how can I license this?
    A. Windows SA or Windows VDA would be the license option here from the Windows desktop OS perspective. However, you would already need to have access to the Windows XP Pro OS as the Microsoft Volume License Service Center (VLSC) only provides (n-2) Windows rights to Windows 7. You are licensed to run Windows XP Pro or previous versions, Microsoft just no longer provides the media/keys.

    Does this mean SA will give me a licence to install an XP VM. People on this ML thread seem to indicate that it is impossible to licence XP now, by any means.

    What am I missing here?



  • @Carnival-Boy said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    I'm still confused about Microsoft licencing.

    Was reading this Spiceworks post by Chris from Microsoft:
    https://community.spiceworks.com/how_to/124053-licensing-windows-10-with-virtualization-technologies-how-to

    and noted this quote:
    Q. I need to access Windows XP Pro VMs remotely from my server, how can I license this?
    A. Windows SA or Windows VDA would be the license option here from the Windows desktop OS perspective. However, you would already need to have access to the Windows XP Pro OS as the Microsoft Volume License Service Center (VLSC) only provides (n-2) Windows rights to Windows 7. You are licensed to run Windows XP Pro or previous versions, Microsoft just no longer provides the media/keys.

    Does this mean SA will give me a licence to install an XP VM. People on this ML thread seem to indicate that it is impossible to licence XP now, by any means.

    What am I missing here?

    Chris is talking about the license to access. You need VDI licensing to access. But you still need a license to install. And the later is what MS no longer sells. If you acquire both you are good.



  • SA alone never gives desktop install rights.



  • Would be clearer if he'd written 'you are licenced to access' rather than 'you are licenced to run'.

    I thought SA did give desktop install rights. For example, if purchase SA for my Windows 7 Pro OEM licence, I thought I was entitled to install Windows 7 Enterprise on my desktop. No?



  • @Carnival-Boy said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    Would be clearer if he'd written 'you are licenced to access' rather than 'you are licenced to run'.

    I thought SA did give desktop install rights. For example, if purchase SA for my Windows 7 Pro OEM licence, I thought I was entitled to install Windows 7 Enterprise on my desktop. No?

    You are entitled to upgrade your OEM Pro to enterprise. But the install comes from the OEM license.



  • I know. But you don't get additional rights to install VMs on the client? I'm looking a document like this for clarification:
    https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/simonmay/2011/01/13/windows-7-licensing-and-virtual-machines-clarified/

    Specifically where it says:
    *If I install and run four additional copies of the operating system, do I have to use Windows 7 Enterprise as the host operating system?
    No. You may use prior versions of Windows



  • Funnily enough, someone has just started a new thread on this on Spiceworks. Again, it leaves me confused. ML's response seems to be that it is currently impossible to licence an XP VM in any form.

    But Chris writes "You would need Windows 10 Enterprise E3 or E5 to be properly licensed"

    and "To license the use of a Windows desktop OS instance from a server, you license the accessing device(s) with either a Windows SA license or Windows VDA license. Windows SA is included with the Windows 10 Enterprise E3/E5 licenses through Volume Licensing."



  • @Carnival-Boy said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    I know. But you don't get additional rights to install VMs on the client? I'm looking a document like this for clarification:
    https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/simonmay/2011/01/13/windows-7-licensing-and-virtual-machines-clarified/

    Specifically where it says:
    *If I install and run four additional copies of the operating system, do I have to use Windows 7 Enterprise as the host operating system?
    No. You may use prior versions of Windows

    Yes. So you are saying buy 10, get VL on 10, find 7 media, install 7 under downgrade rights. Then install XP Mode on 7?



  • Something to keep in mind, Windows 7 downgrade rights are gone in under three years. Windows 7 systems installed via 10 will need to be updated at that point. Downgrade rights have a limited time span.



  • @Carnival-Boy said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    I know. But you don't get additional rights to install VMs on the client? I'm looking a document like this for clarification:
    https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/simonmay/2011/01/13/windows-7-licensing-and-virtual-machines-clarified/

    Specifically where it says:
    *If I install and run four additional copies of the operating system, do I have to use Windows 7 Enterprise as the host operating system?
    No. You may use prior versions of Windows

    Prior is 7, 8, 8.1 in this case.



