WD Blue PC SSD



  • WD has kind of recently came out with their WD Blue SSD line:

    https://www.wdc.com/products/solid-state-drives/wd-blue-ssd.html

    My question is: Who makes them?

    Does WD have their own factories? Is SanDisk making them? Does SanDisk buy them cheap somewhere, and rebrand them, and then WD re-rebrands them?

    I can't find this info anywhere.

    Thanks!



  • low endurance, must be TLC

    should be fine for a regular joe use case

    https://www.wdc.com/content/dam/wdc/website/downloadable_assets/eng/spec_data_sheet/2879-800079.pdf



  • I'd be shocked if WD has their own chip foundry, but would not be surprised if WD is sourcing the memory chips and then building the rest as they know drives and firmware and caching well.



  • I guess what I'm getting at, is do we consider them A-level drives or B-level? I know they have the 3-year warranty with them like the wd blue spinners.... but do we treat them with the same respect?


  • Banned

    Western Digital Bought SanDisk, hence the WD SSDs



  • @Tim_G said in WD Blue PC SSD:

    I guess what I'm getting at, is do we consider them A-level drives or B-level? I know they have the 3-year warranty with them like the wd blue spinners.... but do we treat them with the same respect?

    I would probably stick to Samsung EVO or Kingston for SATA and Intel 600p for entry level M2.

    As said before, WD Blue SSD isn't a new product, but I would still wait a bit.



  • Most surprising; you can order direct from wdc.com 1 SSD.



  • @Jason said in WD Blue PC SSD:

    Western Digital Bought SanDisk, hence the WD SSDs

    Yes I know this, but I thought SanDisk was rebranding their SSDs?



  • @thwr said in WD Blue PC SSD:

    @Tim_G said in WD Blue PC SSD:

    I guess what I'm getting at, is do we consider them A-level drives or B-level? I know they have the 3-year warranty with them like the wd blue spinners.... but do we treat them with the same respect?

    I would probably stick to Samsung EVO or Kingston for SATA and Intel 600p for entry level M2.

    As said before, WD Blue SSD isn't a new product, but I would still wait a bit.

    I'm strictly talking consumer-based and desktop/laptop/client-based. Nothing to do with servers. Nothing to do with anything really for that matter...

    I'm just wanting to know if WD builds their SSDs or are they rebranded? If you say rebranded from SanDisk, then does SanDisk make them? Because I thought SanDisk was rebranding them anyways?

    I have no idea.





  • @Tim_G said in WD Blue PC SSD:

    @thwr said in WD Blue PC SSD:

    @Tim_G said in WD Blue PC SSD:

    I guess what I'm getting at, is do we consider them A-level drives or B-level? I know they have the 3-year warranty with them like the wd blue spinners.... but do we treat them with the same respect?

    I would probably stick to Samsung EVO or Kingston for SATA and Intel 600p for entry level M2.

    As said before, WD Blue SSD isn't a new product, but I would still wait a bit.

    I'm strictly talking consumer-based and desktop/laptop/client-based. Nothing to do with servers. Nothing to do with anything really for that matter...

    Sure, all the drives mentioned above are relatively cheap but quality consumer products. The list does not answer your question, but it offers you an (way better) alternative.

    I'm just wanting to know if WD builds their SSDs or are they rebranded? If you say rebranded from SanDisk, then does SanDisk make them? Because I thought SanDisk was rebranding them anyways?

    Couldn't find a good English source, but this German Golem article explains that WD blue is based on planar 15nm TLC cells from Flash Forward (joint venture: Toshiba & WD) and uses a Marvell controller. This combination isn't new, just take a look at the SanDisk X400.

    It looks like the WD Green SSD uses the same cells, but another controller from Silicon Motion which does not even have a cache, making it a poor choice in most cases.

    So yes, it's just rebranded with a slightly modified firmware.



  • @thwr said in WD Blue PC SSD:

    Couldn't find a good English source, but this German Golem article explains that WD blue is based on planar 15nm TLC cells from Flash Forward (joint venture: Toshiba & WD) and uses a Marvell controller. This combination isn't new, just take a look at the SanDisk X400.

    It looks like the WD Green SSD uses the same cells, but another controller from Silicon Motion which does not even have a cache, making it a poor choice in most cases.

    So yes, it's just rebranded with a slightly modified firmware.

    I think this pretty much answers my question. Thanks!



  • @Tim_G said in WD Blue PC SSD:

    @thwr said in WD Blue PC SSD:

    Couldn't find a good English source, but this German Golem article explains that WD blue is based on planar 15nm TLC cells from Flash Forward (joint venture: Toshiba & WD) and uses a Marvell controller. This combination isn't new, just take a look at the SanDisk X400.

    It looks like the WD Green SSD uses the same cells, but another controller from Silicon Motion which does not even have a cache, making it a poor choice in most cases.

    So yes, it's just rebranded with a slightly modified firmware.

    I think this pretty much answers my question. Thanks!

    My pleasure


Log in to reply