Google Pixel Phone



  • A dead pixel issue is no longer exclusive to the LCD panel.

    El Reg:

    At an event this morning in San Francisco, the web advertising giant took a huge leap into hardware with a range of new products aimed at taking on, and beating, the most popular consumer products on the market.
     
    Top of the list: the Google Pixel phone, which is aimed squarely at the iPhone. Literally – it looks exactly like an iPhone. A very early review: if imitating Apple was the goal, Google may have pulled it off perfectly.

    IT News:

    Google has debuted a refreshed range of hardware, including two new smartphones that no longer carry the Nexus moniker, virtual reality goggles, a voice-controlled Home digital assistant device, and a wi-fi router.
     
    Two new phones, the 5in Pixel and 5.5in Pixel XL, are available for US$650 (A$852) and US$870 (A$1142) in the US on pre-order.
     
    Australian pricing starts at A$1079 for the 5in model and A$1269 for the 5.5in Pixel XL.
     
    The phones are made by Taiwan's HTC. They are encased in metal, with Corning Gorilla Glass 4 coated screens, and are powered by Qualcomm's Snapdragon 821 system-on-a-chip with a quad-core processor, with 4GB of memory and 32 or 128GB of storage.

    Complimentary sauces:
    http://www.itnews.com.au/news/google-takes-aim-at-apple-with-new-phones-and-devices-438711
    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/10/04/google_pixel_phone/

    Full Specs: http://www.gsmarena.com/google_pixel-8346.php



  • @nadnerB said in Google Pixel Phone:

    A dead pixel issue is no longer exclusive to the LCD panel.

    El Reg:

    At an event this morning in San Francisco, the web advertising giant took a huge leap into hardware with a range of new products aimed at taking on, and beating, the most popular consumer products on the market.
     
    Top of the list: the Google Pixel phone, which is aimed squarely at the iPhone. Literally – it looks exactly like an iPhone. A very early review: if imitating Apple was the goal, Google may have pulled it off perfectly.

    So now if you wanted an iPhone that isn't an iPhone you can buy the non-iPhone iPhone. Just what I've always wanted.



  • As close to iPhone as you can get without technically being an iPhone.



  • The best clone on the market, almost as good as the real thing.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    The best clone on the market, almost as good as the real thing.

    What I don't get is why they're copying the most stagnant platform on the market. Apple hasn't done any real innovation in a long time. Features the iPhone is just now getting in iOS X have been on the other platforms for a long time.



  • @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    The best clone on the market, almost as good as the real thing.

    What I don't get is why they're copying the most stagnant platform on the market. Apple hasn't done any real innovation in a long time. Features the iPhone is just now getting in iOS X have been on the other platforms for a long time.

    Maybe because the market has loved the design from the beginning and now Google realizes that you don't need to change to be good. Who needs new phone features every year? No me, I just want one that works really well. You can call iPhone stagnant, but I felt that it worked better than Android four years ago when I switched and I feel it is better now. Android may have flailed in the meantime, but change for the sake of change isn't good. You need improvement.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    The best clone on the market, almost as good as the real thing.

    What I don't get is why they're copying the most stagnant platform on the market. Apple hasn't done any real innovation in a long time. Features the iPhone is just now getting in iOS X have been on the other platforms for a long time.

    Maybe because the market has loved the design from the beginning and now Google realizes that you don't need to change to be good. Who needs new phone features every year? No me, I just want one that works really well. You can call iPhone stagnant, but I felt that it worked better than Android four years ago when I switched and I feel it is better now. Android may have flailed in the meantime, but change for the sake of change isn't good. You need improvement.

    If you only copy the market leader then you are forgoing any differentiation that might allow you to compete. If someone offers me a Dr. Pepper vs a Mr. Pibb I will always take the Dr. Pepper even for slightly more. The same holds true in this case. With little/no differentiation the only market is the "never iPhone" group.



  • @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    The best clone on the market, almost as good as the real thing.

