.com, .co, or .net?



  • I think I would like to use .com if I can find an available domain name that I like. The problem is the .com names are becoming increasingly hard to find. I dont know if its better to use a shrother .co or .net domain name or go for a longer .com domain name.



  • Lots of factors to consider. Obviously NTG went for .co because we wanted really short. ntg.co - just five letters. We also got our Columbian domain in the first fifteen minutes of it being open for US buyers. We had staff up in the middle of the night to start bidding on domain names. We had a standing bid for niagara.co that we lost. Although really, we are pretty happy with ntg.co. What really sucks, though, is whoever got that domain never used it and just abandoned it. Jerks.

    We own .net addresses as well but we generally don't use them.



  • @scottalanmiller does seo treat you any differently?



  • @IRJ said:

    @scottalanmiller does seo treat you any differently?

    Don't believe so. It definitely should not, that would be a real scandal if Google and others were punishing non-American domains.



  • A question we always ask our clients: is the .com in the same business as your business? If so, don't use that domain name regardless of the extension.



  • .net domains were for ISPs and networking providers, so depending on your business, they may or may not be a good choice. There's always the country-specific TLDs, such as .us.



  • @alexntg said:

    .net domains were for ISPs and networking providers, so depending on your business, they may or may not be a good choice. There's always the country-specific TLDs, such as .us.

    That used to be the case, but certainly isn't any more.
    My office went with a .net for email (I have no idea why - I wasn't around when that decision was made).



  • We used .us because both .com and .net weren't available and no one would confuse our business with that .com or .net domain name.



  • @Dashrender said:

    @alexntg said:

    .net domains were for ISPs and networking providers, so depending on your business, they may or may not be a good choice. There's always the country-specific TLDs, such as .us.

    That used to be the case, but certainly isn't any more.
    My office went with a .net for email (I have no idea why - I wasn't around when that decision was made).

    Still is the case. Just widely abused. It you use a .net inappropriately it reflects poorly on the company - makes the look confused.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    @Dashrender said:

    @alexntg said:

    .net domains were for ISPs and networking providers, so depending on your business, they may or may not be a good choice. There's always the country-specific TLDs, such as .us.

    That used to be the case, but certainly isn't any more.
    My office went with a .net for email (I have no idea why - I wasn't around when that decision was made).

    Still is the case. Just widely abused. It you use a .net inappropriately it reflects poorly on the company - makes the look confused.

    Much like this is an Italian website.



  • I havent named anything yet, so I could tailor the name of the business to the domain. I think I am going to throw a few names out there and find a .com name that isnt taken.



  • How do you feel about spelling Tech as Tek in the business name? I was thinking of a business name using tech but all domains are taken. I found that using the business name with tek in it it, shows an available .com domain.



  • @IRJ said:

    How do you feel about spelling Tech as Tek in the business name? I was thinking of a business name using tech but all domains are taken. I found that using the business name with tek in it it, shows an available .com domain.

    That is really personal preference. There are popular sites out there, such as tek-tips.com, but to me it ranks up there with textspeak in a negative fashion. irjtech.com is available.



  • You have to spend your life telling people on the phone "the domain is abc-tek.com, that's tek with a 'k' not a 'ch'", which will confuse people and 25% of your customers will still e-mail you using abc-tech.com and will wonder why you never reply to them.

    Bad idea IMV.

    I only really like .com domain names. Anything else is just a little less classy.

    UK companies have also been using .co.uk, but now Nominet are selling .uk domains, meaning every British company with an existing .co.uk domain will now have to spend more money registering a .uk domain as well. A typical money-making scam by Nominet and a complete waste of time. I hate .co, .london, .xxx, .me and all the rest!



  • Tek was bugging me, but I couldn't recall why. Found it!

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TekWar



  • @alexntg said:

    Much like this is an Italian website.

    But a business one, not something else.

    .it is sold by Italy, who owns it, to external countries for use as a general commercial / IT business designation. It is Italy’s choice how it is to be used and Italy chooses that that is what it means. Just as Columbia sells .co outside of Columbia for general commercial purpose. So that is what those mean. Those countries have decided to not have those TLDs represent their nations (it is redundant for Italy with .eu anyway, which is strict.) The US owns .net and decides its purpose and designation. And while it does not police the use of .net, it does designate it.



  • I trust Mangolassi users and I am trying to find a domain name for Atlantic Tech, Atlantic Technology Group, Atlantic Tech Solutions, or something similiar



  • I havent decided anything on the name except that I really like Atlantic



  • So you're still working on a company name? Atlantic Tech's already in use: http://www.atlantictechnology.com - when you're creating a company, come up with something unique. That way, you can avoid trademark/IP infringement issues down the road.



  • @IRJ said:

    I trust Mangolassi users and I am trying to find a domain name for Atlantic Tech, Atlantic Technology Group, Atlantic Tech Solutions, or something similiar

    I've worked with businesses at that stage a lot. Start with available domain names and work backwards.



  • @alexntg said:

    So you're still working on a company name? Atlantic Tech's already in use: http://www.atlantictechnology.com - when you're creating a company, come up with something unique. That way, you can avoid trademark/IP infringement issues down the road.

    The sell entertainment systems and you can see that right away when you go to their website. Finding a unique name is tough.



  • @IRJ Atlantic is very heavily used. We used Niagara and surprisingly it was unused. But then again we grabbed it in 2000 and it turns out that no one outside of New York can spell it.



  • @IRJ said:

    @alexntg said:

    So you're still working on a company name? Atlantic Tech's already in use: http://www.atlantictechnology.com - when you're creating a company, come up with something unique. That way, you can avoid trademark/IP infringement issues down the road.

    The sell entertainment systems and you can see that right away when you go to their website. Finding a unique name is tough.

    IRJ Tech? IRJ Systems? irj.biz is available. IRJ Enterprises? irj.enterprises is available.



  • .biz has negative connotations. It early on became associated with weird stuff.



  • @scottalanmiller said:

    .biz has negative connotations. It early on became associated with weird stuff.

    weirder than the xxx domains?



  • Something to keep in mind. In California at least, using your last name means you don't need to register a fictitious business name (e.g. Radon Consulting). Other states have different requirements. You may still want to register it regardless.

    http://blogs.findlaw.com/free_enterprise/2010/06/what-is-a-fictitious-business-name.html



  • @Dashrender said:

    @scottalanmiller said:

    .biz has negative connotations. It early on became associated with weird stuff.

    weirder than the xxx domains?

    Similar. Mostly scams though.



  • @ITcrackerjack said:

    Something to keep in mind. In California at least, using your last name means you don't need to register a fictitious business name (e.g. Radon Consulting). Other states have different requirements. You may still want to register it regardless.

    http://blogs.findlaw.com/free_enterprise/2010/06/what-is-a-fictitious-business-name.html

    Is that true for real businesses or just people acting as businesses?



  • From what I read that only helps if you don't plan to form a company but only if you are planning to DBA yourself which you should never, ever do.



  • @alexntg said:

    @IRJ said:

    @alexntg said:

    So you're still working on a company name? Atlantic Tech's already in use: http://www.atlantictechnology.com - when you're creating a company, come up with something unique. That way, you can avoid trademark/IP infringement issues down the road.

    The sell entertainment systems and you can see that right away when you go to their website. Finding a unique name is tough.

    IRJ Tech? IRJ Systems? irj.biz is available. IRJ Enterprises? irj.enterprises is available.

    IRJ stands for Indian River Joel. While that is great for a fishing business. Not so much for a tech business.


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