new begineer lT



  • @jimmynelson said in new begineer lT:

    @nadnerB . l'm so new . that means i need to dowload Ubuntu or.Mint at google.com in my laptop right ?? explain better please how to start?? thank you



  • @jimmynelson said in new begineer lT:

    @nadnerB . l'm so new . that means i need to download Ubuntu or Mint in my my Laptop please explain better thank.you. i want to start learning Linux



  • Yes, you'll need to download VirtualBox and also either Ubuntu or Mint to your laptop.



  • If you are unsure of something, google it. 😃



  • Welcome to ML @jimmynelson

    To get started with a virtual environment (playground / sandbox) you need to download a hypervisor. Assuming you don't have dedicated hardware to test on, you'll want a type 2 hypervisor. One of the most common Type 2 hypervisors is VirtualBox as @nadnerB has said.

    It runs as an application within your current Operating system. It is designed for a few use cases. If this were a production environment you'd want to use a Type 1 Hypervisor, the top 3 in this category are (no particular order) XenServer, Hyper-V and ESXi. You can read up on the differences between type 1 and type 2 hypervisors here.

    Start by downloading VirtualBox from here and to download Linux Mint or Ubuntu just head over to their respective websites and download an ISO from either of them.

    Wish you luck, it's rather easy to get learning this.



  • @DustinB3403 hello dustin, l'm planning to apply
    forCity University London
    Courses Short Courses Linux Network and System Administration
    Linux Network and System Administration Short Courses
    OverviewWhat will I learn?Teaching and AssessmentRecommended Reading
    As more organizations turn to open-source solutions, practical experience of Linux becomes essential for system administrators. In this hands-on Linux Network and System Administration short course, you will install the Linux distribution of your choice, tackle common problems and be given an extensive comparison of the plethora of Linux distributions and packages.

    You will configure multiple parts of a Linux system with the goal to optimize its functionality, reliability, performance and security. As 'root' user, you will have administrative privileges to perform System Administration tasks such as user account management, file system backup and restore, device configuration, automating tasks, while getting acquainted with shell scripting languages and troubleshooting along the way.

    Topics also include an extensive explanation of networking protocols, Inter-Process Communication, network configuration and tools for internet connectivity, an overview of Linux network security and firewall, as well as installation of a L.A.M.P. server.

    You must bring your own laptop to this class.

    Course Information college training i live in london. dustin that good enough to start??



  • @jimmynelson said in new begineer lT:

    @DustinB3403 hello dustin, l'm planning to apply
    forCity University London
    Courses Short Courses Linux Network and System Administration
    Linux Network and System Administration Short Courses
    OverviewWhat will I learn?Teaching and AssessmentRecommended Reading
    As more organizations turn to open-source solutions, practical experience of Linux becomes essential for system administrators. In this hands-on Linux Network and System Administration short course, you will install the Linux distribution of your choice, tackle common problems and be given an extensive comparison of the plethora of Linux distributions and packages.

    You will configure multiple parts of a Linux system with the goal to optimize its functionality, reliability, performance and security. As 'root' user, you will have administrative privileges to perform System Administration tasks such as user account management, file system backup and restore, device configuration, automating tasks, while getting acquainted with shell scripting languages and troubleshooting along the way.

    Topics also include an extensive explanation of networking protocols, Inter-Process Communication, network configuration and tools for internet connectivity, an overview of Linux network security and firewall, as well as installation of a L.A.M.P. server.

    You must bring your own laptop to this class.

    Course Information college training i live in london. dustin that good enough to start??

    What will I learn?
    Installing a Linux distribution: criteria for choosing a distribution, disk partitioning, BIOS settings, authentication settings, and Installation of packages (applications).
    Overview of the Unix file system; bash shell; console commands; directory structure and important configuration files.
    The boot up sequence of Linux, how to manage services and servers.
    Device issues: how to setup external hard drives and identify newly connected devices.
    Basics of system administration: 'root' privileges; user accounts and management; backup and restore; overview of storage media and performance issues, automating tasks.
    System Security issues: ownerships and permissions for files, directories, users, groups, processes.
    PERL scripting language and writing useful administrative scripts; data structures, control loops, handling files, regular expressions.
    InterProcess Communication: Pipes, UNIX sockets; TCP/IP protocols suite; fundamentals of Internet architecture, Server/Client models.
    Configuring Linux: for networking in Local Area Networking and Wide Area Networking using TCP/IP, DNS configuration, routing table and tools to get statistics for your network.
    Network Security Issues: The embedded security of Linux systems and how to configure it according to our needs, firewalls, IPtables commands.
    Setting up the Apache web server with php and MySQL, enabling the userdir module and your site. Introduction to Mail servers, FTP servers, SSH server and Webadmin for remote system configuration.
    By the end of the course you will be able to:

    Safely install any Linux distribution.
    Feel comfortable using Console commands to administer your server.
    Know how to locate important files in a Unix environment.
    Apply system security and configure it to your needs.
    Configure the Network and install important network services (servers).
    Apply Network Security and configure firewalls
    Read/Write administrative scripts using the PERL language.
    Have a better understanding of the Internet Architectur



  • @jimmynelson I personally wouldn't go to college to learn linux administration...



  • @DustinB3403 said in new begineer lT:

    @jimmynelson I personally wouldn't go to college to learn linux administration...

    l' m new begineer



  • @jimmynelson said in new begineer lT:

    @DustinB3403 said in new begineer lT:

    @jimmynelson I personally wouldn't go to college to learn linux administration...

    l' m new begineer

    Just because you are new, doesn't mean you have to go to college to learn Linux Administration.



  • @DustinB3403 i need trainer or whats about getting or apply for Redhat certification??