    What I don't get is why they're copying the most stagnant platform on the market. Apple hasn't done any real innovation in a long time. Features the iPhone is just now getting in iOS X have been on the other platforms for a long time.

    Maybe because the market has loved the design from the beginning and now Google realizes that you don't need to change to be good. Who needs new phone features every year? No me, I just want one that works really well. You can call iPhone stagnant, but I felt that it worked better than Android four years ago when I switched and I feel it is better now. Android may have flailed in the meantime, but change for the sake of change isn't good. You need improvement.

    If you only copy the market leader then you are forgoing any differentiation that might allow you to compete. If someone offers me a Dr. Pepper vs a Mr. Pibb I will always take the Dr. Pepper even for slightly more. The same holds true in this case. With little/no differentiation the only market is the "never iPhone" group.

    That's the thing, though, they do a ton of stuff. It is just the one, singular product that is copying the leader. It's just rounding out a portfolio, not replacing one.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    The best clone on the market, almost as good as the real thing.

    What I don't get is why they're copying the most stagnant platform on the market. Apple hasn't done any real innovation in a long time. Features the iPhone is just now getting in iOS X have been on the other platforms for a long time.

    Maybe because the market has loved the design from the beginning and now Google realizes that you don't need to change to be good. Who needs new phone features every year? No me, I just want one that works really well. You can call iPhone stagnant, but I felt that it worked better than Android four years ago when I switched and I feel it is better now. Android may have flailed in the meantime, but change for the sake of change isn't good. You need improvement.

    If you only copy the market leader then you are forgoing any differentiation that might allow you to compete. If someone offers me a Dr. Pepper vs a Mr. Pibb I will always take the Dr. Pepper even for slightly more. The same holds true in this case. With little/no differentiation the only market is the "never iPhone" group.

    That's the thing, though, they do a ton of stuff. It is just the one, singular product that is copying the leader. It's just rounding out a portfolio, not replacing one.

    I'm not sure what you're getting at here. The intersection of competition between Google and Apple is their smartphone. This is Google's phone since they're no longer producing Nexus devices. Sure Google has a large portfolio, and as a larger strategy it might not be critical, but at this point of competition it makes no sense to me.



  • @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    The best clone on the market, almost as good as the real thing.

    What I don't get is why they're copying the most stagnant platform on the market. Apple hasn't done any real innovation in a long time. Features the iPhone is just now getting in iOS X have been on the other platforms for a long time.

    Maybe because the market has loved the design from the beginning and now Google realizes that you don't need to change to be good. Who needs new phone features every year? No me, I just want one that works really well. You can call iPhone stagnant, but I felt that it worked better than Android four years ago when I switched and I feel it is better now. Android may have flailed in the meantime, but change for the sake of change isn't good. You need improvement.

    If you only copy the market leader then you are forgoing any differentiation that might allow you to compete. If someone offers me a Dr. Pepper vs a Mr. Pibb I will always take the Dr. Pepper even for slightly more. The same holds true in this case. With little/no differentiation the only market is the "never iPhone" group.

    Google also doesn't need to innovate. They have an huge open source community and many 3rd party vendors that are innovating for them. They are going to pull features from those vendors when they look to be stable enough to use. I'm in the "never iPhone" group so this phone doesn't really appeal to me... but, I think, it will have a bigger market then most people are expecting.



  • @coliver said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    The best clone on the market, almost as good as the real thing.

    What I don't get is why they're copying the most stagnant platform on the market. Apple hasn't done any real innovation in a long time. Features the iPhone is just now getting in iOS X have been on the other platforms for a long time.

    Maybe because the market has loved the design from the beginning and now Google realizes that you don't need to change to be good. Who needs new phone features every year? No me, I just want one that works really well. You can call iPhone stagnant, but I felt that it worked better than Android four years ago when I switched and I feel it is better now. Android may have flailed in the meantime, but change for the sake of change isn't good. You need improvement.

    If you only copy the market leader then you are forgoing any differentiation that might allow you to compete. If someone offers me a Dr. Pepper vs a Mr. Pibb I will always take the Dr. Pepper even for slightly more. The same holds true in this case. With little/no differentiation the only market is the "never iPhone" group.