  • @scottalanmiller said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    Yes. So you are saying buy 10, get VL on 10, find 7 media, install 7 under downgrade rights. Then install XP Mode on 7?

    I'd prefer to just install an XP VM under 10, but XP mode under a 7 VM would also work for me. Anything to get a legal copy of XP running, really.



  • @Carnival-Boy said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    @scottalanmiller said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    Yes. So you are saying buy 10, get VL on 10, find 7 media, install 7 under downgrade rights. Then install XP Mode on 7?

    I'd prefer to just install an XP VM under 10, but XP mode under a 7 VM would also work for me. Anything to get a legal copy of XP running, really.

    XP itself has no legal means to install as it itself is off of the market for many years. Downgrade rights won't get it. But downgrade to 7 and then XP Mode in a VM and then VDI on another machine seems like it could work.



  • Or old XP retail licenses on eBay of course.



  • @scottalanmiller said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    Windows 7 systems installed via 10 will need to be updated at that point. Downgrade rights have a limited time span.

    That I didn't know. HP are still selling current computers with Windows 7 pre-installed, which I think is crazy.



  • @Carnival-Boy said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    @scottalanmiller said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    Windows 7 systems installed via 10 will need to be updated at that point. Downgrade rights have a limited time span.

    That I didn't know. HP are still selling current computers with Windows 7 pre-installed, which I think is crazy.

    That is pretty crazy. But so many people ask for it, must be in demand.



  • I support a metal fabrication shop. They have machines that run on XP, Windows 2000 that do all sorts of metal work. Punching, bending, welding, etc. They were taking designs from a Workstation in the office then walking them to the metal working machine and using a USB drive to transfer all the different types of designs they would make. It was so old it couldn't work with Window shares on the new computers in the office. I was able to get it to work with a Samba share from a CentOS linux server though. They were very please with that.



  • @scottalanmiller said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    @Carnival-Boy said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    @scottalanmiller said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    Windows 7 systems installed via 10 will need to be updated at that point. Downgrade rights have a limited time span.

    That I didn't know. HP are still selling current computers with Windows 7 pre-installed, which I think is crazy.

    That is pretty crazy. But so many people ask for it, must be in demand.

    As crazy as it is, if you have a Windows 7 license, you can downgrade that machine to XP directly as well.



  • I'm not sure. Is it a full Win 7 licence? It's listed as "Windows 7 Professional 64 (available through downgrade rights from Windows 10 Pro 64)" To me that implies it isn't a normal Windows 7 licence and therefore doesn't include downgrade rights to XP.



  • @Carnival-Boy said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    I'm not sure. Is it a full Win 7 licence? It's listed as "Windows 7 Professional 64 (available through downgrade rights from Windows 10 Pro 64)" To me that implies it isn't a normal Windows 7 licence and therefore doesn't include downgrade rights to XP.

    In that case, no, it's a Windows 10 license where Windows 7 has been allowed through downgrade rights (though technically Windows 7 wouldn't qualify under the 2 previous versions rule since 8 and 8.1 are two different OSes), eh, but who's counting? I'm sure MS approved the use of Win 7 in this case.

    😉



  • @Dashrender said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    @scottalanmiller said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    @Carnival-Boy said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    @scottalanmiller said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    Windows 7 systems installed via 10 will need to be updated at that point. Downgrade rights have a limited time span.

    That I didn't know. HP are still selling current computers with Windows 7 pre-installed, which I think is crazy.

    That is pretty crazy. But so many people ask for it, must be in demand.

    As crazy as it is, if you have a Windows 7 license, you can downgrade that machine to XP directly as well.

    But he doesn't have a Windows 7 license, he has a Windows 10 license.



  • @Dashrender said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    @Carnival-Boy said in XP Mode on Windows 10:

    I'm not sure. Is it a full Win 7 licence? It's listed as "Windows 7 Professional 64 (available through downgrade rights from Windows 10 Pro 64)" To me that implies it isn't a normal Windows 7 licence and therefore doesn't include downgrade rights to XP.

    In that case, no, it's a Windows 10 license where Windows 7 has been allowed through downgrade rights (though technically Windows 7 wouldn't qualify under the 2 previous versions rule since 8 and 8.1 are two different OSes), eh, but who's counting? I'm sure MS approved the use of Win 7 in this case.

    😉

    They have, until Jan, 2020 (which sounds far off, but is less than three years.)


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