RedHat on AWS



  • First post on here and I'm 100% sure it is asked over and over again.
    But I'm lazy today and just looking for some guide lines or direction.
    I work in a small IT repair shop and have a lot of down time so I figured I was start playing around in AWS. I'm looking to learn about that and redhat or any form of linux. I have Windows server and lots of networking but rather newish to the linux server-side.
    Anyone can help me out with something to start with?
    I have a redhat server up and running..but what to install I'm not sure...Squid or something like AD, DNS, DHCP, etc...
    Thanks and sorry for the repeated question. I know I found a write up by SAM at one point but having a hard time finding it today
    Thanks
    M



  • This may be what you were looking for.

    It's a lot to read, and welcome to the community.



  • Here is the table of contents of Scott's guide.

    https://mangolassi.it/topic/7825/sam-learning-linux-system-administration



  • Thanks for the link. I was just looking for something practical and useful. Now time to get to work



  • Just be careful with AWS, costs can add up in a hurry.



  • @coliver said in RedHat on AWS:

    Just be careful with AWS, costs can add up in a hurry.

    Yeah a lot of people here for those kind of testing purposes would use of the fine sponsors you see, such a DigitalOcean or Vultr.



  • @BRRABill said in RedHat on AWS:

    @coliver said in RedHat on AWS:

    Just be careful with AWS, costs can add up in a hurry.

    Yeah a lot of people here for those kind of testing purposes would use of the fine sponsors you see, such a DigitalOcean or Vultr.

    I agree, not just because they are sponsors, but because unless it is AWS (which isn't very applicable in the SMB) specifically that you want to learn then using it will be unnecessarily complex and the time will be wasted learning AWS instead of whatever else the goal is to learn.



  • @linuxspark said in RedHat on AWS:

    First post on here and I'm 100% sure it is asked over and over again.

    Welcome to posting 🙂



  • @linuxspark said in RedHat on AWS:

    but what to install I'm not sure...Squid or something like AD, DNS, DHCP, etc...

    Yes, tons of things. Don't just do one workload. Do loads of them. Gobs of them. Anything you can find a use for and somethings that you can't.



  • Thanks guys. Now I'm a bit worried on getting hit with a large bill from AWS. We have some old hardware laying around that I can make some use of and don't have to worry about a bill. I'm just going to start diving in. Most of the businesses we deal with are Small sized so AWS maybe overkill. I'm comfortable with the GUI in Ubuntu/LinuxMint. Just haven't branched to deep into server side of linux other than running Nagios. Ruby on Rails but that was a while ago.



  • @linuxspark said in RedHat on AWS:

    Thanks guys. Now I'm a bit worried on getting hit with a large bill from AWS.

    Just don't spin up more than you can afford. AWS is all about auto-scaling workloads. If you make a system auto-scale to hundreds of nodes, that's going to cost a fortune. If you don't do that... what are you learning?



  • @linuxspark said in RedHat on AWS:

    We have some old hardware laying around that I can make some use of and don't have to worry about a bill. I'm just going to start diving in.

    What's the goal to learn? If you want to learn cloud, that won't really help. If you want to learn Linux, that will work far better.



  • I'm a big fan for having on-site hardware to tinker with. After you get comfy with one hypervisor, it's time to move to the next. 😎



  • @linuxspark said in RedHat on AWS:

    Most of the businesses we deal with are Small sized so AWS maybe overkill.

    Not "overkill" but fundamentally the wrong technology. If you want hosted systems for the SMB market, you work with Vultr, Digital Ocean, Linode and maybe Rackspace. Not AWS or Azure.



  • @linuxspark said in RedHat on AWS:

    I'm comfortable with the GUI in Ubuntu/LinuxMint. Just haven't branched to deep into server side of linux other than running Nagios. Ruby on Rails but that was a while ago.

    Ah, if you want to learn Linux, AWS would be terrible. Get XenServer and/or KVM on that spare hardware and start building all kinds of Linux machines.

    Start with CentOS, then Suse and Ubuntu. Those three are your only realistic server options in the Linux world. CentOS rules the roost, start there.

    Install no GUIs, those aren't allowed on Linux servers (I don't allow them on Windows servers, either 😉



  • Cloud based I have some experience. Mostly setting up Site to Site with Cisco ASA 5525X to Azure along with some Store simple but I'm working for a small company now so I'm wearing a different hat. Lot's of unmanaged switches so my Networking rule isn't a big factor. Windows server, Hyper-V, and ESXi I'm comfortable with. Just looking to branch out a bit into the Linux world and different Hypervisors.
    Sounds like I will jump into XenServer and run some Linux machines.
    No GUI's sound crazy but I think I can manage without it 🙂
    Maybe run apache and try to build a domain/ldap to start with.



  • Command line management of Linux is actually super simple. I can't even figure out how to use a GUI most of the time 🙂


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