    Google also doesn't need to innovate. They have an huge open source community and many 3rd party vendors that are innovating for them. They are going to pull features from those vendors when they look to be stable enough to use. I'm in the "never iPhone" group so this phone doesn't really appeal to me... but, I think, it will have a bigger market then most people are expecting.

    I'm not necessarily dissing the phone, but the strategy. Merely copying the iPhone doesn't seem like enough to move the market. Makes me wonder if they're just trying do a proof of concept strategy rather than a truly competitive action.



  • @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @coliver said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    The best clone on the market, almost as good as the real thing.

    What I don't get is why they're copying the most stagnant platform on the market. Apple hasn't done any real innovation in a long time. Features the iPhone is just now getting in iOS X have been on the other platforms for a long time.

    Maybe because the market has loved the design from the beginning and now Google realizes that you don't need to change to be good. Who needs new phone features every year? No me, I just want one that works really well. You can call iPhone stagnant, but I felt that it worked better than Android four years ago when I switched and I feel it is better now. Android may have flailed in the meantime, but change for the sake of change isn't good. You need improvement.

    If you only copy the market leader then you are forgoing any differentiation that might allow you to compete. If someone offers me a Dr. Pepper vs a Mr. Pibb I will always take the Dr. Pepper even for slightly more. The same holds true in this case. With little/no differentiation the only market is the "never iPhone" group.

    Google also doesn't need to innovate. They have an huge open source community and many 3rd party vendors that are innovating for them. They are going to pull features from those vendors when they look to be stable enough to use. I'm in the "never iPhone" group so this phone doesn't really appeal to me... but, I think, it will have a bigger market then most people are expecting.

    I'm not necessarily dissing the phone, but the strategy. Merely copying the iPhone doesn't seem like enough to move the market. Makes me wonder if they're just trying do a proof of concept strategy rather than a truly competitive action.

    Is that true? It seems like Android is already a market leader and now Google is trying their best to polish the experience. This is going to take over the Nexus line. This is the reference phone that all the other manufactures will have to compete with and improve on. It's also, thankfully, still an Android device just with a traditional form factor that has been well received by the masses.



  • @coliver said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @coliver said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    The best clone on the market, almost as good as the real thing.

    What I don't get is why they're copying the most stagnant platform on the market. Apple hasn't done any real innovation in a long time. Features the iPhone is just now getting in iOS X have been on the other platforms for a long time.

    Maybe because the market has loved the design from the beginning and now Google realizes that you don't need to change to be good. Who needs new phone features every year? No me, I just want one that works really well. You can call iPhone stagnant, but I felt that it worked better than Android four years ago when I switched and I feel it is better now. Android may have flailed in the meantime, but change for the sake of change isn't good. You need improvement.

    If you only copy the market leader then you are forgoing any differentiation that might allow you to compete. If someone offers me a Dr. Pepper vs a Mr. Pibb I will always take the Dr. Pepper even for slightly more. The same holds true in this case. With little/no differentiation the only market is the "never iPhone" group.

    Google also doesn't need to innovate. They have an huge open source community and many 3rd party vendors that are innovating for them. They are going to pull features from those vendors when they look to be stable enough to use. I'm in the "never iPhone" group so this phone doesn't really appeal to me... but, I think, it will have a bigger market then most people are expecting.

    I'm not necessarily dissing the phone, but the strategy. Merely copying the iPhone doesn't seem like enough to move the market. Makes me wonder if they're just trying do a proof of concept strategy rather than a truly competitive action.

    Is that true? It seems like Android is already a market leader and now Google is trying their best to polish the experience. This is going to take over the Nexus line. This is the reference phone that all the other manufactures will have to compete with and improve on. It's also, thankfully, still an Android device just with a traditional form factor that has been well received by the masses.

    Android is the overall leader, iPhone is the single device leader.



  • @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    The best clone on the market, almost as good as the real thing.