  • Slow down, mate. Don't get too far ahead of yourself.
    Have a go at the VirtualBox setup and try out some stuff on Linux BEFORE you make a massive financial commitment.



  • @nadnerB ok Boss thanks. Lol. l'll set up virtualBox start to learn.



  • @nadnerB said in new begineer lT:

    Slow down, mate. Don't get too far ahead of yourself.
    Have a go at the VirtualBox setup and try out some stuff on Linux BEFORE you make a massive financial commitment.

    This is what I was trying to get at. Investing in training is a good thing, if you are certain that is what you want to do.

    But start by getting a basic understanding of what it is you might be doing, before you go and invest in training.



  • @DustinB3403 ok good better idea.



  • @jimmynelson said in new begineer lT:

    @DustinB3403 ok good better idea.thank you



  • @jimmynelson whats is centos ?



  • @jimmynelson said in new begineer lT:

    @jimmynelson whats is centos ?

    Community ENTerprise Operating System
    In a nut shell, it's the community supported version of Red Hat



  • @jimmynelson welcome to IT and MangoLassi!



  • @nadnerB said in new begineer lT:

    Welcome to Mangolassi 🙂

    @jimmynelson said in new begineer lT:

    can someone explain.which one good career future forward and good pay ahead in better future.

    Well, that depends on where you are in the world. Linux is more common in some countries, while Windows more is common in others.
    If you have no idea, a starting point could be to have a look a job websites in your area and see what's in demand.

    In what country is Windows more common? I thought that the US was the most-Windows centric country, and it's dramatically Linux leading.



  • @scottalanmiller said in new begineer lT:

    @nadnerB said in new begineer lT:

    Welcome to Mangolassi 🙂

    @jimmynelson said in new begineer lT:

    can someone explain.which one good career future forward and good pay ahead in better future.

    Well, that depends on where you are in the world. Linux is more common in some countries, while Windows more is common in others.
    If you have no idea, a starting point could be to have a look a job websites in your area and see what's in demand.

    In what country is Windows more common? I thought that the US was the most-Windows centric country, and it's dramatically Linux leading.

    AFAIK, It's more common here in Australia. I don't have any stats to back myself up that's why I haven't gone all sweeping generalisation on everyone... I left room for error 😉



  • @DustinB3403 said in new begineer lT:

    @jimmynelson said in new begineer lT:

    @DustinB3403 said in new begineer lT:

    @jimmynelson I personally wouldn't go to college to learn linux administration...

    l' m new begineer

    Just because you are new, doesn't mean you have to go to college to learn Linux Administration.

    In fact, the discussions around the usefulness of college pretty much always assume that you are new, people who are not new in IT don't normally discuss college.



  • @DustinB3403 said in new begineer lT:

    @nadnerB said in new begineer lT:

    Slow down, mate. Don't get too far ahead of yourself.
    Have a go at the VirtualBox setup and try out some stuff on Linux BEFORE you make a massive financial commitment.

    This is what I was trying to get at. Investing in training is a good thing, if you are certain that is what you want to do.

    But start by getting a basic understanding of what it is you might be doing, before you go and invest in training.

    This is very important. You should know a lot of basics before considering training. Otherwise you will likely not get much or any value from the training. And in nearly all cases, you can teach yourself far better, far faster without the training.



  • @jimmynelson said in new begineer lT:

    @DustinB3403 i need trainer or whats about getting or apply for Redhat certification??

    No, you don't need a trainer for Linux. That's true with VMware, but not for any Linux cert (or any cert I would accept on a resume - boot camps and required classes equal valueless cert to me as a hiring manager, that's just a cert saying you showed up, not that you learned anything.)

    For Linux certs you get a book, you install Linux and you learn. If you have any struggles doing that, you should reconsider your career plans because that's how you will need to learn for your entire career. That will never go away just because you got your foot in the door. People who need classes to get started in IT normally fail shortly thereafter when they find that there are no classes for their continuing growth and without that growth they go nowhere.



  • @nadnerB said in new begineer lT:

    Slow down, mate. Don't get too far ahead of yourself.
    Have a go at the VirtualBox setup and try out some stuff on Linux BEFORE you make a massive financial commitment.

    Yup. One step at a time. Learn VirtualBox. Get CentOS. Start learning CentOS. If you don't know these technologies already, you aren't anywhere close to knowing what career paths you want to pursue yet. Explore some things, you need to find something that you are really interested in.



  • @scottalanmiller yeah Great good scott.



  • Hi Jimmy.
    Have you taken a look at 'system administrator' job postings for your location, or locations where you can see yourself living? If your market is on the smaller side, jobs might pivot toward Windows administration or Linux administration. My city, for example, is extremely Windows. Our main industries are medical/engineering/manufacturing - meaning lots of desktops running Windows and lots of Windows infrastructure managing it.

    If I drive 4 hours away, there's another town (Silicon Valley of Montana), with new startups dealing mainly in web/analytics/big data/SaaS. 3 of every 4 job postings there are for Linux sysadmins.

    Know your market. If you're in a big city, I don't think you can do any harm with either. Follow your heart. But smaller places tend to be dominated by two or three industries that may not give you that freedom.



  • @TAHIN thanks i live in london. only windows and linux admin operated in uk



  • @jimmynelson said in new begineer lT:

    @TAHIN thanks i live in london. only windows and linux admin operated in uk

    That's not true at all. London is the number two IT city in the world, every OS is there. I know personally many (hundreds or thousands) of Solaris, AIX, BSD and similar admins alone, and we all know that iSeries, Z, OpenVMS and every other OS is there, too. Job listings are useless, good jobs don't go on listings. Listings are mostly fake and will heavily mislead you.



  • @scottalanmiller yes of you re right but must jobs in windows microsoft paying high and linux admin as well


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