    What I don't get is why they're copying the most stagnant platform on the market. Apple hasn't done any real innovation in a long time. Features the iPhone is just now getting in iOS X have been on the other platforms for a long time.

    Maybe because the market has loved the design from the beginning and now Google realizes that you don't need to change to be good. Who needs new phone features every year? No me, I just want one that works really well. You can call iPhone stagnant, but I felt that it worked better than Android four years ago when I switched and I feel it is better now. Android may have flailed in the meantime, but change for the sake of change isn't good. You need improvement.

    If you only copy the market leader then you are forgoing any differentiation that might allow you to compete. If someone offers me a Dr. Pepper vs a Mr. Pibb I will always take the Dr. Pepper even for slightly more. The same holds true in this case. With little/no differentiation the only market is the "never iPhone" group.

    That's the thing, though, they do a ton of stuff. It is just the one, singular product that is copying the leader. It's just rounding out a portfolio, not replacing one.

    I'm not sure what you're getting at here. The intersection of competition between Google and Apple is their smartphone. This is Google's phone since they're no longer producing Nexus devices. Sure Google has a large portfolio, and as a larger strategy it might not be critical, but at this point of competition it makes no sense to me.

    Ah, well if you think of Google as phone maker, sure. But I don't. I think of them as a mobile platform maker - they make Android to compete with iOS. The making of Pixel is not to compete Google vs. Apple, but to make sure that the Android market doesn't have a gap in that space, which it did.



  • I guess I'm lost on the it's an iPhone, it's not an iPhone schtick.

    The form factors for these things are so limited in what is really the ultimate in design, so the fact that they all look the same is not surprising at all.

    As for innovation - I guess I don't need constant innovation, I just want improvements, mainly in two areas. Speed and stability. A third area would be security.

    I do see Google's phones as nothing more than a reference by which other manufacturers will be judged and hopefully make better devices. Samsung has clearly been doing this, but at the expense of having all of the Samsung crapware on them (does Samsung actually make money from that crapware? do people use it enough to justify Samsung making it?)

    I no longer care about Android vs iOS, use whatever you like, just use an open platform to do your syncing so you're not stuck in a single environment.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    The best clone on the market, almost as good as the real thing.

    What I don't get is why they're copying the most stagnant platform on the market. Apple hasn't done any real innovation in a long time. Features the iPhone is just now getting in iOS X have been on the other platforms for a long time.

    Maybe because the market has loved the design from the beginning and now Google realizes that you don't need to change to be good. Who needs new phone features every year? No me, I just want one that works really well. You can call iPhone stagnant, but I felt that it worked better than Android four years ago when I switched and I feel it is better now. Android may have flailed in the meantime, but change for the sake of change isn't good. You need improvement.

    If you only copy the market leader then you are forgoing any differentiation that might allow you to compete. If someone offers me a Dr. Pepper vs a Mr. Pibb I will always take the Dr. Pepper even for slightly more. The same holds true in this case. With little/no differentiation the only market is the "never iPhone" group.

    That's the thing, though, they do a ton of stuff. It is just the one, singular product that is copying the leader. It's just rounding out a portfolio, not replacing one.

    I'm not sure what you're getting at here. The intersection of competition between Google and Apple is their smartphone. This is Google's phone since they're no longer producing Nexus devices. Sure Google has a large portfolio, and as a larger strategy it might not be critical, but at this point of competition it makes no sense to me.

    Ah, well if you think of Google as phone maker, sure. But I don't. I think of them as a mobile platform maker - they make Android to compete with iOS. The making of Pixel is not to compete Google vs. Apple, but to make sure that the Android market doesn't have a gap in that space, which it did.

    What gap did Android have that was filled by the Samsung S7/Note 7?



  • At the end of the day... same crap, different bucket.



  • @Dashrender said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    The best clone on the market, almost as good as the real thing.

    What I don't get is why they're copying the most stagnant platform on the market. Apple hasn't done any real innovation in a long time. Features the iPhone is just now getting in iOS X have been on the other platforms for a long time.

    Maybe because the market has loved the design from the beginning and now Google realizes that you don't need to change to be good. Who needs new phone features every year? No me, I just want one that works really well. You can call iPhone stagnant, but I felt that it worked better than Android four years ago when I switched and I feel it is better now. Android may have flailed in the meantime, but change for the sake of change isn't good. You need improvement.

    If you only copy the market leader then you are forgoing any differentiation that might allow you to compete. If someone offers me a Dr. Pepper vs a Mr. Pibb I will always take the Dr. Pepper even for slightly more. The same holds true in this case. With little/no differentiation the only market is the "never iPhone" group.

    That's the thing, though, they do a ton of stuff. It is just the one, singular product that is copying the leader. It's just rounding out a portfolio, not replacing one.

    I'm not sure what you're getting at here. The intersection of competition between Google and Apple is their smartphone. This is Google's phone since they're no longer producing Nexus devices. Sure Google has a large portfolio, and as a larger strategy it might not be critical, but at this point of competition it makes no sense to me.

    Ah, well if you think of Google as phone maker, sure. But I don't. I think of them as a mobile platform maker - they make Android to compete with iOS. The making of Pixel is not to compete Google vs. Apple, but to make sure that the Android market doesn't have a gap in that space, which it did.

    What gap did Android have that was filled by the Samsung S7/Note 7?

    I don't understand the question. What does Samsung or Samsung's phones have to do with the conversation?



  • @Dashrender said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    The best clone on the market, almost as good as the real thing.

    What I don't get is why they're copying the most stagnant platform on the market. Apple hasn't done any real innovation in a long time. Features the iPhone is just now getting in iOS X have been on the other platforms for a long time.

    Maybe because the market has loved the design from the beginning and now Google realizes that you don't need to change to be good. Who needs new phone features every year? No me, I just want one that works really well. You can call iPhone stagnant, but I felt that it worked better than Android four years ago when I switched and I feel it is better now. Android may have flailed in the meantime, but change for the sake of change isn't good. You need improvement.

    If you only copy the market leader then you are forgoing any differentiation that might allow you to compete. If someone offers me a Dr. Pepper vs a Mr. Pibb I will always take the Dr. Pepper even for slightly more. The same holds true in this case. With little/no differentiation the only market is the "never iPhone" group.

    That's the thing, though, they do a ton of stuff. It is just the one, singular product that is copying the leader. It's just rounding out a portfolio, not replacing one.

    I'm not sure what you're getting at here. The intersection of competition between Google and Apple is their smartphone. This is Google's phone since they're no longer producing Nexus devices. Sure Google has a large portfolio, and as a larger strategy it might not be critical, but at this point of competition it makes no sense to me.

    Ah, well if you think of Google as phone maker, sure. But I don't. I think of them as a mobile platform maker - they make Android to compete with iOS. The making of Pixel is not to compete Google vs. Apple, but to make sure that the Android market doesn't have a gap in that space, which it did.

    What gap did Android have that was filled by the Samsung S7/Note 7?

    We're talking about the Pixel. The gap the Pixel filled was the same one that the Nexus tried to fill. A solid, stable, reference device that should compete directly with the iPhone but also to keep the other vendors on their toes and force them to differentiate the market.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    I don't understand the question. What does Samsung or Samsung's phones have to do with the conversation?

    You said:

    @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    The making of Pixel is not to compete Google vs. Apple, but to make sure that the Android market doesn't have a gap in that space, which it did.

    So I'm asking, what gap?

    I continue on and presume that if there was a gap, that that gap would be filled by Samsung's offerings.



  • @coliver said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @Dashrender said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    The best clone on the market, almost as good as the real thing.

    What I don't get is why they're copying the most stagnant platform on the market. Apple hasn't done any real innovation in a long time. Features the iPhone is just now getting in iOS X have been on the other platforms for a long time.

    Maybe because the market has loved the design from the beginning and now Google realizes that you don't need to change to be good. Who needs new phone features every year? No me, I just want one that works really well. You can call iPhone stagnant, but I felt that it worked better than Android four years ago when I switched and I feel it is better now. Android may have flailed in the meantime, but change for the sake of change isn't good. You need improvement.

    If you only copy the market leader then you are forgoing any differentiation that might allow you to compete. If someone offers me a Dr. Pepper vs a Mr. Pibb I will always take the Dr. Pepper even for slightly more. The same holds true in this case. With little/no differentiation the only market is the "never iPhone" group.

    That's the thing, though, they do a ton of stuff. It is just the one, singular product that is copying the leader. It's just rounding out a portfolio, not replacing one.

    I'm not sure what you're getting at here. The intersection of competition between Google and Apple is their smartphone. This is Google's phone since they're no longer producing Nexus devices. Sure Google has a large portfolio, and as a larger strategy it might not be critical, but at this point of competition it makes no sense to me.

    Ah, well if you think of Google as phone maker, sure. But I don't. I think of them as a mobile platform maker - they make Android to compete with iOS. The making of Pixel is not to compete Google vs. Apple, but to make sure that the Android market doesn't have a gap in that space, which it did.

    What gap did Android have that was filled by the Samsung S7/Note 7?

    We're talking about the Pixel. The gap the Pixel filled was the same one that the Nexus tried to fill. A solid, stable, reference device that should compete directly with the iPhone but also to keep the other vendors on their toes and force them to differentiate the market.

    Oh, so the gap was that Apple has a pure iOS only device and that on the Android side of the house, there was no such purist Android thing.. so the Nexus, and now the Pixel fills that gap.

    I guess my next thought is.. who cares? No really? from a mass consumer point of view, who cares? normal users don't care if it's plain Android of Samsung's bastardization of Android on their device, as long as it works.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @Dashrender said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    The best clone on the market, almost as good as the real thing.

    What I don't get is why they're copying the most stagnant platform on the market. Apple hasn't done any real innovation in a long time. Features the iPhone is just now getting in iOS X have been on the other platforms for a long time.

    Maybe because the market has loved the design from the beginning and now Google realizes that you don't need to change to be good. Who needs new phone features every year? No me, I just want one that works really well. You can call iPhone stagnant, but I felt that it worked better than Android four years ago when I switched and I feel it is better now. Android may have flailed in the meantime, but change for the sake of change isn't good. You need improvement.

    If you only copy the market leader then you are forgoing any differentiation that might allow you to compete. If someone offers me a Dr. Pepper vs a Mr. Pibb I will always take the Dr. Pepper even for slightly more. The same holds true in this case. With little/no differentiation the only market is the "never iPhone" group.

    That's the thing, though, they do a ton of stuff. It is just the one, singular product that is copying the leader. It's just rounding out a portfolio, not replacing one.

    I'm not sure what you're getting at here. The intersection of competition between Google and Apple is their smartphone. This is Google's phone since they're no longer producing Nexus devices. Sure Google has a large portfolio, and as a larger strategy it might not be critical, but at this point of competition it makes no sense to me.

    Ah, well if you think of Google as phone maker, sure. But I don't. I think of them as a mobile platform maker - they make Android to compete with iOS. The making of Pixel is not to compete Google vs. Apple, but to make sure that the Android market doesn't have a gap in that space, which it did.

    What gap did Android have that was filled by the Samsung S7/Note 7?

    I don't understand the question. What does Samsung or Samsung's phones have to do with the conversation?

    Nothing. He is conflating points as per normal.


  • Banned

    I just bought the Nexus 6P.. I think I'm returning it and going back to my iPhone 6. Mostly because of the Bluetooth issues and with the Pixel coming out it's confirmed google will abandon and stop supporting the nexus line. Sad espcially since I like vanillia android and the openness compared to iOS but at least things work on iOS..


  • Banned

    @coliver said in Google Pixel Phone:

    We're talking about the Pixel. The gap the Pixel filled was the same one that the Nexus tried to fill. A solid, stable, reference device that should compete directly with the iPhone but also to keep the other vendors on their toes and force them to differentiate the market.

    Except the Pixel will be 1.) way more expensive. 2.) not vanilla android.



  • @Jason said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @coliver said in Google Pixel Phone:

    We're talking about the Pixel. The gap the Pixel filled was the same one that the Nexus tried to fill. A solid, stable, reference device that should compete directly with the iPhone but also to keep the other vendors on their toes and force them to differentiate the market.

    Except the Pixel will be 1.) way more expensive. 2.) not vanilla android.

    Exactly. This is a reduction in both competition and innovation rather than the reverse. They're offering an undifferentiated device at an undifferentiated price point and abandoning the reverse competitive position. This is what I do not understand.


  • Banned

    @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    Exactly. This is a reduction in both competition and innovation rather than the reverse. They're offering an undifferentiated device at an undifferentiated price point and abandoning the reverse competitive position. This is what I do not understand.

    Yup makes me not care for android. I don't want a Device that takes forever to get updates, nor do I want the bloated and expensive ones that Samsung makes. So there is no market that matches my needs on Android anymore. Nexus fit that perfectly.



  • @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @Jason said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @coliver said in Google Pixel Phone:

    We're talking about the Pixel. The gap the Pixel filled was the same one that the Nexus tried to fill. A solid, stable, reference device that should compete directly with the iPhone but also to keep the other vendors on their toes and force them to differentiate the market.

    Except the Pixel will be 1.) way more expensive. 2.) not vanilla android.

    Exactly. This is a reduction in both competition and innovation rather than the reverse. They're offering an undifferentiated device at an undifferentiated price point and abandoning the reverse competitive position. This is what I do not understand.

    They are adding options to the market, how does that reduce competition or innovation?



  • @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @Jason said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @coliver said in Google Pixel Phone:

    We're talking about the Pixel. The gap the Pixel filled was the same one that the Nexus tried to fill. A solid, stable, reference device that should compete directly with the iPhone but also to keep the other vendors on their toes and force them to differentiate the market.

    Except the Pixel will be 1.) way more expensive. 2.) not vanilla android.

    Exactly. This is a reduction in both competition and innovation rather than the reverse. They're offering an undifferentiated device at an undifferentiated price point and abandoning the reverse competitive position. This is what I do not understand.

    They are adding options to the market, how does that reduce competition or innovation?

    They are removing options from the market that were differentiated in both price and configuration, and replacing it with an option that is neither.



  • @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @Jason said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @coliver said in Google Pixel Phone:

    We're talking about the Pixel. The gap the Pixel filled was the same one that the Nexus tried to fill. A solid, stable, reference device that should compete directly with the iPhone but also to keep the other vendors on their toes and force them to differentiate the market.

    Except the Pixel will be 1.) way more expensive. 2.) not vanilla android.

    Exactly. This is a reduction in both competition and innovation rather than the reverse. They're offering an undifferentiated device at an undifferentiated price point and abandoning the reverse competitive position. This is what I do not understand.

    They are adding options to the market, how does that reduce competition or innovation?

    They are removing options from the market that were differentiated in both price and configuration, and replacing it with an option that is neither.

    Do you mean removing the Nexus?



  • @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @scottalanmiller said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @Kelly said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @Jason said in Google Pixel Phone:

    @coliver said in Google Pixel Phone:

    We're talking about the Pixel. The gap the Pixel filled was the same one that the Nexus tried to fill. A solid, stable, reference device that should compete directly with the iPhone but also to keep the other vendors on their toes and force them to differentiate the market.

    Except the Pixel will be 1.) way more expensive. 2.) not vanilla android.

    Exactly. This is a reduction in both competition and innovation rather than the reverse. They're offering an undifferentiated device at an undifferentiated price point and abandoning the reverse competitive position. This is what I do not understand.

    They are adding options to the market, how does that reduce competition or innovation?

    They are removing options from the market that were differentiated in both price and configuration, and replacing it with an option that is neither.

    Do you mean removing the Nexus?

    Aye